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What you're doing wrong in an interview... and in your life.

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posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 10:42 AM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone

How about "know who you are"?

I have told bosses they needed to "know their place". Everyone has a "place". My boss, if he does not have my skill set, needs to back away when he's about to screw up a lot of hard work... and I will and have gone straight up the chain of command to make sure he did back off or at least will in the future.

Don't let words rule your life, and don't let your knee jerk whenever your ear says to.

TheRedneck




posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Be confident but humble- I think many companies get arrogance mixed up with confidence a lot of time and that ends up costing them right off the start because someone that makes decisions and is unwilling to listen to people that are trying to help the person (and company) when he/she makes bad calls. This is especially true with a small manufacturer that hired me for my first part time job when I was 18 or so.

I learned from this experience that the person that talks a lot is not always the best person for the job (after I was promoted as a hiring manager). Some people are confident in ability but, are generally quiet people and info needs to be pulled from them. I lol'ed on the flaws bit.

My flaw was that I do not do a lot of idle chit chat while working and generally keep work/home separate. To a degree co-workers were sometimes unnerved when I do not talk about personal home life. I was considered an emotionless monster because by company policy a hiring manager had to "walk people to the gate with a supervisor as witness." Personally I felt bad when some of these people were having problems but, I wasn't there to be their psychiatrist.

Be specific.- At the same time coming to a new company I would rather they straight up tell me they don't know rather than make up an answer when they aren't exactly sure. What I did expect was asking specific questions when I took them on the million dollar tour since that company had expanded with the newest technology that wasn't common in the industry at the time. A lot of these questions also revealed the person.

Do your research ahead of time, have informed questions available.- This is true and we did appreciate when potential employees have a general idea of what the company does and showing you really want the job but, we also didn't want people coming in and bringing bad/wrong ideas with them from their old job even if they did something similar before. Many times I have had to catch someone rambling about their past similar job and tell them, "I'm sorry but, don't bring that past these doors if you are hired." Being positive and bubbly didn't really go one way or the other with me. I've seen too many people that hop in there bubbly and happy and realize the job isn't fun at all and turn negative on a dime.

(NOBODY SAID THIS- For Continuing Employment) Leave your home, family, relationship problems at the front door. After employed for a month counselors and psychiatrists paid for by the company insurance can help you with these. I could not.

I think in a lot of ways while hiring people you can't have a set way of doing interviews because there are ways of getting what one wants from every employee but, different approaches are needed to do so. One of the things we had in our training was learning personality types such as the chart below. I fell under Beaver. I think a lot of companies look for lions and have problems later on because of people trying to leap frog each other over the top spot while letting their current job suffer.


Lion (Choleric/Dominance)

Strengths– Visionary, practical, productive, strong-willed, independent, decisive, leader

Weaknesses– Cold, domineering, unemotional self-sufficient, unforgiving, sarcastic, cruel

Otter Temperament Otter (Sanguine/Influence)

Strengths– Outgoing, responsive, warm, friendly, talkative, enthusiastic, compassionate

Weaknesses– Undisciplined, unproductive, exaggerates, egocentric, unstable

Retriever TemperamentGolden Retriever (Phlegmatic/Steadiness)

Strengths– Calm, easy-going, dependable, quiet, objective, diplomatic, humorous

Weaknesses– Selfish, stingy, procrastinator, unmotivated, indecisive, fearful, worrier

Beaver TemperamentBeaver (Melancholy/Compliance)

Strengths– Analytical, self-disciplined, industrious, organized, aesthetic, sacrificing

Weaknesses– Moody, self-centered, touchy, negative, unsociable, critical, revengeful














edit on 9/7/12 by toochaos4u because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone

If you look strange, or don't know anybody, or have an unusual personality, it just doesn't matter how much of an education you have, you will never get hired period.



I'm sorry... I couldn't help myself... I just read your post and saw my picture at the same time.

I look strange, most people just don't like me, and I would probably go into shock if anyone ever told me I wasn't 'weird'!

I guess I dreamed two successful careers and too many jobs to list in a novel-sized application....



TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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I am surprised that no one has said it, but the TheRedneck admits to not having real employment for several years yet he is giving advice on how people should interview for jobs. He has had prior careers which obviously have gone kaput, yet he is giving advice on how to keep your job. He is currently working some "grunt" labor job, yet he gives advice on how to treat your employees. Give me a break already.

Redneck I like your writing style, it is captivating to say the least. I enjoy reading it. But enough of your holier than though advice columns. You act as you are the expert on everything yet you describe an employment cycle in which you never could quite make it. Always having to start over.

For the record, how many different jobs have you had in your life and how many terms of unemployment have you had?



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by toochaos4u
 


Good stuff.



I fell under Beaver. I think a lot of companies look for lions and have problems later on because of people trying to leap frog each other over the top spot while letting their current job suffer.


I think you're right, a lot of companies make this mistake. They hire a specific personality type, instead of hiring a good combination of personalities. There is an art to team-building. It takes all types to have a successful team. You can't just have superstars or bookworms, you need both, and everything in between. What I personally prefer are the chameleon types. I prefer the people that are intelligent and confident, but also willing and able to observe and fill in whatever role is missing in a team. Sometimes they are the leader, but other times they are the researcher or grunt. They can step up and give a presentation, or they can hang back and run the projector. Those types of people are invaluable to any team, and they make my job a lot easier.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by sligtlyskeptical
 



For the record, how many different jobs have you had in your life and how many terms of unemployment have you had?


I don't think he comes across as holier than thou. It is just his advice, take it or leave it. It is one source, maybe some of it is useful to you, maybe not. It is a worthwhile effort though, because people really do make a lot of mistakes when it comes to interviewing, or just being employees.

As for me, I've probably had 100 jobs in my life. Everything from Sonic and McDonalds (my favorite job ever!), to running construction companies, to automotive services, ASE-certified mechanic, District Manager for a large corporation, ran a Walmart store for awhile, I was a route driver, worked in banks, sold bathroom accessories, sold radio advertising and wrote copy, and my degree is in Chemical Engineering, but I currently work for the government leading a team of investigators.

I've never drawn unemployment though. I've been unemployed plenty of times, and I've even applied for unemployment before, found out how much it would pay, and decided I'd be better off mowing lawns for a few weeks until I could find a real job.

I've been fired twice, once deservedly, once not. I've been promoted in record time on many occasions, sometimes even on my first day of employment. My last stint in retail I went from sales, to service manager the first day, and from service manager to store manager a week later, and from store manager to group manager of the 4 stores in my town later that month, and district manager a couple of months later, and I ended up becoming a corporate trainer and presenting training materials at annual conferences and trade shows to groups of 600 to 1000 people at a time.

There's my resume if it's important. I've also got 2 small boys, and a pretty wife, and an ex-wife that I'm still friends with.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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Interview?!? I have applied for 500 jobs in the last month and not one interview. How do you get an interview? I could not sell a glass of water to a millionaire dying of thirst in the desert. So that cuts me out of 90% of the jobs that are hiring. I also do not have a CDL. When you take those two occupations out of the equation, there are no jobs to interview for. I miss Bill Clinton. At least then working was easy.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by Ookie
Interview?!? I have applied for 500 jobs in the last month and not one interview. How do you get an interview? I could not sell a glass of water to a millionaire dying of thirst in the desert. So that cuts me out of 90% of the jobs that are hiring. I also do not have a CDL. When you take those two occupations out of the equation, there are no jobs to interview for. I miss Bill Clinton. At least then working was easy.


Nope according to the OP you're wrong in life.f



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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I expected this to be tips on how best to present yourself in an interview in order to be employed, but it reads more like an instruction manual for your employees once they've got that job.

Personally I think the best tips are just basic things like show up on time, look presentable, Dress appropriately for what that job entails, be polite, honest, exude some confidence, have the skills and experience in the trade you are seeking employment for, enquire what the hours will be and show some enthusiasm that there isn't going to be a problem working those hours, but don't make commitments you can't keep.

Assure your potential employer the location of the job isn't going to be an issue and you have transportation to and from the job. Avoid saying things like I don't have a car and I'm not sure I can get a babysitter, etc. you don't won't to appear you're bringing your baggage along. You might have covered this in " I'm not adopting you" .

Having a resume of previous employment with good references is an important part but does not apply to all trades.

Some people mail out resumes seeking employment and they read more like their boring life story nobody even reads.

You need to see the manager or boss in person. Go there and ask to speak to whoever it is. They aren't psychic. Don't drop resumes off at the front desk and think " thats it, I applied". Don't be lazy, go in person. Take some time to do it right. Be aware other applicants are your competition at this point. I can't stress how important this is and often it will result in getting the job right there and then.
ETA: not all employers have placed their ads yet and it's a good idea to just go into a place you are interested in working at and outright ask if they are looking to hire. For example if you're interested in working at a store, then go right into a shopping mall and hit every store with this enquiry. Ask to speak to the person in charge of hiring, if they arent there, then go back when they are. Don't assume they don't need anybody just because there's no ad. A job isn't going to just land on your lap, looking for work literally means you do that.

Respect works both ways. As much as it was a lot of time, effort and funds to create that job, your employees are a valuable asset you are also investing in, and no employee is going to be happy and put their full effort in if they don't feel appreciated.
edit on 9-7-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-7-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-7-2012 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by Ookie
 


Make your application memorable. In this day and age of electronic applications, there are often 500 applications for a single job. Only about 1/3rd of those people are truly interested in the position, so for the reviewer it becomes a task of eliminating as many as possible to make the hiring task surmountable.

Make sure to read the advertisement and use the key words they are looking for. Put them in your cover letter, your Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities paragraph (KSA's), and put them in the descriptions of your previous jobs.

Make sure your previous employers have good contact numbers and reference names, but make sure those references will be positive. If your previous supervisor won't be kind, then link them to the HR department, or a friendly supervisor of another team that will give you a kind reference.

If there is a contact number in the ad, make sure you follow up a couple of days after applying, verify they received it, ask if there is anything else they need, make sure to give them your name, and ask for a contact person so you can follow up later. Don't bug them every day though, just about once per week should be sufficient.

Make sure you give yourself credit for everything you know. Don't just say "computer literate." Say you are experienced and competent in using Microsoft Office, Word, Outlook, Excel, Publisher, Powerpoint, as well as listing any databases you have used in the past. Make sure you list any experience you have dealing with authorities like zoning, revenue, statutes and regulations, etc.

Mainly, just remember to use specific information, pertinent to the job at hand, and give yourself all the credit you can think of. Keep your cover letter to one page, and make sure the cover letter is a concise rendering of what follows in the application or resume.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by sligtlyskeptical
 



For the record, how many different jobs have you had in your life and how many terms of unemployment have you had?


I don't think he comes across as holier than thou. It is just his advice, take it or leave it. It is one source, maybe some of it is useful to you, maybe not. It is a worthwhile effort though, because people really do make a lot of mistakes when it comes to interviewing, or just being employees.

As for me, I've probably had 100 jobs in my life. Everything from Sonic and McDonalds (my favorite job ever!), to running construction companies, to automotive services, ASE-certified mechanic, District Manager for a large corporation, ran a Walmart store for awhile, I was a route driver, worked in banks, sold bathroom accessories, sold radio advertising and wrote copy, and my degree is in Chemical Engineering, but I currently work for the government leading a team of investigators.

I've never drawn unemployment though. I've been unemployed plenty of times, and I've even applied for unemployment before, found out how much it would pay, and decided I'd be better off mowing lawns for a few weeks until I could find a real job.

I've been fired twice, once deservedly, once not. I've been promoted in record time on many occasions, sometimes even on my first day of employment. My last stint in retail I went from sales, to service manager the first day, and from service manager to store manager a week later, and from store manager to group manager of the 4 stores in my town later that month, and district manager a couple of months later, and I ended up becoming a corporate trainer and presenting training materials at annual conferences and trade shows to groups of 600 to 1000 people at a time.

There's my resume if it's important. I've also got 2 small boys, and a pretty wife, and an ex-wife that I'm still friends with.


My post wasn't directed to you, but I find it hard to believe that you have done all those jobs and yet you have two small boys? Why don't you last at any job for any length of time? Isn't that the another thing that employers also want? If they give the raises and the promotions shouldn't they expect you to stick around for a while?

It all doesn't add up. Myself, I have had dozens of different jobs in my 32 years working. I've worked for myself the last 10 years. I have no employees. I am more of the opinion that employees in this day and age should do the bare minimum in order to keep their jobs as the compensation for doing an excellent job is usually lacking by a large amount. I know of dozens of businesses who lost a key employee for these reasons and stopped experiencing success and are on the verge of folding. The employees are the business and owners usually want to keep too much of the business earnings for themselves. If you can't run a business without exploiting employees, then you shouldn't be running a business at all.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Ookie
 


If there is a contact number in the ad, make sure you follow up a couple of days after applying, verify they received it, ask if there is anything else they need, make sure to give them your name, and ask for a contact person so you can follow up later. Don't bug them every day though, just about once per week should be sufficient.


Even if we left no contact number I was always impressed when someone took the time to find it and called about their application/resume. When this happened I would highlight the application/resume with a marker and move it to the top of the stack. But, don't call and bother me every day though.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by sligtlyskeptical

For the record, how many different jobs have you had in your life and how many terms of unemployment have you had?

Fair enough question...

I have no idea. How do you define 'unemployment'? 'Self-employment'? Here's the synopsis, if you wish to dig through it...

I started working at age 12. I hauled hay, mowed yards, fixed stuff, etc. When I was in high school, I started working construction as well. I learned block-laying, brick-laying, electrical, and carpentry. I had a few contractors actually employ me for short terms, but a lot of it was day-labor. As I got closer to graduation, I even started doing some subcontracting myself.

After high school, I got a job as a structural draftsman and worked at that for 6 years (laid off when the nuclear plant closed), during which time I was promoted to designer. I also worked on the side for individuals drawing house plans. After the layoff jobs were scarcer here then than they are now, but I wanted to finish my college. So I did some more contracting, expanded my house plan drawing, and managed to get a gig as an electrician subcontracting for a local Jim-Walter-clone.

After a while I got another job offer as a designer job shopping. The pay was too good to pass up, so I took it. I went through some job shops, made some money, got back in a good place, and went back to employment. Within a few years I was Chief Draftsman at a large structural steel company. Personality conflicts arose, and I went off on my own and started a C-Corp specializing in structural steel and architectural design. That was successful enough to get me legal threats from local architects (but since I knew the laws, they weren't much more than comic relief).

I had a bout with sickness that caused that business to close after 10 years of success.

After I recovered, I started working day-jobs and handyman work for individuals while I looked for a rung up. I found it, but it wasn't design any more; design had become computerized while I was laid up sick, and I had no formal training in computers (although I was pretty familiar with them). Instead I had a friend offer to let me bid on assembling 9 computers for his business. I entered a bid and immediately took the lowest, most degrading job I could imagine: working for the traveling carnival while they were in town. I got the bid on the computers, used the money from the carnival to purchase parts, filled the order, and got paid for that job. I then got a student loan to get training as truck driver, used the money from the computers to pay living expenses for the three weeks of training, took a job as a trainee, and went driving.

That lasted 8 years and probably a dozen companies. I saved enough money to build my workshop, took a leave of absence to build and stock it, then left OTR driving for a regional job that gave me more time at home with my family and my shop. That job changed policies to the point I simply could not perform the job they wanted, so I left.

I then started putting together a plan and took grunt jobs in the meantime. I also took a job as a Census Enumerator which payed good money for a month and a half before laying me off. That layoff caused me to be eligible for WIA tuition, so I went back to school and just two months ago received a degree in Computer Science. I also work at the college as a part-time math tutor and IT assistant.

Now I have all sorts of possibilities. The only question is, which do I choose to pursue?
  • I could take a regular job as IT technician at a local business. Nice, quiet 9-5 with benefits.

  • I already have the beginnings of a computer repair/software business started. Risky, but satisfying.

  • I have several products I could build to sell as lawn ornaments. That will require hiring a few workers, nice potential return.

  • I have about 4 different major projects that are close to being marketable. There I am talking about hiring quite a few people in a manufacturing facility, but serious financial potential.

  • I have the ability, due to my GPA, to continue for an Electrical Engineering AS degree, and will quite probably be able to receive a full ride scholarship at a leading University close to me to finish out a minimum of a MS. A lifetime dream now possible.

  • I have been approached about starting a school for gifted students, by both the local college and TVA. That will entail a tremendous amount of bull-hockey-soaked red tape, but it would be the most satisfying.

All that from a guy who was born to a poor blue-collar family in the middle of nowhere.

Yeah, don't listen to me. I don't sit and cry enough.


I do things.

TheRedneck

 
PS: I am not looking for advice; that stage of consideration is over. I am simply answering a question... and learning just how confused society is.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by sligtlyskeptical
 


I'm 38, I started working full-time at 15 for Sonic and another little ice cream shop close to my house. My boys are aged 5 and 4. I worked jobs 2 at a time sometimes. I worked some jobs for just a matter of days or weeks, but some jobs I kept for years. I worked on a pipeline for 3 days once.
When I was selling radio advertising, and writing copy, and DJing part time, I was also a Real Estate agent at the same time, and delivering pizzas at night. 3 (or 4) jobs at once. I'm stingy like that. I've done all that and more. I just picked out some of my bigger and more memorable jobs, but there were many, many more. I worked at a mini-golf course for awhile, I was a maintenance supervisor at a juice factory, I worked a manufacturing job drilling holes in truck doors, I've been a bookkeeper (nights, while I worked for the government during the days), I owned a Sinclair Gas Station and Convenience store, I ran a pressure-washing, fence and deck-building, landscaping company for awhile. I spent a whole year on a beach in Florida with my ex-wife completely unemployed until we ran out of money. Got a good tan and beach volleyball skills though!


Why don't you last at any job for any length of time? Isn't that the another thing that employers also want? If they give the raises and the promotions shouldn't they expect you to stick around for a while?



Yes, at times in the past my work history was a hindrance. Of course, I often left off the little ones and just listed the major jobs. This day and age, employers are not looking for a 20 year employee, they are happy if you stay 1 to 3 years. The average turnover rate is about 3 years.

I'm not always 100% honest on my application about my job history, I just put the good stuff on there. I won't lie, if they ask me questions, I will answer them honestly, but I don't offer up any of the bad stuff voluntarily.



posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
With the recent jobs report, along with reports that there are plenty of unfilled jobs that I keep hearing, I thought it might be time to sit back into that chair I used to occupy: the prospective employer. Here's what I want from the person sitting across from me asking for a job:
  • I want you to be able to do the job. That is not the same thing as making good grades in school. It means you know how that particular industry operates, what your place in it is, how your work affects others down the line, and you can hit the ground running, producing from day one. I am, after all, paying you from day one.


As a Employee I expect to be trained in the position, I need to be given the tools in order to succeed. If I succeed in this job, you as the owner will also succeed.


  • I want you support my business. That might mean taking on extra responsibilities at times. It does mean not calling in sick because you want to go fishing, and not bad-mouthing the business after hours. That guy you are talking trash about me to in the bar might be the next potential customer. It means helping out filling the void when someone does call in sick. It means doing your job as efficiently and perfectly as possible to increase the bottom line.


  • As a employee my success depends on your success. I have no problem going above and beyond but I expect to be compensated for this. It is not my personal responsibility to run your business, this is your job. If there are shortages its your job to fill the holes.


  • I want you to be honest with me. I do not want a "yes man"... all that does is let me go off on a wild goose chase that will cost me money. I want someone to tell me when I ask what they think of a plan and why. I want someone who will let me know when they have a problem that might affect their job... that way I can plan for possible contingencies arising from those problems.


  • Would you inform your employees of financial crisis involving the business? Would you be honest with us during times of uncertainty? Or would we just show up to locked doors on Monday?




  • I want you to come in on time, every day, and do a full day's work. I'm paying you a full day's pay.


  • Agreed. I expect to be paid accurately and on time as well.


  • I want you to know your place. You are an employee... you come to work, put in your hours, get your pay, and go home. That's fine, but understand that I spent sleepless nights trying to put together business plans, argued with investors, invested my money, my time, my talents, went without because I needed equipment or materials that came before my home life, all without a guarantee of even getting paid, just to make my living and in the process create that job for you. Advice is fine and wanted, but the final decision is mine.


  • So you wish to remind employees that they are below you? I understand this is your lively hood, what I need you to understand is that this job is also my livelihood. I expect leadership and vision for what will make us all benefit from. If you must remind people you are the boss, then I have to question your leadership abilities. Not everyone who runs a business does it successfully.


    You will also not make as much money as I do. Read the last paragraph again.


    What you need to remember is that the profit you earn from your business comes directly off the backs of your employees. Respect is a two way street.


  • I want you to smile. I know it might be hard to do at times, but it mnakes others around you happier to see someone else smiling. A room full of smiling faces makes me smile as well. Smiling faces makes visitors smile too, and that makes customers more willing to spend their money.


  • Its the bosses job to create a safe, clean, and professional atmosphere. If you do these things the wants you want will happen.


  • I want you to be an adult. I am hiring an employee, not adopting a child. I'm not Mommy or Daddy. I am simply paying you a wage and probably benefits in exchange for you working at a job for a specific number of hours a week. Understand that. If you can't live on your paycheck, that's your problem. If you want more money, make yourself worth more and then show me; don't demand I pay you early this week or give you a raise because your kid wants $300 running shoes.


  • You want employees to be responsible for your business but this isn't a two way street. If the job requires you to go above and beyond for you but not the other way for the employee.


  • I want you to use common sense. If you see a safety problem, report it (or clean it up yourself if able then report it). If you see a better way to do something, do it if it is within your ability or let someone know about it if not. If you think something is too dangerous, speak up. Every time you save me a dollar, that makes you worth another dollar to me, and that will eventually turn into a raise or a better job.


  • Again its the boss or owners responsibilities to use standard operating procedures to clean up messes or other safety issues. I agree common since is good, but its up to management to direct the employees.


    And if someone ignores your advice, let it go. You did your part; they did theirs. The chips will fall eventually, and squarely on the shoulders of those responsible.


    I wouldn't pit one employee against another when there should be set sop's. It's your job to set the tone and have procedures in place. Weekly safety meetings would be a great idea to get input from employees about circumstances.


  • Look a little G-Q! Pull up your pants (I don't care what color your underwear is), speak clearly, hold your head up, and change your clothes more than once a week. Once in a while, stand under some water. It's a sad fact that this even has to be included... but trust me, it does.


  • A employee handbook would be a great way to tell your employees a dress code and basic grooming expectations.


  • I want you to not sue me. I am dealing on a daily basis with liability issues in a sue-happy society, and the last thing I want is to worry that my employee might decide to take my hard-earned money over some silly thing that adults are able to talk over and come to an agreement on (or something so ludicrous that outside of a courtroom it would be laughable).

    Calling a government bureaucrat in every time you have a complaint, by the way, is just as bad as filing suit. Worse in one respect: at least you file suit to get money you didn't earn, but you call in a bureaucrat just to hurt someone. Revenge is not a good thing in a relationship.


  • If you provided a safe, clean, healthy working environment, this should not be a issue. I'm not saying all lawsuits or calls to the labor board are not warranted, but if you like most business owners cut corners with worker safety or if you allow sexual harassment then you deserve to be sued. To automatically think you are faultless because you own a business is not realistic.


  • I want you to not hate me. If things work out in this interview, I am about to give you a job that will allow you to have good food, electricity, water, and probably some nice little luxuries like TV and Internet. I will probably be giving you a health insurance plan to keep you healthy. All I ask of you is the common sense things listed above, and to do your job. It's business - you get what you need and I get what I need. So why would you hate someone for giving you that opportunity? Why not just quit and find somewhere else to work or something else to do?

  • The job market will decide if I stay with you or not. If I can do better elsewhere I will. If I'm happy here because you have done a competent job then there should be no issues.

    You have two paragraphs about employees hating you, this speaks volumes. Its not a employees job to set the tone of the workday or the levels or professionalism. You might want to consider hiring some one with leadership skills to run your business for you. Also I can help to add again, you want the employee to go above and beyond, but you want the employee to not concern you with there personal life...



    posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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    edit on 9-7-2012 by LDragonFire because: whooops!!



    posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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    reply to post by TheRedneck
     


    Thanks for answering. I still don't see how any of this gives you the room to be offering advice on employment. Is it to repeat the lessons you have learned in life? I don't see your life as much different from most who grew up blue-collar poor to tell you the truth. I also doubt that many on ATS envy your life above their own. It would also offer more clarity if you expounded on your "accident" and the length of time that left you unable to work since you balme that for your current predicament.

    Whatever path you decide to take going forward - give it all you have and you shouldn't ever have to change occupations again if all you say is true.



    posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 12:48 PM
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    reply to post by LDragonFire
     



    So you wish to remind employees that they are below you? I understand this is your lively hood, what I need you to understand is that this job is also my livelihood. I expect leadership and vision for what will make us all benefit from. If you must remind people you are the boss, then I have to question your leadership abilities. Not everyone who runs a business does it successfully.


    "Know your place" seems to have a negative connotation. I don't think TheRedneck meant it in that negative light. One of our foremost experts on leadership said something similar....


    “When we are debating an issue, loyalty means giving me your honest opinion, whether you think I'll like it or not. Disagreement, at this stage, stimulates me. But once a decision has been made, the debate ends. From that point on, loyalty means executing the decision as if it were your own.”

    Colin Powell Quotes

    "Know your place," means that your opinion is welcome, and encouraged, but once you have shared and supported your opinion, your piece of it is over, the decision is mine, and I expect you to respect and support the final decision even if it isn't what you were hoping for.



    posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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    Yikes...what horrible advice.

    I guess it's good advice if you want to be a subservient pawn for your entire life. This is typical Corporate world BS that comes from people who see other people as slaves to make them money.


    If you follow the OPs "rules"...you will never succeed...you will be a wage slave for your entire life.


    My advice, find something you are interested in and become the best at it. Use corporate jobs to get the training and skills needed and get the hell out to go out on your own.

    Seriously...don't be a subservient slave like the OP wants you to be.



    posted on Jul, 9 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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    I totally agree with the idea that if you don't like your job then find another one. I was working for one company for 4 1/2 years under a great boss until she quit. The next boss was an arrogant, potty mouth sort of fella who was very handsy around me. It didn't matter that I was well-respected, been promoted, had proven success with the company; he didn't listen to my ideas and spent every chance he could get to hug/touch/make crass comments. I started hating my job. I did some research for another job, kept my mouth shut and left when I had enough money saved to start my own business. I did NOT contact human resources and, therefore, did not burn any bridges when I left.

    However, there are some things not worth staying for, even if I get a paycheck for doing my job.



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