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FDA New Tobacco Sales Compliance Checks

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posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:08 PM
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I work in a convenience store and thought I would share this latest from the FDA:

On June 22, 2010, the FDA published a rule that restricts the sale, distribution, and marketing of tobacco to children. This is nothing new. The FDA has been trying to limit the ability of minors to obtain tobacco for some time. At the present, clerks at the store I work for use their own discretion to decide who needs to be "carded". Most of us card anyone who appears young unless we know them to be of age from prior carding. We generally do not card older folks at all. We know our regular customers, and provide them with the convenience of not having to rift through their wallet or purse for information we already are aware of. Starting February 1, this will come to an end for a large number of our customers.

Taken directly from the handout I received after my arse chewing(I'm known for being no nonsense about this kind of crap)
New FDA requirements to be implemented Feb. 1, 2012:
Requires retailer to check photo ID with birth date of anyone under age 27 who attempts to purchase tobacco, regardless of whom the individual is or what their relationship is to the clerk, the clerk must ask for and verify the person's age EVERY time they attempt to purchase tobacco products, no exceptions. Anyone who appears to be under the age of 27 MUST present their ID.

Now, I know there will be those who see this as no big deal and oh yes, "Think of the children", but really, this carries very serious consequences to the stores and the clerks. They intend to send out "shoppers" to test for compliance. Clerks can be fined and terminated. While we, the clerks, will try to comply fully, I can tell you from my own years of experience in this business that this will do no more to stop youth smoking than any other measure the government has tried over the years.

There are a number of other requirements in this little gem as well, mostly concerning the tobacco companies themselves.

They can no longer offer free items such as hats, t-shirts, etc. with or without purchase. They can't sponsor athletic, musical, or other events. No free samples. Audio ads may not contain music or sound effects.

I had to wonder why the tobacco companies would stand for this, but my research has shown that Altria, formerly Philip Morris, is for the measures. It would seem that being the wealthiest tobacco company, they are trying for a "more responsible image". For this reason, they changed their name from Phillip Morris to Altria. Besides a look at their campaign contributions, as shown on their website, shows whose back pocket they are in anyway. Altria also owns Bird's Eye, Kraft Foods, and Miller Brewing. There is an excellent article here about them: www.sourcewatch.org..." target="_blank" class="postlink">www.sourcewatch.org...

For the most part, I am ready to look for work in another type of business. I'm about sick of all the government involvement. The clerks I work with and myself have grown weary of the never ending demands of the government for us to be policing the citizens. The personal costs of making a mistake and the legal repercussions are growing far to high for a minimum wage job. While I don't mind using common sense to keep kids from buying tobacco or liquor, I don't think it should be on my shoulders to ID a man or woman who can legally fight and die in war from making a purchase of tobacco, especially if I already know he/she is legal. This is ludicrous, but until the American people are ready to do more than lie down for it, I suppose it's the future we deserve.




posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:13 PM
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I had one idiot take my license
and swipe it through there system
in the process splitting my license
in half. I should of gotten a manager
and make them pay for a replacement
but I just let it go. I was annoyed to no
end. Anyways it will just be a hassle
will not stop a damn thing. You can
always find a bum by at the gas station
that if you throw him a extra buck or two
will get you whatever your heart desired..



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by Komaratzi11
 


Free markets are a joke.

Freedom no longer exists.

Conditional freedom with a side of fries or milkshake!!

Soon you can add big macs and soda to the prohibited list.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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Personally, I think there should just be policies in these stores that you have to card everybody. And when people complain, just tell them that the government is getting so ridiculous with the standards that they've had to adopt that policy to curtail legal ramifications for both the store and their employees.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:23 PM
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I always laugh to myself when I get carded for cigarettes but then hand the clerk a credit card and they never check for the signature on the back to see if it matches my DL.

It wont be long until people on prescription drugs have to register with a federal board and disclose every single person who may step foot into their house because of the fear of kids stealing them.

I feel for you. I have seen clerks ID men that are clearly 30 years their senior (at a Stewert's) and get reamed out and made to feel completely insignificant.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by AnIntellectualRedneck
 


Some of my co-workers and I have talked about carding everyone, regardless of age. I'm sure we'd get in trouble eventually, but it might get the point across.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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If you want over the top tobacco control, come to Australia.

For a number of years now they have been checking the ID of anyone that may look under 25. This is for both alcohol and tobacco which both have an age restriction of 18.

There is no advertising allowed at all. No TV, radio, billboards, newspaper, sponsorships of anything.

All tobacco products have to be out of sight in stores.

We pay around $25 for a pack of 40s with something like 75% of that being government tax.

No smoking in bars, pubs, clubs, restuarants, public transport, some beaches, parks, playgrounds.

Have to be something like 5 meters from building entrances.

The latest move by lobby groups and government is plain packaging that they are hoping to come in this year sometime. Tobacco companies are taking the government to court regarding this.

All the while deeming electronic cigarettes and all forms of smokeless tobacco either illegal or taxed so heavily it's not worth it.

Hmmmm is the health of the people most important or the $5B profit the Australian government reaps?



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by olliemc84
 


I've been one of those reamed out clerks! Customers can get pretty upset and I expect this will bring out the worst in some of them. Not to mention the long lines at the register while we scan countless numbers of IDs all day.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by aaron2209
If you want over the top tobacco control, come to Australia.

For a number of years now they have been checking the ID of anyone that may look under 25. This is for both alcohol and tobacco which both have an age restriction of 18.

There is no advertising allowed at all. No TV, radio, billboards, newspaper, sponsorships of anything.

All tobacco products have to be out of sight in stores.

We pay around $25 for a pack of 40s with something like 75% of that being government tax.

No smoking in bars, pubs, clubs, restuarants, public transport, some beaches, parks, playgrounds.

Have to be something like 5 meters from building entrances.

The latest move by lobby groups and government is plain packaging that they are hoping to come in this year sometime. Tobacco companies are taking the government to court regarding this.

All the while deeming electronic cigarettes and all forms of smokeless tobacco either illegal or taxed so heavily it's not worth it.

Hmmmm is the health of the people most important or the $5B profit the Australian government reaps?


Australia sounds a lot like New York. Drinking age is 21 though.
2nd



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by aaron2209
 


I wonder if the US government is taking a play out of Australia's book. I could see the insanity going on and on and the only winner being the government. Typical!

Sorry for your suffering over there.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:37 PM
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I guess the tobacco corporations stopped bribing the politicians worldwide.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by aaron2209
 


Uhmmm of course the health of a person is more important than any amount of money. Psychopathic question...

Not that I support laws that tell people what they can or can't do. But the question you asked was ridiculous..
edit on 1/30/2012 by mnmcandiez because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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Great post OP.

While this wasn't law in my state, there has been a PR/awareness campaign for the last 10 years or so that recommended requiring ID from anyone who looked 27 or under. There are stickers and signs up in every gas station and have been for years. It wasn't too long before it was pretty much policy statewide, at the private level. I live in a pretty conservative state where you can't buy alcohol outside of a state run liquor store and the legal smoking age is 19.

Police often run stings at gas stations here, I've even seen a job advertisement (many years ago) looking for an 18 year old person who would try to buy cigarettes without ID - if he was successful they would charge the clerk who would almost certainly be fired as the company is just as liable as the person who made the sale. I didn't apply.

I can understand a desire to get merchants to be aware of who they are selling cigarettes and alcohol to - but the problem here is that not only will this law exist, it will actively be enforced. That means tax dollars are going to equipment, training, man hours, operations, vehicle expenses, weapons, court time, etc.. All for something that should be pretty much common sense.

The idea that you would have to check someone's ID every time, even if you'd sold to them hundreds of times before is ludicrous. Things are getting sillier and sillier each day.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:46 PM
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I was also a clerk for a couple years, and I got busted selling cigarettes to a minor. They used a pretty girl to slip by me during busy times of the day. Back then (1993-1994) there were no active surveillance cameras and the corporate lawyers knew there were reasonable doubt excuses for a defense. We use to get 1 freebie before getting hit with a $500 fine (employee not employer).

Think about what the gov't ALLOWS to this day in foods and beverages. Really think about it....

Sodium Fluoride
Aspartame (it's even in baby formula)
High Fructose Corn Syrup
Food colorings
Phosphoric acid
Bleached flour
Mercury in tooth fillings
Every psychological medication kids are on
Liquor stores on every corner (I was able to get it from age 12 on)
Absolute factual connections between vaccines & X, Y, Z disorders

the list goes on & on, you get the point. WHY are they sooo worried about frikken tobacco? Seriously? I'll die from a million things way before tobacco gets to me. I'm a 23 year smoker and I never get sick, my lungs are fine, and I am "choosing" to smoke, taking the risk and full responsibility for the side effects.

Why do we need such relentless micro managing of our every want & desire?
Every clerk across the country should violate this new rule from day 1. That will send a clear message.
edit on 30-1-2012 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by aaron2209
 


Ouch!

It's getting like that in alot of US states too - at least the no smoking at all in public buildings. Where I live they used to be able to get around it by calling it a private club and making people get a membership, but you can't even do that anymore.

You can't get a beer at the strip club here either! (not that I frequent strip clubs)

It's really funny when you think about it, the FDA passes drugs that were 'fast tracked' and never properly tested, people end up with rare, permanent, debilitating conditions, and this continues unimpeded. This is just one example - there are so many more - meanwhile it takes a full cavity search to buy a pack of smokes.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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Well I see it as an opportunity to explain to each and every person how big the government impacts their daily lives. Tell them to look at congress' approval rating. Do something about it or shut up and show me your ID.

Planting seeds.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by mnmcandiez
 


The question was posed after stating that alternate forms of tobacco are made illegal, or taxed to death. Things like smokeless tobacco have almost no harmful effects. That leads to the question, why are they taxing this? If its not for the heath of people, then it must be the money.

It is not the question that is psychopathic, its the government that imposes the laws, restrictions, and taxes.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by xDeadcowx
 


Smokeless tobacco is not safe.


Cancer. Your risk of certain types of cancer increases if you use chewing tobacco or other types of smokeless tobacco. This includes esophageal cancer and various types of oral cancer, including cancers of your mouth, throat, cheek, gums, lips and tongue. You also face increased risks related to pancreatic cancer and kidney cancer.


Cavities. Chewing tobacco and other forms of smokeless tobacco cause tooth decay. That's because chewing tobacco contains high amounts of sugar, which contributes to cavities. Chewing tobacco also contains coarse particles that can irritate your gums and scratch away at the enamel on your teeth, making your teeth more vulnerable to cavities.

Gum disease. The sugar and irritants in chewing tobacco and other forms of smokeless tobacco can cause your gums to pull away from your teeth in the area of your mouth where you place the chew. Over time you can develop gum disease, which can be severe enough to destroy the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth (periodontitis) and lead to tooth loss.

Heart disease. Smokeless tobacco increases your heart rate and blood pressure. Some evidence suggests that long-term use of smokeless tobacco increases your risk of dying of certain types of heart disease and stroke.

Precancerous mouth lesions. Smokeless tobacco increases your risk of developing small white patches called leukoplakia (loo-koh-PLAY-kee-uh) inside your mouth where the chew is most often placed. These mouth lesions are precancerous — meaning that the lesions could one day become cancer.


www.mayoclinic.com...

www.cancer.org...

www.cancer.gov...

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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I would just tell the boss everything going fine except
that most people that I card say its,
not convenient to shop at the convenience store anymore.

In last 5 years, I think I slide a card hit the toilet, and drive away.
Gas or toilet, but if they keep playing those dam commercials when the pump starts, I will have to find
pumps without commercials.


edit on 30-1-2012 by Gmoneycricket because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 09:13 PM
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Disgusting anti smoking ads and a liberal agendareply to post by Komaratzi11
 


since I am only getting non-smokers on my post, I was wondering if anyone on this post has anything to say....the point is ....taxpayer money is being used to beat up smokers and make them look like disgusting losers....even though there are so many other causes of lung cancer. the mom of a friend of mine just died from lung cancer and she never smoked. Why is it ok to condem and harass some groups...while others that engage in risky or disgusting behaviors should be treated with compassion. That is why the gov't has no business regulating behavior unless it is a crime against someone.

your post is good...it's time to fight back against totalitarianism.
edit on 30-1-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)



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