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Anyone have experience with anti gravity devices?

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posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 06:48 PM
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I purchased one of these at a ham/electronic flea market today, specifically the model GRA80. For $15 I could not pass it up. The seller said it had belonged to his son and there was no literature or information with the device.

What I believe to be the output section is a clear plastic cylinder filled with an assembly of components and transformer oil. It appears to be a "ladder" made of disc capacitors and T-75 diodes. On top of that is a short section of white PVC pipe, 1" diameter, very homebrew-looking, with the threaded end of a screw sticking out of the top. Hard to describe, but I do not want to post photos, I like to remain anonymous and don't think that is easily possible with an online photo storage service.

Before I go attaching it to a power supply and potentially causing a disaster, does anyone know of any resource for information on these kinds of experimental devices? Any online forums, Yahoo Groups, etc?




posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by therainmaker
 


hi op
yeh they are fine
this product has been selling for a few years now
i think they use the bifield braun effect
(sorry spelling bad)



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by therainmaker
Before I go attaching it to a power supply and potentially causing a disaster, does anyone know of any resource for information on these kinds of experimental devices? Any online forums, Yahoo Groups, etc?



Do a google search for the Biefeld-Brown effect.
Basically, the high voltage charges up air molecules and throws them downwards, causing an upward lift.
Weirdos like to imagine that this is somehow related to UFOs and "anti-gravity technology".

Edit - yeah, davesmart beat me to it while I was watching youtube videos of these things.

edit on 4-2-2012 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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You'll be playing with 20,000 volts at least, so if you don't know what you're doing.....

read!!!!!




posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by mainidh
You'll be playing with 20,000 volts at least, so if you don't know what you're doing.....

read!!!!!



Amps play an important part in that, but volts is something everybody understands somewhat
edit on 4-2-2012 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by therainmaker
 



I purchased one of these at a ham/electronic flea market today, specifically the model GRA80. For $15 I could not pass it up. The seller said it had belonged to his son and there was no literature or information with the device.


First... it's not anti-gravity. It's used to produce ionizing voltage. It requires air (or some form of gas medium) to produce thrust (presuming that is how you have it rigged).


What I believe to be the output section is a clear plastic cylinder filled with an assembly of components and transformer oil. It appears to be a "ladder" made of disc capacitors and T-75 diodes.


That's a Cockroft-Walton 'generator' - en.wikipedia.org...

It's your voltage multiplier circuit which utilizes pulsed DC inputs to charge and discharge capacitors in such a fashion as to multiply the voltage at each stage. That is what is producing you ionizing voltages (kilovolts of electricity).

The transformer oil is used to help prevent corona losses as well as open-air discharges across the voltage multiplier.


On top of that is a short section of white PVC pipe, 1" diameter, very homebrew-looking, with the threaded end of a screw sticking out of the top.


The threaded end of the screw is likely your cathode. Electrons will more easily pass into the air along the sharp edges of the screw's threading - improving its ionizing performance. The PVC serves as an insulator and duct for the ionized gasses. Or - that's my analysis of it.


Hard to describe, but I do not want to post photos, I like to remain anonymous and don't think that is easily possible with an online photo storage service.


To sound deliberately creepy - if I felt motivated to do so, I could use 'open' resources to get a pretty good fix on your ID and a thousand bucks or so to contract a PI to give me the name of your first pet.

If "they" want to find you - "they" can. And "they" can be anyone with a grudge and a valid credit card.


Before I go attaching it to a power supply and potentially causing a disaster, does anyone know of any resource for information on these kinds of experimental devices? Any online forums, Yahoo Groups, etc?


If it is what you link to, then it looks fairly well contained. Basically, don't touch the cathode (screw) while it's on (and for several minutes after it's powered down - just to be sure those capacitors aren't holding any nasty surprises or static buildup isn't going to do the same), and you should be good.

The only other thing to watch out for is static buildup on nearby surfaces. I wouldn't use this thing near a computer. It would also be a fairly good idea to do this well away from your home's ground sources (basically - go outside and into a work shed, or something a little disjointed from your home), as there is the potential for the high voltages to build up and cause some nasty problems with grounding.

Probably not with a device as low powered as those... but it's better to play it safe than to end up spiking your entire home grid.



posted on Feb, 5 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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Originally posted by therainmaker
Hard to describe, but I do not want to post photos, I like to remain anonymous and don't think that is easily possible with an online photo storage service.
You can strip the exif data and post to your ATS account (Actually ATS may strip it for you but I'm not sure).

But obviously if your car license plate is visible in the background, even that won't make you anonymous.

Aim is right, it's not antigravity...no antigravity device has ever been demonstrated publicly and confirmed. All flying devices create some kind of slightly larger than equal and opposite force to counteract gravity, whether the device moves air (like a helicopter), or ions, or just uses magnetic repulsion.

He's also right about keeping it away from computers, and probably electronics in general if it creates high voltages; High voltages can fry some electronics. When you shuffle your feet on the carpet and touch a doorknob, the spark only stings you a little...but that's thousands of volts, enough to fry computer chips.



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