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No Hands = No Rides

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posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 08:31 AM
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Apparently, if you have no hands, you're not allowed to ride amusement park rides.

video.msnbc.msn.com...

I never really thought about it before. I guess if it was a new-amputee, there could be some serious safety issues, but someone who has spent their entire life without something learns to compensate in other ways.
There was another story from Feb, as well articles.nydailynews.com...

I can see the side of the amusement parks because there are set safety rules, but can also see the side of those who weren't able to ride, since they've faced this their entire life and have found ways to compensate. ...maybe having them sign a waiver upon entering the park or something could suffice? (and yes, they can write, even without hands, so don't troll on that)




posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


Public liabilities mate. If something were to happen to said amputee (new or experienced) in a litigious world.. Lawyers would be all over that business like a cheap suit. I can understand why they have those rules for the rides...

IRM



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by InfaRedMan
reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


Public liabilities mate. If something were to happen to said amputee (new or experienced) in a litigious world.. Lawyers would be all over that business like a cheap suit. I can understand why they have those rules for the rides...

IRM


You have a point there, they'd definitely be all over it.
Maybe the parks should get signed waivers from everybody who comes... but the lawyers would still find a way to take it to court.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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Without hands life has got to be amusing on its own, don't you think?



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:13 AM
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It's for their own safety (which is the park's responsibility), it's not discriminatory. It's a bit unfair and it's sad for the people that can't ride, but it's for the right reasons and there's nothing that can be done. Even though someone may have a lot of experience with their disability, they still have a huge disadvantage in potential dangerous situations.
edit on 13-6-2012 by SpearMint because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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Amusement parks have the weirdest rules sometimes. There was a ride that my daughter wanted to ride with her dad that involved sitting in a seat attached to cables that swung around - not too terribly scary or death-defying. The rule was that to have an adult sit with the child, the child had to be below a certain height. My daughter was above that height requirement, so she couldn't sit with her dad. When asked if she could sit with another child, we were told no. So, there was no way she could ride this ride. But, we saw children much younger (and shorter) than her riding this ride with their parents. ???? So, the ride was safe for an adult to ride it, and it was safe for a short child to ride it, but it wasn't safe for a tall child to ride it with an adult. What??



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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Yeah but they should be able to have just as much fun like the rest of us. Isn't that sort like discriminating against their handicap?
edit on 13-6-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 09:43 AM
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Originally posted by Manhater
Yeah but they should be able to have just as much fun like the rest of us. Isn't that sort like discriminating against their handicap?
edit on 13-6-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)


yeah, they should. That's why I mentioned a waiver...
Would it be possible to have some type of safety accessory that they would just take with them in events like this that are approved by someone or something? I guess it would have to be custom made and approved though. Who would have to give approval for something like that?



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 04:28 AM
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What about prosthetic hands, or hooks?

Would they be allowed to ride then?



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 04:47 AM
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I love amusement parks, but the fact is they are not as safe as some would have you believe. I can think of 2 occasions off the top of my head where having hands saved me or someone else from serious injury or death.

Fact is those safety belts/ bars are not always very safe and they do malfunction. Last time I was at a Park (Ceder Point in Ohio) we went on this roller coaster. My buddy was fastened in with the safety bar pulled down over his head. Shortly after the ride started moving, he realized it was not clicked into place properly and his "safety bar" came undone after the first turn. Luckily there was no loops on this roller coaster, cause my buddy spent the whole ride, right next to me, holding on for his life.

I would imagine this happens more often than people know. So in this case, I would not be so quick to scream "discrimination", but I would also not expect anyone to admit you may have to save yourself and hang on for dear life. That would be a PR nightmare.




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