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'Black boxes' to monitor all internet and phone data

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posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 07:48 PM
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What makes people think that phones and computers are not already being monitored? When a thread like this one appears I imagine it is a line that has been thrown out with a hook on the end - the cabal/illuminati/whatever will be watching and monitoring the responses.

I have some very interesting 'manifestations' on my home computer. I showed one example to a friend who not only teaches computer skills but can also build them from scratch. My friend looked at the example and shook his head and told me he did not know how the example had been done.

Two technicians from my service provider are also nonplussed and cannot supply an answer. One of the technicians suggested the example was illegal.

I am just a human being going about my days on this planet like a lot of others. To anyone who thinks phone and computer monitoring devices are coming - here's the real news - they are already here and in use. If you think the cabal/illuminati/whatever are going to ask your permission or alert you to their actions - wake up call!!!!!!! People with no conscience or empathy play by their own rules and the rules do not include respect.

Much Peace...




posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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I firmly believe that these black boxes would be easily hacked and certain groups would be able to collect personal data illegally and post it online.

So, in my opinion, this is more of a screw up than the UK gov't will understand until it is finally implemented.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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This capability has been around for a while. Educate yourself on CALEA

And take it from someone who used to set this up for ISP's. They got you if they want you. Encryption doesnt save you. You hook into your ISP's network your data is theirs the second it leaves the NID.
edit on 30-6-2012 by 11235813213455 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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The only way this works is due to the fact that no one encrypts their email in the first place. The packet sniffing programs look for keywords. I have something like that myself. My software can deep search thousands of pages for email address or any other information. I use mine specifically for photo's that I can repost them on a social website. Basically I'm using it as a super charged Google.

Back to the main subject. If a significant portion of the population used encryption, or flooded the system with the keywords being sniffed; it would shut that down so quickly it wouldn't be funny. However, that is where the problem lies. No one does that (a small portion may), so they are able to do a deep search on on all data. In addition, it allows them to focus on the encrypted data by the few.

The only thing that would slow them down would be a 256 bit encryption, but most people don't have the software needed to send that type of email.



posted on Jun, 30 2012 @ 10:23 PM
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There's one issue with these aforementioned --- Quantum computers. It's true that at the moment we're largely in the research phases of building quantum computers, but it's NOT far off. A decade perhaps; and that's not even taking into account that the government/black operations may already have this technology at the ready. It's a sad thing that so much of this emerging technology will be used to do evil things, but history so far has shown that our evolution is a double-edged sword.

The elite megalomaniacs have, and will, vastly enjoy exploiting the scientist/engineers' discoveries and creations.


Originally posted by VoidHawk

Now suppose we were to send our email as an image with those squiggles in the background!! This would prevent them from scanning the emails, they'd have to have a human to read each and every email sent.




Originally posted by XeroOne
Okay, the system as outline in the Channel 4 article isn't going to work, and here's why:

First, if there's a HTTPS/SSL connection to the server, neither the message or email addresses could be scanned or decrypted in real time. Yes, it's possible to decrypt the traffic, but even with a massive supercomputing facility that could take months for just one message.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:15 AM
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Will only allow eavesdropping of non-criminals, despite the argument that this is to catch/prosecute criminals. As usual, the attacks on general privacy continue -- criminals will take the few extra steps necessary to keep their communication and data private.
edit on 7/1/2012 by AkumaStreak because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by 11235813213455
This capability has been around for a while. Educate yourself on CALEA

And take it from someone who used to set this up for ISP's. They got you if they want you. Encryption doesnt save you. You hook into your ISP's network your data is theirs the second it leaves the NID.
edit on 30-6-2012 by 11235813213455 because: (no reason given)


CALEA allows for automatic decryption?



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


Fluke makes a protocol analyzer that pretty much does the same thing and it can fit in the palm of your hand.

2nd.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 01:37 AM
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If all the traffic is being routed through 1 point, if that point goes down, unintentionally or intentionally, doesn't that mean everyone loses service?



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 01:55 AM
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Just some information to think about - just because general society has access to all things to do with computers what makes people think that the marketplace has 'everything' that is available. We live in a world where the elite keep many secrets and hide much from society.

Just think about the fact that what is on offer in the 'marketplace' may not be the most up to date technology. What society has in the 'marketplace' is merely what the cabal/illuminati/whatever have permitted to be available.

Monitoring of phones and computers is well and truly established - only most people are unaware and post all sorts of personal information on the internet - makes the work of the government operatives as easy as taking a dummy from a baby.

Much Peace...



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:18 AM
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Just to clarify, I was referring to transport layer encryption - the stuff that encrypts the actual connection itself. Say you're accessing Gmail over HTTPS and you've checked that it's the Gmail server you're communicating with, the only way anyone can read your emails is by asking Google for them, whether packet inspection's used or not. Although you could also protect against this using GPG.

This black box thing is only going to catch the low-hanging fruit - people who aren't using any encryption whatsoever.

It's not a case of the 'Illuminati' or 'The Elite' having access to special technology we don't know about. The people in charge need to buy the equipment and expertise from somewhere. From what I've seen, surveillance vendors have moved onto selling rootkits, so we could safely assume the increasing use of encrypted comms has thrown a spanner in the works.


edit on 1-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:20 AM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


lol... only in the UK. Get out while you still can!!!!



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 



This black box thing is only going to catch the low-hanging fruit - people who aren't using any encryption whatsoever.

Actually the article makes it sound like large companies such as Facebook and Google will be supplying the decryption keys to the UK Government. If that weren't the case then you're completely right, they wouldn't be able to decrypt the messages without attempting to crack the encryption via brute force, which obviously would require an infeasible amount of computing power. So the fact that they are admitting this black box will have the ability to decrypt messages from Facebook and Gmail is clear evidence that these companies will be providing them with the information necessary to decrypt the messages. But for any services which they don't have the keys to, obviously you are correct, they will not be able to decrypt those communications.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:46 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by XeroOne
 



This black box thing is only going to catch the low-hanging fruit - people who aren't using any encryption whatsoever.

Actually the article makes it sound like large companies such as Facebook and Google will be supplying the decryption keys to the UK Government.


That's a possibility, but the problem is SSL was designed to prevent this by randomly generating the keys at both ends while the connection's established, and then using that to exchange another key using public key encryption.
It's quite possible Google and FaceBook could provide the government with their SSL cerrtificates, so users think they're establishing a session with the servers themselves instead of a black box.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:54 AM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 



That's a possibility, but the problem is SSL was designed to prevent this by randomly generating the keys at both ends while the connection's established, and then using that to exchange another key using public key encryption.
Hmmm.... that is a good point.


It's quite possible Google and FaceBook could provide the government with their SSL cerrtificates, so users think they're establishing a session with the servers themselves instead of a black box.
But that would defeat the whole purpose of a SSL certificate.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 03:17 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by XeroOne
 



That's a possibility, but the problem is SSL was designed to prevent this by randomly generating the keys at both ends while the connection's established, and then using that to exchange another key using public key encryption.
Hmmm.... that is a good point.


It's quite possible Google and FaceBook could provide the government with their SSL cerrtificates, so users think they're establishing a session with the servers themselves instead of a black box.
But that would defeat the whole purpose of a SSL certificate.


Exactly. And if the SSL/certificate model is proven that insecure, the certificate authorities are out of business, and e-commerce falls apart. They're only in business purely because they're a 'Trusted Authority'. Google could very well lose its corporate users if there's a breach resulting from a black box being hacked.

Come to think of it, that's also rather unlikely. The DNS should point your browser straight at the server anyway.

edit on 1-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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They have all of this already.
This is just for show to keep you all scared.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 04:37 AM
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Why are you guys over in the UK so f*** up over there in terms of surveillance? I just do see how it has moved that far.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 04:38 AM
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Theres so many ways of bypassing stuff like this that the main thing it will do is keep the spooks in jobs chasing shadows but if they want to read my emails they can but it'll keep em entertained having to wade through 1000's of viagra/willy extension emails etc



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 05:49 AM
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You can encrypt your own data yourself if you want it to remain private. There are several encryption algorithms out there that haven't been cracked.



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