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Ancient plague may have helped humans evolve

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posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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I spotted this earlier today and thought somebody would have posted it already but it hasn't been so. I thought this was an interesting read for those who are interested in this type of stuff as I.

The question becomes could something like this happen again in our modern world? Are plagues a critical part in our development as a species?

Do we owe who we are to a little bug so to speak?

Ancient plague may have helped humans evolve

One of the major factors that saved humanity from extinction some 100,000 years ago may lie in our ancestor's ability to protect themselves from massive epidemic of bacterial diseases, according to a new research led by an Indian-origin scientist.

A team led by Ajit Varki of the University of California, San Diego, found new genetic evidence which suggests that a mysterious plague ravaged populations of early humans in Africa, until their number fell to less than 10,000.

The bacteria were exploiting two immune system genes. So the solution was to get rid of the traitorous genes. And those who managed to survive the epidemic, bounced back and started spreading around the world, the NewScientist.Com reported.

For their study....

edit on 6-6-2012 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Long time no see buddy
Good to see you post up again less I've missed ya on the boards.

anyways.. haven't read the full article but, the my first I thought of was War of the Worlds (w/ Tom Cruise) how at the end it was the bacteria that was their downfall..yea.. technically, it's a 'sci-fi' movie, but, according to the spinet of the article, definitely rings a bit of truth.

Gonna check out the full write up; something to ponder



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by Komodo
 


Good to see you as well.
I've been posting but not many threads. I'm glad you found this interesting



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
I spotted this earlier today and thought somebody would have posted it already but it hasn't been so. I thought this was an interesting read for those who are interested in this type of stuff as I.

The question becomes could something like this happen again in our modern world? Are plagues a critical part in our development s a species?

Do we owe who we are to a little bug so to speak?

Ancient plague may have helped humans evolve

TOne of the major factors that saved humanity from extinction some 100,000 years ago may lie in our ancestor's ability to protect themselves from massive epidemic of bacterial diseases, according to a new research led by an Indian-origin scientist.

A team led by Ajit Varki of the University of California, San Diego, found new genetic evidence which suggests that a mysterious plague ravaged populations of early humans in Africa, until their number fell to less than 10,000.

The bacteria were exploiting two immune system genes. So the solution was to get rid of the traitorous genes. And those who managed to survive the epidemic, bounced back and started spreading around the world, the NewScientist.Com reported.

For their study....


Sounds like something a highly technologically advanced civilization would use against humans to remove those that posed a threat to them.



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 04:45 PM
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I wonder if there is a pic of it we could see?

The strain of course, be cool to see a ancient virus....or would it?
edit on 6-6-2012 by mytheroy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 04:45 PM
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Possible theory could be that when humanity reaches a certain 'breaking point' that our bodies release a plague or other pandemic to curb population levels so that the Earth can keep an ecological balance. Merely speculation, obviously.


There is some merit to that... a lower population would lead to higher quality of life for those that lived. HOWEVER, I in no way advocate depopulation, but rather that we improve the lives of the people who are already here.

Nice find as usual.



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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That is what i was thinking as well human evolution has built in mechanisms to "weed out" the lesser gene pool, and when that occurs the species becomes stronger, and this has happened for thousands of years.

Not now tho with the invention of modern medicine that natural evolution is longer happening, more or less a "stagnation" of human development.

Nature had it's design man has his own are we better off now for it?

Yes and No.

The environment determines evolution and now man is changing the environment to suit himself today we have been pumped so full of un natural things no one truly knows the evolutionary effects that future generations will face.


edit on 6-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


We have changed and adapted to suit our ever changing environment IMO.



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I can agree with that but at the same time bacteria,and virus's are now become resistant to modern medicine's which means one can only fend off mother nature for so long.


edit on 6-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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For all we know, it could have been one of our, now present, normal flora in our bodies. Perhaps we evolved to peacefully coexist with the invader. Think about it, human bodies are chock full of bacteria, yeasts, and fungi. And thay never harm us unless our immune systems are weakened by something else.

This brings up something interesting. How did our digestion operate before E. Coli came along?
edit on 6-6-2012 by elouina because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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How about the theory of panspermia?

Organism from space which on occasion safely make it down to the Earth's surface take hold and multiply. Could be where we have inherited so much supposed "Junk DNA" from...

edit on 6-6-2012 by SLAYER69 because: Spelling



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:36 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I can agree with that but at the same time bacteria,and virus's are now become resistant to modern medicine's which means one can only fend off mother nature for so long.


edit on 6-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



The ones we know of and have been exposed to you mean..?


It's only a matter of time until some R & D company bulldozes the wrong forest and unleashes a nasty virus/bacteria...hell, it may have already happened.





posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by facelift
 


All joking aside that is about the scariest and realistic possibility in our modern word since we are going ever deeper into the jungles and forests for more resources couple that with our modern world of rapid global travel...

Zombies?



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by facelift

Originally posted by neo96
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I can agree with that but at the same time bacteria,and virus's are now become resistant to modern medicine's which means one can only fend off mother nature for so long.


edit on 6-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



The ones we know of and have been exposed to you mean..?


It's only a matter of time until some R & D company bulldozes the wrong forest and unleashes a nasty virus/bacteria...hell, it may have already happened.




Well if many means always evolving who says disease doesn't evolve right along with him and there is always the mutation factor.

Most likely there is a lot just laying dormant everywhere not just the "rain forest".
edit on 6-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by neo96


Depopulation won't be a nuclear war, it will be mother nature saying "FU humans, take this!".


We let it hapen on our watch, so we have it coming IMO.
edit on 6-6-2012 by 40luv because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by 40luv
reply to post by neo96


Depopulation won't be a nuclear war, it will be mother nature saying "FU humans, take this!".


We let it hapen on our watch, so we have it coming IMO.
edit on 6-6-2012 by 40luv because: (no reason given)


Too bad mankind couldn't spend the money from defense funds on eradication of simple viruses and bacteria. As long as they are around mutation is going to happen. We likely could have accomplshed this, but there is no money in for someone. Just the good of all mankind, that's all.



posted on Jun, 6 2012 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 





couple that with our modern world of rapid global travel...


At least earlier plagues were isolated to geographic areas. I would think the next "super bug", one resistant to typical treatments, would spread VERY rapidly. I can envision one that would seemingly occur simultaneously in multiple countries.

Is there a contingency plan for a world wide outbreak?






posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by 40luv
 


I've often posted the same sentiment but not nearly as accurate and colorful as you.



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by facelift

Originally posted by neo96
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I can agree with that but at the same time bacteria,and virus's are now become resistant to modern medicine's which means one can only fend off mother nature for so long.


edit on 6-6-2012 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



The ones we know of and have been exposed to you mean..?


It's only a matter of time until some R & D company bulldozes the wrong forest and unleashes a nasty virus/bacteria...hell, it may have already happened.




It would have to be a virus as we already have a means to kill any and all bacteria with 0% chance that immunity will be developed. It will wipe out 100% of all non animal cells, bacterial, fungal, only virus are immune to it. I want to be lazy, but let me see if I can find the research.

ETA: Apparently they have a breakthrough for viral infections as well. From MIT.

New drug could cure nearly any viral infection

Researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Lab have developed technology that may someday cure the common cold, influenza and other ailments.

web.mit.edu...

ETA2: Also from Massachusetts, UMASS, anything with a cell membrane that is not animal, this will kill.
www.polymedix.com...
edit on 7-6-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-6-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2012 @ 03:00 AM
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Originally posted by facelift
The ones we know of and have been exposed to you mean..?


It's only a matter of time until some R & D company bulldozes the wrong forest and unleashes a nasty virus/bacteria...hell, it may have already happened.




Even the ones that we have been exposed to...Ebola springs to mind...but so far, that has been contained sufficiently to avoid mutating to other forms of dispersal I would gather. Nasty way to go.

I was listening to a radio programme a couple of years ago though with a couple of epidemiologists discussing how they fully expect there to be 'reservoirs' of viruses, and that, in their opinion, this represented, if not viruses in general, the greatest threat to our future. However, in the same breath, they acknowledged recent studies that suggested that viruses and bacterially driven disease was responsible for a good part of our evolutionary success, or rather 'hardiness'...but then that applies to most species that have succeeded, selection of the fittest...actually wasn't there the discovery a few years ago that much of our 'junk' DNA is made up of viral material that has been assimilated...I'm not sure, off the top of my head...

Either way, I am reminded of all those threads from a couple of years ago about rhesus negative blood types and comets packing viral loads in their tails...



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