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Theory to produce electric current from magnet with no moving parts

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posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 10:32 PM
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I think I have figured out a flaw in the conventional wisdom that you need a moving magnetic field to generate a current. Col. Tom Bearden's Cheniere Press has published (a while ago now) a booklet called the Secret World of Mangets by Howard Johnson, who is a master of understanding how magnets really work.

In his booklet, he shows with pictures, that lines of magnetic force, that emerge from the north pole, do not just flow straight down to the south pole but in fact rotate around the magnet at the same time. If you have a horseshoe magnet, then the lines of force flowing between the poles, also rotates so that the lines of force rise up on one side then cross over the top and fall down the other side like a rotating tube.

Now if there was a stationary copper wire positioned such that it passes thru the lines of force of a horseshoe magnet, no current is generated because the lines of force intersecting the wire on one side from one direction, would generate current that would be exactly counter-balanced by the current generated by the lines of force on the opposite side hitting the wire from the opposite direction.

If the wire is moved, then the impact from both sides of the rotating lines of force are no longer balanced. For example, let's assume that the lines of force are rotating in a clockwise direction and that the wire is moving upward. Therefore on the right side of the magnetic 'tube' the wire is encountering more lines of force as those lines of force drop down to meet the rising wire. On the left side, the wire is 'chasing' the lines of force which are moving in the same direction as the wire. Therefore the opposing forces are imbalanced and a current is produced.

This proves that the lines of force are rotating because if they weren't, the moving wire would be encountering equal amounts of lines of force on both sides.

So here is my idea. What if the copper 'wire' wasn't of uniform shape? ie. suppose you had a piece of copper that is triangular shaped. If you insert it into the rotating lines of force, then more of the lines of force would come into contact with the wider part of the triangle compared with the narrower part. What I'm conjecturing is that wider contact has the same impact as contact with more lines of force. Therefore opposing forces would not be in balance and current would be sent in one direction even though the copper triangle isn't moving.

I have not tested this theory. Anyone wanting to try it is welcome to do so. This idea is in the public domain for the benefit of all.




posted on Jun, 10 2012 @ 11:46 PM
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It's good that you're thinking about it!
That method wouldn't produce results because the overall field would add up to zero over the surface area as far as the unbalanced forces.
With the ideas you mentioned, you would need to find a way to suspend the copper object in the field so it's not experiencing the entire field, but of course, since it conducts magnetism, getting it close is going to alter the magnetic field as well as the rotation...
not a bad idea at all though, good example of using your thinking skills

Keep thinking, you may come up with a very creative solution!



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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Thank but a link would be neice
save us all the trouble of having to google it


peswiki.com...:Howard_Johnson

aias.us...

freeenergynews.com...

edit on 11-6-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


I'm not sure if I understand your point. Here is a variant of my original idea. Instead of one uniform wire cutting the lines of force how about using a wire that splits into two wires in a 'Y' configuration? inserting this into the lines of force from a horseshoe magnet would mean that one side of the rotating lines of force would be cut by two wires from the same direction while the opposite side's lines of force are only cut by one wire. I think that the current generated by the two wires (in parallel) would overpower the current being sent in the opposite direction by the single wire.



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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It sounds like you have a good idea. It would be simple to make an experiment and verify your hypothesis.



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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Work with voltage and the electric field because its loss less unless you make
a current. Magnetism implies moving current and will go against Maxwell Equations
and we have enough law breakers against Newton and momentum now days to
contend with. With voltage you can build up more and more in a store house to have
more than you might even need. I can see where the permanent magnet has amazed
mankind as to where the current is but perhaps the loss less atom fields are the cause
and thus make the voltage case even more understandable.

Ed: Wonder how that Johnson motor performs because once rotating with a load heating will
begin and magnets will no longer be permanent. An unbalanced current in a triangle wire
from a permanent magnet seems similar to any closed path.
Ed: And thanks for posting this interesting motor patent and flux idea. I think I briefly
heard of this motor.

edit on 6/11/2012 by TeslaandLyne because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by Matt1951
 

I have no idea what any of htis is about, but experimentation is the next stage for the OP.

So you created the idea, why not go further and try to apply it?

You have the smarts to come this far, so why stop now? Don't you have a few bucks?

Note: I'm speaking to the OP, not Matt1951.
edit on 11-6-2012 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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I think what you have just described is an electric motor.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by Studenofhistory
reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


I'm not sure if I understand your point. Here is a variant of my original idea. Instead of one uniform wire cutting the lines of force how about using a wire that splits into two wires in a 'Y' configuration? inserting this into the lines of force from a horseshoe magnet would mean that one side of the rotating lines of force would be cut by two wires from the same direction while the opposite side's lines of force are only cut by one wire. I think that the current generated by the two wires (in parallel) would overpower the current being sent in the opposite direction by the single wire.


The sum force would still be zero, so no current would be produced. remember that the wires must be connected to something for the current to flow. .. you could try it to verify if you like though, maybe it will lead you to something else by going through the process.



posted on Jun, 12 2012 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


Why would the sum force still be zero? Two wires cutting lines of force from the same direction versus one wire cutting lines of force from the opposite direction and you're saying there's no net imbalance in the circuit? That makes no sense.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 06:55 AM
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This proposal is lacking a vital ingredient IE there has to be some relative motion between the field & the conductor in order to get any EMF induced. Even with an imbalance the field is still static so no output apart from a momentary spike from when magnetic field is introduced or removed (due to the relative motion). This sounds like an attempt to reverse engineer a DC solenoid where the only thing in motion is the current in the conductor.

To get energy out you need to apply at least that much by creating that motion of the field, conductor or both and there need not be any moving mechanical parts eg as in a transformer where all that moves is the field. All fun stuff to play with though and very educational.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by Studenofhistory
 

A wire with an electronic current generates it's only magnetic field. So if you have two wires with flowing current and a magnet, you have 3 magnet fields to deal with.

If you take a magnet and drop it through a tube with a coil of wire wrapped around it, it'll drop more slowly if the coil of wire is connected vs disconnected.



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by Studenofhistory
reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


Why would the sum force still be zero? Two wires cutting lines of force from the same direction versus one wire cutting lines of force from the opposite direction and you're saying there's no net imbalance in the circuit? That makes no sense.


It would be a "one time thing" and as soon as that one tiny force ran its path, that would be the end of it. It has to be continually applied via motion in order to produce a flowing current. The wire or piece of copper would essentially become part of the magnet so to speak.




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