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Grand Master of a Mason Lodge

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posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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I think most of us here have heard of or, researched the topic of the secret societies.

The Masonic Lodge seems to be a bit of a hot topic on this site and I've read from some posts/threads that there are a few masonic lodge members that are also members of ATS.

Having said that, I've never really researched, in detail, the whole Masonic mystery (If there even is one). But, I've always had a mild interest and somewhat of a fascination with the whole secret society "thing". I think it really started when I first saw the movie "Skull and Bones"....just kidding!!!

I've read some threads about the good and the bad and the ugly of the Masons but, I honestly cannot form an opinion on a topic in which I have no direct knowledge or experience.

Here is where I begin to get to the point:

I've learned that I have a relative who is a prominent member of the local Masonic Lodge. It's not a huge "discovery" for me but, one that peaked my interest when I heard that he was once the Grand Master.

Can anyone here explain to me what this entails... what are the Grand Master's responsibilities? Who places them in such a position?

Thanks




posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 

The Grand Lodge governs the Lodges of their own State or Provincial jurisdiction having no authority over other jurisdictions although they may be in Amity. A Past Grand Master is a Mason who served his Lodge as a Worshipful Master, as a senior member of the fraternity he is entitled to participate in Grand Lodge, determining which other Grand Lodges or Orients they recognize and allow visitation, voting on motions that affect the government of the Lodges, and electing Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, and Junior Grand Warden to lead the GL for the term. The Grand Master appoints the remaining officers. Therefore, he was placed in the position of MWGM by none other than his brethren who held him in high esteem.
edit on 24-4-2012 by no1smootha because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


He was elected by his peers to the grand lodge level, then he spent the time and effort to go through all the chairs of the grand lodge and became Grand Master of his state. It's a huge honor and a very big deal. He had not only the respect of the masons in his lodge, but the respect of the masons in his state as well. It's the highest elected position in masonry.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 07:20 AM
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Originally posted by no1smootha
...voting on motions that affect the government of the Lodges, and electing Grand Master, Senior Grand Warden, and Junior Grand Warden to lead the GL for the term.


We also have a position called 'Deputy Grand Master' which is above the Senior Grand Warden.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by no1smootha
 


Thank you for responding and clearing it up for me...a little bit anyway.


Sounds like he is/ was a very respected member of his lodge.

Thanks again for your input.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


He was elected by his peers to the grand lodge level, then he spent the time and effort to go through all the chairs of the grand lodge and became Grand Master of his state. It' a huge honor and a very big deal. He had not only the respect of the masons in his lodge, but the respect of the masons in his state as well. It's the highest elected position in masonry.


So, that means he was the grand master of the entire state? If that's the case, I'm going to feel a bit intimidated by him from now on... not that I wasn't already!

Thanks!



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 08:28 AM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


not at all. In my experience, these men are the most genuine, nice people you would ever meet. I would be proud to have a conversation with him. Don't feel intimidated at all. He would be a great resource for any questions you may have about masonry. Please let us know what your take on him is if you do speak with him.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 09:15 AM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


not at all. In my experience, these men are the most genuine, nice people you would ever meet. I would be proud to have a conversation with him. Don't feel intimidated at all. He would be a great resource for any questions you may have about masonry. Please let us know what your take on him is if you do speak with him.


I will be seeing him in a few weeks...but, not sure I will have the opportunity to speak about anything relating to the Masons.

We gather at his house every year to celebrate a town festival and his home just happens to be along the parade route. There are usually a ton of people at his house...friends, family and his colleagues. So, I'm not sure that would be the right time to bring it up but, you know what....I'll play it by ear.

He is a nice guy, don't get me wrong...he's just the silent and observant type and it's hard to get a feel of what his mood or thoughts are at any given time. I guess that's why I find him to be a little intimidating.

Another question for you if you don't mind...hopefully this doesn't sound silly.

I know that women are not allowed to become members of the Masons so, would the fact that I happen to be a female prohibit him from talking about anything Mason related?

Thanks a bunch network dude...I appreciate all your help.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


Being a woman should not prohibit any conversation . I talk to my wife all the time about Freemasonry , if she has questions I answer them as there is very little we may not talk about it . As Master of my lodge , I even bounce ideas off of her , she has been a great help .



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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Originally posted by whenandwhere
reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


Being a woman should not prohibit any conversation . I talk to my wife all the time about Freemasonry , if she has questions I answer them as there is very little we may not talk about it . As Master of my lodge , I even bounce ideas off of her , she has been a great help .

Thanks whenandwhere! Good to know.

After reading the replies, I'm beginning to feel a bigger sense of pride in being related to this guy and sharing his last name. I've always known that he was highly respected in the community as a prominent business man and somewhat of a philanthropist but, this sort of takes it to a new level.

Another question if I may?

Are there certain lodges that hold more power or influence than others? Is it based on membership (meaning how many members per lodge) or, can the location of the lodge determine how much power or influence it has. For example, would a lodge in DC hold more power than one in NYC?

Thanks again for your help.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


I think he would be happily surprised that you are interested enough to ask him questions about masonry.

I am in a very rural area and have not traveled too far out of my comfort zone, so I don't have any knowledge of what lodges have more "famous" members, but the cool thing is, we all meet on the level, meaning that nobody is any more important than the other in lodge. So the garbage man is just as important as the bank president and gets treated with the same respect. I like that aspect of it.

Have a great day!



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by MagesticEsoteric
Are there certain lodges that hold more power or influence than others? Is it based on membership (meaning how many members per lodge) or, can the location of the lodge determine how much power or influence it has. For example, would a lodge in DC hold more power than one in NYC?

Thanks again for your help.


Not in so many words. The only reason a lodge might have any more sway than any other would have to do with the degree of activity of its members and past Masters, the latter getting involved in Grand Lodge committees, becoming Grand Lodge officers, etc. while the Lodge membership might be involved as a group in various activities benefiting society at large in their area, charities, etc.

Beyond that, a lodge's influence may also be reflected in the esteem it is held in by other lodge's by way of age (the oldest here in Ontario was founded in 1795), quality of their Ritual work, etc.

HTH
Fitz

eta: Just an addendum to my first paragraph that these wouldn't really translate as "influence" but rather more as greater recognition by dint of the involvement of PMs and the lodge as a whole.
edit on 25-4-2012 by Fitzgibbon because: Just an additional thought



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by Fitzgibbon
 

Out of curiosity, I looked up the local lodge that my relative is a member of...it was founded in 1768. Would this be considered an older lodge relative to others in the U.S.?



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Right, I forgot the DGM...thanks Augustus! The Deputy Grand Master is elected to serve the term following as I recall.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by MagesticEsoteric
reply to post by Fitzgibbon
 

Out of curiosity, I looked up the local lodge that my relative is a member of...it was founded in 1768. Would this be considered an older lodge relative to others in the U.S.?


It'd be a bit speculative on my part but I would expect so insomuch as modern day Masonry got its start in England in 1717 with the United Grand Lodge of England. The other thing to consider is that there may previously have been more lodges that were founded earlier than that but which have since closed their doors (in Masonic terms, having gone dark). Masonry has gone through a couple or three retrenchments (after the Morgan affair and with the Baby Boomers from about 1980 or so up until the last decade) and a number of lodges either amalgamated or closed entirely. For a lodge of that age to still be at work is a testament to its membership and its having stayed relevant in its community.

HTH
Fitz



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


It sounds like he is similar to the Grand Masters I've met. I had dinner with a couple of them at a Masonic event. I sat at the table with them purely by accident but any apprehension I had soon faded when I realized they were pretty much just like you said. They were quiet, very friendly and pleasant.

I think it's refreshing that a woman would ask about masonry myself. We do have groups like Eastern Star for women who are relatives of masons that have similar ideals.

I think my wife is mostly bored with any details I share. I think you would find that most masons would be very happy to tell you about the lodge and the craft. The perception that we are guarded is usually due to our tradition of not proselytizing or recruiting.

For centuries we've gone about our work and warmly welcomed any man of good reputation who believes in God to join us. But we hold it sacred that a man should only come of his own free will and accord.

Because your grandfather is both technically, and spiritually, my brother I can tell you certain things about him even though I've never met him.

The fact that he is a Mason tells me that that he lives according to principles of brotherly love, relief, Truth and that Faith, Hope and Charity are major influences in his life.

The fact that he is a Past Master of a Lodge that is over 200 years old tells me that his brothers hold him in incredibly high regard.

The fact that he was a Grand Master tells me that the masonic lodges in your state consider him a role model and a great leader.

He sounds like he's lead an amazing life. Even if he plays his hand close to the vest and downplays his accomplishments I can assure you that he represents the finest Freemasonry has to offer.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


I am also struck by your description of 'silent and introspective'. This characteristic is one that has been taught and emphasized in almost all spiritual traditions.

It may just be his personality but in general people who go about their lives with this personality have mastered what many others strive a lifetime for.

One verse that pops into my mind when I get all anxious and frazzled about life is, "Be still and know that I AM"

I hope these observations are relevant to him. I hate generalizations and stereotypes, and I hope you don't feel that I am generalizing him, (and I know he is family) but it's quite remarkable for someone who isn't a Freemason to observe qualities that all masons strive for.

As far as power or influence I think this is a misconception that non-masons have about us. Even when George Washington was President the Master of his lodge was a servant at his house. Brother Washington would have sat attentively in the meetings and followed the directions of his servant during that meeting. The Master has discretion over all lodge matters, but he only sits in the chair for a year and he is democratically elected.

The Grand Lodge of each state is the sole authority over all lodges in the state. That is where masonic authority ends (at least in the US). A Grand Lodge in another state cannot govern a lodge that is in a different state. In the US we recognize no authority above the Grand Lodge as far as Freemasonry lodge business.

Many men are attracted to Freemasonry because of a perception that it confers power. The opposite, though, is true. No matter what lodge or country a true Freemason is from there are certain common threads that bind us together.

Without getting into specifics, when we first become an Entered Apprentice we must divest ourselves of all metals and anything of monetary value before entering the lodge. This teaches that temporal wealth has no value in the Lodge.

We are taught not only the importance of Charity, but also that true charity occurs when it is selfless, anonymous and given without condition.

well.. as the ATS folks know I could go on forever but for myself I think you are very fortunate to know your grandfather.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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oops.. I just realized you said 'relative' and I read 'grandfather'

Sorry about the confusion!



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by emsed1
oops.. I just realized you said 'relative' and I read 'grandfather'

Sorry about the confusion!


No worries...I had a bit of a chuckle because I don't think my grandfather would have qualified as a citizen in good standing so, likely wouldn't have been a good candidate for the mason brotherhood.

He was, to put it mildly, an absolute hell raiser.


The relative I speak of is much as you describe....he is well accomplished but, never flaunts or brags about his possessions, wealth or status in the community. As long as I have known him, I have never seen him stressed or flustered so, it falls in line with the quote "Be still and know that I AM".

It's interesting that you mention George Washington because, while reading about the local lodge, his name was mentioned. Not as a member, from what I was able to discern, although it appears that he was in the area as a surveyor for many years and served the community in various other ways.

I have to admit, I'm still a bit baffled to discover that this man was the Grand Master of our entire state. Not in a bad way at all....actually in a good way because, he's so humble that you would never believe he was held in such high regard amongst his peers. Perhaps that is reason????

Thank you so much for your replies!



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by MagesticEsoteric
 


Freemasonry is a Direct Democracy. All lodges vote for the officers of the Grand Lodge, the Grand Master is directly elected in the same fashion to serve a term of 1 year.

He's like the President and the Supreme Court rolled into one. But not Legislator, being a Direct Democracy all new "bills" if you will, are directly voted on by the Lodges in Open Communication.

If your lodge does something that violates some obscure Masonic code.. you can bet the Grand Master will send you a letter chastising your infractions.


Then there's the .. sigh ... Summons. We keep tally on how many times the lodge can get Summoned during each persons reign as WM.


But for the most part there is a lot of visiting of lodges and charities.. each GM picks a specific charity they want to champion during their tenure, and the GM and his Wife will host numerous events for the charity, and lodges unite to support it as well. So you got a lot of traveling to do, visitations, tedious judicial paperwork and charity to run.



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