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'Black boxes' to monitor all internet and phone data

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posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by XeroOne
 



'I'm pretty sure they're well protected against that kind of naughtiness.'

let's hope so!


'That was actually one of the intentions behind the National Identity Register which the New Labour government tried ramming through. A database that centralised all that would have been subject to numerous security risks, both insider and external, which was why I campaigned against it at the time.'


i tip my hat to you.

f.




posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by stanguilles7
 


echelon was developed to listen in to the russians. do you think it is limited to just the russians ?

the point is obvious

by the time we get wind of any surveillance technology, it's about a decade too late



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by syrinx high priest
reply to post by stanguilles7
 


echelon was developed to listen in to the russians. do you think it is limited to just the russians ?

the point is obvious

by the time we get wind of any surveillance technology, it's about a decade too late


Be that as it may, it appeared rather obvious your comment was little more than drive by, since you clearly didnt know this was not in the US, or the extent of the type of methods being employed.

You're just feigning enlightenment, so to speak. "Oh, i know everything".



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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I love how this is all being gradually phased in via all avenues possible. Just like Progressive INsuarance's new little "plug and play" device that monitors and transmits your driving behavior and patterns. It's sold as a device to save you money from the company founded by Peter B Lewis. A chief player from the progressive left.

That device could easily be used to contact the police if it senses erratic driving or excessive speed or if you're cruising a neighborhood that does not fit your "profile". Watch out drug shoppers ha ha ha.



posted on Jul, 2 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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The purpose of this Bill, therefore, is to protect the public and bring offenders to justice by ensuring that communications data is available to the police and security and intelligence agencies in future as it has been in the past. I recognise that these proposals raise important issues around personal privacy. This Government is committed to ensuring that here, as elsewhere, we strike the right balance between protecting the public and safeguarding civil liberties.

I believe that there are compelling reasons for the provisions in this Bill and want to ensure that they are fully considered and understood before we commence the formal legislative process. It is for that reason that we are submitting the Bill to formal pre-legislative scrutiny by a Joint Committee of both Houses.

The Intelligence and Security Committee will in parallel conduct an inquiry into the proposals. We will consider very carefully the reports by the Joint Committee, and the Intelligence and Security Committee before introducing the Bill in Parliament later in the session.

THERESA MAY


Communications Data Bill

It's all there in black and white. And since these kind of documents are worded so vague and open to interpretation the government can do whatever they like. They just love using the old draconian language because it allows them to get away with pretty much anything since the average person is befuddled by the draconian circular logic.

Score 1 for the Elite.



posted on Jul, 3 2012 @ 07:21 PM
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Originally posted by Tindalos2013
It's all there in black and white. And since these kind of documents are worded so vague and open to interpretation the government can do whatever they like. They just love using the old draconian language because it allows them to get away with pretty much anything since the average person is befuddled by the draconian circular logic.

Score 1 for the Elite.


Nah, what they have there is a proposal on a bit of paper, which in all likelihood they only have the vaguest idea of how to implement, and it's still questionable whether it can be done in practice. Normally it's after legislation gets passed the ministers run up against serious problems.
Take the Digital Economy Act 2010 as an example - it was passed on the assumption that individuals could be identified by an IP address, when technically they can't, and that was later confirmed by case law.

Score 0.5 for the Elite.
edit on 3-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder

Originally posted by SilentKoala
You can encrypt your own data yourself if you want it to remain private. There are several encryption algorithms out there that haven't been cracked.

Yes you can encrypt data... but how do you suppose one might encrypt a http connection to a website when the server obviously wont understand the protocols or data you are sending it? The only safe websites will be https websites, assuming the Government doesn't have some way to compromise the SLL certificates... and it sounds like they are working on ways to do that for large services such as Facebook and Gmail.
edit on 1/7/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)


I mean if you want to communicate with someone and have the conversation remain private. You can write a chat client using your own encryption algorithm and just send it to whoever you want to communicate wtih. Obviously not an option for visiting web sites, but you can use Tor for that. Btw, while HTTPS can't be "cracked", it can still be decrypted if they hacked the server and got access to the private key. Wouldn't surprise me if they had a database of private keys for most https web sites, given how long it took to disccover the Flame virus, who knows what other malware they have lurking about.



posted on Jul, 4 2012 @ 08:19 PM
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I have one on my line. They aren't very good at it yet, so I'm sure concerns about their use are warranted.




posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by SibylofErythrae
I have one on my line. They aren't very good at it yet, so I'm sure concerns about their use are warranted.



please elaborate...



posted on Jul, 5 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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If there is a system like Echelon, why wouldn't there be a similar one for the Internet?
edit on 5-7-2012 by SibylofErythrae because: edit for clarity.



posted on Jul, 11 2012 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by SibylofErythrae
If there is a system like Echelon, why wouldn't there be a similar one for the Internet?
edit on 5-7-2012 by SibylofErythrae because: edit for clarity.


Mainly because it's next to impossible with the unimaginable amount of crap going across the wires. Think about it: at any given moment there are billions of pointless status updates, millions of office emails going across WANs, spam, tens of thousands of automated port scans, banner ads, online gaming, etc. A large portion of this (if not most) is encrypted.
There's way too much data to sift through, even if they picked out traffic containing certain keywords. Echelon was built in an age when a tiny minority were communicating over long distances.

The bottom line is they couldn't even begin to take the same approach with Internet communications, or warehouse data about the traffic. Nothing has the resources to do this.
edit on 11-7-2012 by XeroOne because: (no reason given)



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