It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Iowa Animal Abuse Video Law Makes It A Crime To Record Cruelty

page: 1
6
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 12:49 PM
link   
Last night Iowa's governor signed in the first law in the United States that makes recording inside of [factory] farms illegal. One must have permission of the farmer to record or photograph on their property, convenient right? While trespassing on private property is wrong in itself, why do we need extra laws on it, for only one industry, targeting only one group of people with a common interest? This was opposed by numerous organizations from the Humane Society of the United States to the American Civil Liberties Union. Sadly, Gov. Branstad didn't listen to a single voice.


DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa became the first state Friday to make it a crime to surreptitiously get into a farming operation to record video of animal abuse.


Republican Gov. Terry Branstad signed the law despite protests, letters and campaigns launched on Twitter and Facebook by animal welfare groups that have used secretly taped videos to sway public opinion against what they consider cruel practices.


But Branstad's action wasn't a surprise. Iowa is the nation's leading pork and egg producer, and the governor has strong ties to the state's agricultural industry. He signed the measure in a private ceremony and issued no statement about his decision.


HP Green: Iowa Animal Abuse Video Law Makes It A Crime To Record Cruelty

The first time is punishable as a misdemeanor, one year in jail, and a $1500 fine. The second time around one could face a felony. It's disgraceful that seven more states in addition to Iowa want to do the same thing and legally declare America a safe haven for corporate deception and animal abusers. It's unconstitutional, this is against our First Amendment rights, free speech, free press, the environment and food safety, in addition to the obvious animal rights issue.

The Agricultural industry rather throw all whistleblowers in jail than clean up their own act. Thanks Branstad for portraying America in such a negative light to the rest of the world, and for putting other states at risk of these ridiculous bills becoming law.

Legislatures in seven other states — Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York and Utah— have considered laws that would enhance penalties against those who secretly record video of livestock

Utah and Illinois are in immediate danger of passing similar laws.

Craig Hill, president of the Iowa Farm Bureau Federation, has said he hopes Iowa's action can lead the way for other states to pass similar legislation.


edit on 3/3/2012 by SpaceJ because: fix vid




posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 12:59 PM
link   
how do they expect us to bring proof of animal abuse then? do they want us to bring the corpses into the courtroom?



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:02 PM
link   
reply to post by SpaceJ
 


Recall the governor.
We did it here in Kalifornia, why not in one of the good states?



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:06 PM
link   
reply to post by g146541
 


this law just protects the abusers. as is often the case with new laws.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:17 PM
link   
reply to post by g146541
 

I sincerely hope they do. I'm very sad for Iowa today. Here in Illinois the first punishment will start off as a felony, even more harsh than Iowa's. The bill by Rep. Jim Sacia is in the House now and will be reviewed in Springfield this coming week. Protest plans are most definitely already in action by Chicago's local Mercy for Animals. Chicagoans with MFA even went and protested in Des Moines, Iowa at the capitol building two days ago. He doesn't want to listen no matter how many speak up. Terry Branstad just slapped tons of advocacy groups in the face. He is more stupid than he appears if he doesn't expect backlash for this. It's sickening how easily and blatantly they just put corporations before our own rights. And way to put a huge stamp on Iowa that says "We have far too much to hide."

Will it stop anyone? Probably not. He's fueled the fire. Challenge accepted.

Oh, and ironically here is Iowa's state motto: "Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain."


And an important thing to note, Iowa has the most mass production factory farms of any state in the country. Nice example to set.
edit on 3/3/2012 by SpaceJ because: add



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:28 PM
link   
These bought-and-paid-for psychopath dirty politicians think they are going to keep their jobs after this? Then they are delusional bought-and-paid-for psychopath dirty politicians



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:30 PM
link   
And I just love how he didn't say a word. Not a single word in defense of his actions to the people who elected him into office. He signed it at a private ceremony and issued no statement.

Too much of a coward to even defend his own actions. And as someone said to me, this should say he signed it in a 'private funeral' for all those who are to suffer.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:33 PM
link   
reply to post by LonelyGuy
 


Give you a hint, you dont need to find proof of animal cruelty on a farm. Just go to your local super market and pick up a nice T Bone steak. Yumm



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 01:54 PM
link   
Related articles & press releases:

Blindfolded MFA Advocates Protest Iowa's "Ag-Gag" Bill, Call for Veto

Iowa Ag Gag bill threatens the safety of American food

IA Gov Signs Ag-gag Bill | Animal Law Coalition

Press Release: Humane Society

'Ag gag' bill may gag free speech, say legal scholars

Unbelievable that this passed with so much opposition behind it! And at the expense of his position as governor? Perhaps it is because he plans to retire soon, BACK to his family's farming business??? Securing his own future prosperity at the expense of the people he 'serves'.


NEW YORK—Twenty-seven national groups representing a wide spectrum of public interests have signed on to a statement opposing proposed “ag-gag” legislation that is being considered in states around the country. These bills seek to criminalize investigations that reveal animal abuse and could suppress critical information about the production of animal products on agricultural facilities.



In addition to the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®), these organizations include Compassion Over Killing, Farm Forward, Farm Sanctuary, The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), In Defense of Animals and Mercy For Animals (MFA).



In addition to the aforementioned animal organizations, the following groups representing civil liberties, public health, food safety, environmental, food justice, legal, workers’ rights and First Amendment interests signed on to the statement: A Well-Fed World; Brighter Green; Center for Constitutional Rights; Center for Science in the Public Interest; The Cornucopia Institute; Earth Policy Institute; Earth Save; Food and Water Watch; Food Empowerment Project; Government Accountability Project; National Freedom of Information Coalition; National Press Photographers Association; Natural Resources Defense Council; Organic Consumers Association; Slow Food USA; T. Colin Campbell Foundation; United Food and Commercial Workers International Union; Whistleblower Support Fund; and Youth for Environmental Sanity.



The statement reads in part: “These bills represent a wholesale assault on many fundamental values shared by all people across the United States. Not only would these bills perpetuate animal abuse on industrial farms, they would also threaten workers’ rights, consumer health and safety, and the freedom of journalists, employees and the public at large to share information about something as fundamental as our food supply. We call on state legislators around the nation to drop or vote against these dangerous and un-American efforts.”


Press Release: ASPCA+

All of that. All of these people and he doesn't even attempt to address anyone or anything.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 02:17 PM
link   
Thanks for sharing. What a sad day. Iowa Governor is bad news, going against even the AVMA on this.


Video last year about their stance:

AVMA plea for humane treatment of animals





"It's our moral an ethical responsibility*...work together to stop the horrific abuse of animals."
- video above
Veterinarians, Assistants, Technicians, caretakers, farmers, and the like, etc.




edit on 3-3-2012 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 05:45 PM
link   
reply to post by dreamingawake
 


Thanks for sharing that video. The fact that groups like the AVMA and ALCU oppose this shows just how far this issue reaches, and just how much Iowa's politicians don't care.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 05:46 PM
link   
The other seven states, the top 3 are closest to passing the bills:

Illinois: HB 5143 - Take Action
New York: S 5172 - Take Action
Utah: HB 187 - Take Action
Indiana: SB 184 (bill pending)
Minnesota: HF 1369/ SF 1118 (bill pending)
Missouri: SB 695 (bill pending)
Nebraska: LB 915 (bill pending)

Here is the Change.org petition for Illinois: Petition



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 05:52 PM
link   
Believe it or not people have never had the legal right to just go photographing or videotaping on private property.

communications-media.lawyers.com...

This is perceived to be a lax law probably due to the proliferation of cameras and also mass media wanting to get stories.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 06:12 PM
link   
reply to post by Malcher
 



Exceptions to ordinary trespass laws: Taking photographs to document a crime


So this essentially goes against trespassing laws that are already in place. The new law makes it a crime to document a crime, where these trespassing laws say you get an exception for reporting crime. Farms have existed so long with just these trespassing laws, why in the world would they just now need extra protection. I can't believe they allowed this to happen just on the fact that it seems entirely insensible from a legal standpoint, let alone all the rights issues.

This also makes it illegal to even get a job at a farm without revealing you're affiliated with an animal rights group. They may put a spot on applications where you would be asked what, if any, groups you belong to. If you omit this information and are caught, you'll be charged. And it leaves a lot of room for workers who aren't with a group to be charged with crimes.

Even if you aren't there for the purpose of documenting abuse, if you just simply work there and then see abuse or unsanitary conditions, you are not allowed to capture it on video/camera. And you aren't allowed to report it to any sort of authority. Your bound by law to follow the 'chain of command' at the farm. Which means, what the person reports will never even get out, and probably won't get past the first person they relay it to.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 07:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by SpaceJ
reply to post by Malcher
 



Exceptions to ordinary trespass laws: Taking photographs to document a crime


So this essentially goes against trespassing laws that are already in place. The new law makes it a crime to document a crime, where these trespassing laws say you get an exception for reporting crime. Farms have existed so long with just these trespassing laws, why in the world would they just now need extra protection. I can't believe they allowed this to happen just on the fact that it seems entirely insensible from a legal standpoint, let alone all the rights issues.

This also makes it illegal to even get a job at a farm without revealing you're affiliated with an animal rights group. They may put a spot on applications where you would be asked what, if any, groups you belong to. If you omit this information and are caught, you'll be charged. And it leaves a lot of room for workers who aren't with a group to be charged with crimes.

Even if you aren't there for the purpose of documenting abuse, if you just simply work there and then see abuse or unsanitary conditions, you are not allowed to capture it on video/camera. And you aren't allowed to report it to any sort of authority. Your bound by law to follow the 'chain of command' at the farm. Which means, what the person reports will never even get out, and probably won't get past the first person they relay it to.


Animal rights groups would not consider any killing of animals as humane. Regardless of how you feel i am fairly certain it is impossible for the entire human race to become vegetarian for the simple fact that all these people could not be fed with vegetables alone. I just dont think it is practical.

en.wikipedia.org...

In that case ANY slaughterhouse would be viewed as unsanitary or cruel etc. so they make feeding people impossible. I am not defending one side or the other.

These laws protect everyone though. IF i work in an office i dont want someone snapping pictures of me without my consent or knowledge. If these groups have their way we all lose rights.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 08:10 PM
link   
reply to post by Malcher
 


It's not about being a vegetarian though. I understand you aren't for one side or the other. But I'm saying the reason that so many various interest groups are opposing this is that it poses food safety and sanitary concerns, you know? And it's restricting free speech and freedom of press. And the rights of employees.

And as a member of many of the mentioned organizations I can tell you that not all activists think 'all' killing of animals should be a crime (on farms). Certainly it isn't looked at as a good thing either, of course. More like something we know would be a waste of time trying to fight, so instead we focus on how they are treated at these places. Myself, and whoever else fits into my boat, are simply pushing for government regulations of these farms.

There's a big difference in the 'necessity' of killing something instantly, and stringing it slowly out over torturous hours, days, weeks, if not months.

So let's call it *Excessive cruelty* for this purpose? Question, whether you are a vegetarian or not, don't you still agree there's no reason to prolong their deaths and pain? It seems too many workers find fun in doing these things.

When it comes to being sanitary, a good example is free range farms where animals can roam as they would if they weren't on farms. Factory farms cram as many animals in one space as possible until they literally cannot move. They break body parts and trample each other until it's just a big bloody, infected mess.


edit on 3/3/2012 by SpaceJ because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/3/2012 by SpaceJ because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2012 @ 06:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by SpaceJ
reply to post by Malcher
 


It's not about being a vegetarian though. I understand you aren't for one side or the other. But I'm saying the reason that so many various interest groups are opposing this is that it poses food safety and sanitary concerns, you know? And it's restricting free speech and freedom of press. And the rights of employees.

And as a member of many of the mentioned organizations I can tell you that not all activists think 'all' killing of animals should be a crime (on farms). Certainly it isn't looked at as a good thing either, of course. More like something we know would be a waste of time trying to fight, so instead we focus on how they are treated at these places. Myself, and whoever else fits into my boat, are simply pushing for government regulations of these farms.

There's a big difference in the 'necessity' of killing something instantly, and stringing it slowly out over torturous hours, days, weeks, if not months.

So let's call it *Excessive cruelty* for this purpose? Question, whether you are a vegetarian or not, don't you still agree there's no reason to prolong their deaths and pain? It seems too many workers find fun in doing these things.

When it comes to being sanitary, a good example is free range farms where animals can roam as they would if they weren't on farms. Factory farms cram as many animals in one space as possible until they literally cannot move. They break body parts and trample each other until it's just a big bloody, infected mess.


edit on 3/3/2012 by SpaceJ because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/3/2012 by SpaceJ because: (no reason given)


With so many humans we are not going to get rid of these large operations. It is just that simple. Not being able to eat right effects low income people more than people who are able to be more discriminate due to having the funds to make the purchases for all vegetarian food or even just non mass produced food.

If someone has evidence then they go through the proper channels and things are investigated but to just give people free reign to run around with recording devices recording in secret is mind bogling. This can potentially effect everyones expectations of privacy.
edit on 4-3-2012 by Malcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 07:51 AM
link   
How do you fight fascism in America, is very simple, when you see what food manufacturing and processing states are doing just boycott their goods

Unless is a law next to take away from packaging where the processing comes from, Any American that is concern with what they put and feed their bodies with, should take their time to read from where the crap they are about to eat comes from

I can say right now that personally I will boycott any food coming from any state that will fall for laws like this.

To tell the truth I make sure that most of my food are not GMOs or process, so my health is becoming more and more better as my choices of manufacturing crap is disappearing from my diet.

Boycott Iowa food sources plain and simple you be surprise how better you will feel and look after a while


After all is your money what support this crappy and dirty food manufactures.



posted on Apr, 18 2012 @ 10:46 AM
link   
Please look up Guy Taylor on facebook, he lives in England and when i reported him to facebook for these cruel images they said i have to personally complain to him, thus putting myself at risk. I have had the police and Rspca in my house when i reported him and they said they want more evidence. Why is the law so slow, i don't know what to do next.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 01:18 AM
link   
Protecting Big Industry as usual. Tyson, Smithfield, etc., they don't want you to see the workings of their business. If more people knew where their food came from, they would start to pay attention. We need to return to natures ways. Cattle in crowded, filthy feed lots, being administered antibiotics, that's not natural. And similar is happening in the vegetable sector. Unnatural foods grown in substandard soil, chemically sprayed. How can humans not be sick, eating all this stuff?



new topics

top topics



 
6
<<   2 >>

log in

join