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Georgia Opens Jail Devoted To U.S. Veterans

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posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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Georgia Opens Jail Devoted To U.S. Veterans


govtslaves.info

The problem of US military veterans falling into a life of crime after returning from Iraq and Afghanistan has reached such levels that a law enforcer in Georgia has opened what is believed to be America’s first county jail devoted to veteran inmates.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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Thank you for your service! Now go to jail!

I am against the unjust Middle East wars but I have nothing but respect for men and women who serve their country.

Too bad their country doesn't seem to feel the same way! Treats them like disposable pieces of meat, so that after they come home, they often lack the financial and psychological support they so clearly need. Lacking these things, they fall into a life of crime...apparently in such large numbers they need special incarceration units!

To be fair, it sounds like the new jail is an attempt to help vets rather than single them out for punishment. I guess the theory goes that they carry different problems than normal criminals, and that a special facility will help them brake the cycle of recidivism.

But we have to question why such a thing is necessary in the first place! I'm not coming up with reassuring answers, ATS.

Only in America...

govtslaves.info
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:53 PM
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it does sound bad but after reading about it, this could be a step in the right direction.

Whats more shocking for me is seeing vets that are homeless after coming back from war, or just unable to find a normal job. I would kind of take it that they would come back and maybe mess up once or twice in terms of assault or terroristic threathenings. It's kinda ineviteably with all the PTSD that some people will come back violent.

of course a solution would be to stop sending our troops overseas into warzones with no clear boundaries when we are capable or winning a war easier with our missles alone but thats not ganna happen unless ron paul gets elected.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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Could it be because those guys have the ability to organize and fight?
Keep them away from the sheeple or the sheeple might learn.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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This is why President Obama recently spoke (see video) about getting Veterans back into the Education system to pick up a new job versus a new weapon.




posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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Honestly, jailing them separate from other prisoners could be a show of respect toward the soldiers. Jailing them with standard prisoners could be asking for trouble.

Just because one was a soldier does not mean they are immune from the laws when they return. Perhaps this is about keeping them separate, because so many of them need psychological help, and this way, they can get it.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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Maybe this jail can offer more targeted services to the veterans than they would receive at a regular prison. If that's the case, then I think this is a great idea.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Honestly, jailing them separate from other prisoners could be a show of respect toward the soldiers. Jailing them with standard prisoners could be asking for trouble.

Just because one was a soldier does not mean they are immune from the laws when they return. Perhaps this is about keeping them separate, because so many of them need psychological help, and this way, they can get it.



This is a problem in the making special prisons for a "special group" of American civilians? I can understand the logic of separating men and women but vets and non vets? I see this leading to a case of "separate but equal” treatment for prisoners. Isolating these prisoners outside society in their own “group” creates another level of separation and does nothing to integrate them into society.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Honestly, jailing them separate from other prisoners could be a show of respect toward the soldiers. Jailing them with standard prisoners could be asking for trouble.

Just because one was a soldier does not mean they are immune from the laws when they return. Perhaps this is about keeping them separate, because so many of them need psychological help, and this way, they can get it.



This is a problem in the making special prisons for a "special group" of American civilians? I can understand the logic of separating men and women but vets and non vets? I see this leading to a case of "separate but equal” treatment for prisoners. Isolating these prisoners outside society in their own “group” creates another level of separation and does nothing to integrate them into society.


I get what you are saying, but there is a separation when it comes to vets. Most are suffering from some sort of psychological trauma. Most need psychological help.

Its not a matter that they should be treated better, but if you have a way to get this group the treatment that they need, why wouldnt you? Isnt jail supposed to be about reform?



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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The private prison sytem in the US is NOT about rehabilitation, the time to help the vets was before they got into trouble.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by Danbones
The private prison sytem in the US is NOT about rehabilitation, the time to help the vets was before they got into trouble.



Exactly...


They do NOT need a new goddamn facility...


What they need is a better transition program from Soldier to civilian. What good are these skill sets in prison..? They need to be given these tools prior to reentering society. There is already a program in place in the military for when you ETS, but it's watered down and overloaded...


If the government can send you to war, they should also be partially, if not fully, accountable for your actions afterwards...if not, then give the branches the required resources to remedy this situation.


Stupid gov't...





posted on May, 7 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots

Originally posted by fnpmitchreturns

Originally posted by captaintyinknots
Honestly, jailing them separate from other prisoners could be a show of respect toward the soldiers. Jailing them with standard prisoners could be asking for trouble.

Just because one was a soldier does not mean they are immune from the laws when they return. Perhaps this is about keeping them separate, because so many of them need psychological help, and this way, they can get it.



This is a problem in the making special prisons for a "special group" of American civilians? I can understand the logic of separating men and women but vets and non vets? I see this leading to a case of "separate but equal” treatment for prisoners. Isolating these prisoners outside society in their own “group” creates another level of separation and does nothing to integrate them into society.


I get what you are saying, but there is a separation when it comes to vets. Most are suffering from some sort of psychological trauma. Most need psychological help.

Its not a matter that they should be treated better, but if you have a way to get this group the treatment that they need, why wouldnt you? Isnt jail supposed to be about reform?


Your are correct when talking about the mental health issues of veterans. I understand this is about helping them but it is still illegal when it comes to"equal treatment under the law" for prisoner care.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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There
I just heard on INN news that the same panel that decided a year ago that the VA s treatment of the troops that creates the problen addressed in the OP was un constitutional and should be totally revemped just reversed itself and now says that this revamp is unconstitutional.

A revamp of the system responsible for the vets plight has to be ordered by the president or congress.

time to step up to the plate Casey at bat



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknotsI get what you are saying, but there is a separation when it comes to vets. Most are suffering from some sort of psychological trauma. Most need psychological help.

Its not a matter that they should be treated better, but if you have a way to get this group the treatment that they need, why wouldnt you? Isnt jail supposed to be about reform?


This is true but its also the same for the general prison population.



posted on May, 7 2012 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by Leftist
 


I addressed a similar issue in a thread about veteran's courts.

My main issue was; if these programs are so successful for veterans, why not expand them for all convicts, regardless of their service status.



John Darr, the sheriff of Muscogee County in Columbus, Georgia, has created the new facility in an attempt to break the cycle of recidivism by providing them with specialist services to help them deal with the problems they carry with them when they decamp.

“It’s really unique. What we’re bringing together is a lot of resources,” Darr told the local Columbus Ledger-Enquirer.

Among the partnerships that are being set up is a link to Veterans Court, a community group that works with veterans in prison suffering from mental illness. The new dormitory, that will house 16 incarcerated veterans, will also provide those soon to be released with advice and support as they transition back into the community.


Helping the vets is all well and good but, if the methods used for veterans are so effective, shouldn't we at least try them for the general population as well?

It seems that in the US, we gave up on rehabilitating prisoners years ago.


On January 18, 1989, the abandonment of rehabilitation in corrections was confirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court. In Mistretta v. United States, the Court upheld federal "sentencing guidelines" which remove rehabilitation from serious consideration when sentencing offenders. Defendants will henceforth be sentenced strictly for the crime, with no recognition given to such factors as amenability to treatment, personal and family history, previous efforts to rehabilitate oneself, or possible alternatives to prison. The Court outlined the history of the debate: "Rehabilitation as a sound penological theory came to be questioned and, in any event, was regarded by some as an unattainable goal for most cases." The Court cited a Senate Report which "referred to the 'outmoded rehabilitation model' for federal criminal sentencing, and recognized that the efforts of the criminal justice system to achieve rehabilitation of offenders had failed."

Prison Policy

Why is it we think our veterans will have any better results? Are we fooling ourselves into thinking they will do better or were we wrong in our initial assessment that said rehabilitation had failed?

I think they were wrong in their initial assessment and, if we were just to invest the time and money, an effective system of rehabilitation could be worked out in this country. The veteran's court system proves that rehabilitation can work.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by Nephlim
 


U.S soldiers are some of the most rewarded and coddled in the world. If they fail in civilian life it is their own damn fault. Any way all this really means is that once soldiers are done with service they should wear a chip so that they can be monitored for their own safety. I also don't trust the OP as they are a self described leftist and could have spun the story any damn way they liked.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:26 AM
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I hardly think the programs will be what they are on the surface. Special re-training facility, M'Kultra, you name it.

The money spent could be best be spent in social programs and adequate free housing.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:33 AM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
I hardly think the programs will be what they are on the surface. Special re-training facility, M'Kultra, you name it.

The money spent could be best be spent in social programs and adequate free housing.


If half of the defense budget were to be invested into free housing it would not solve a damn thing.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:33 AM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
I hardly think the programs will be what they are on the surface. Special re-training facility, M'Kultra, you name it.

The money spent could be best be spent in social programs and adequate free housing.


If half of the defense budget were to be invested into free housing it would not solve a damn thing.



posted on May, 8 2012 @ 09:36 AM
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that would be half the dead around the world in places like iraq afgahanistan and uganda
and soon to be in battlefield america
thats solving something
edit on 8-5-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



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