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Mblah's homemade fettucini!

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posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:02 AM
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Pasta is actually quite easy to make, it just takes a little time and elbow grease
Believe me it's a work out!

Mblah's Homemade Pasta




Ingredients
1 1/2 cups flour (Semolina Pasta Flour)




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


loooks goooooooooooood



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:13 AM
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I love homemade pasta...but it is a chore to make it for sure.

Thanks for sharing another recipe!

Steamed broccoli enter stage left!



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by jerryznv
I love homemade pasta...but it is a chore to make it for sure.

Thanks for sharing another recipe!

Steamed broccoli enter stage left!


MMMMM yes agreed, *drools* steamed broccoli.

I love to make pasta. I don't even like to make boxed pasta anymore, it doesn't taste right to me anymore lol My taste buds are spoiled now


I will next attempt Gnocchi! That will be fun but I need to hit up a kitchen store or Amazon for supplies lol A kitchen store to me is what Lowes or Home Depot is to a guy lol



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:21 AM
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They look delicious
im so ungry right now .. this is painfull to watch

did you make a tomato sauce ?
my bo-pere is italian and he love to make them with his pasta machine
last time he made some with seafood inside and when i cooked them
i totaly mess them up


what is the trick to cook them perfectly
5 min in the boiling water ?



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


I have had gnocchi baked (once) and it was awesome!

I'll keep my eyes open for you recipe on that...might hit the kitchen myself today and whip something up!

After seeing your dish...my belly is telling me it needs fed...my belly is angry with me for looking at that!


Awesome work though...I just saw your clams recipe too...now my belly is really getting mad!
edit on 20-1-2012 by jerryznv because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by Ben81
They look delicious
im so ungry right now .. this is painfull to watch

did you make a tomato sauce ?
my bo-pere is italian and he love to make them with his pasta machine
last time he made some with seafood inside and when i cooked them
i totaly mess them up


what is the trick to cook them perfectly
5 min in the boiling water ?


Thanks Ben
I am told I make people hungry often


I made clam sauce Mblah's Homemade Fettucini and Clam Sauce w/ Crusty Italian Bread

You want to cook the pasta or no more than 7 mins. Add olive oil to the pot of water too while boiling, keeps it from sticking. When you drain it you should also never rinse the pasta with water. Not sure who started that one lol once you drain the pasta add a little extra virgin olive oil to the pasta and mix it. Keeps it from sticking and adds a little flavor as well.

Im Italian/Sicilian and German. I LOVE to cook! I cook mostly European foods: Italian, French and German. My sister also cooks but she makes a lot of Spanish foods. We have covered most of the globe. Im working on my Middle Eastern cooking skills next. I love ME food. My sister also makes a lot of Asian style foods as well. I have made some Thai dishes, not bad I might add either.




posted on Jan, 20 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by jerryznv
 


LOL well feed your belly so it stops yelling at you


Thanks



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 06:15 AM
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Good find and great price on that Atlas 150. This is the same machine I have but buying it new I'll tell you I paid considerably more for it.

Semolina flour is not easily available here and I have great results using Mexican all-purpose flour. Most time I use whole-wheat flour, about 50% along with the regular flour. My machine instructions say to not use salt in the mix, perhaps it could cause some corrosion, so that is left out of the mix and I just cook it salted water instead.

I have the Kitchen-Aid mixer but never bought the pasta attachment. My hands are large enough I have a knack for feeding the pasta through the machine while turning the crank through the progressively thinner stages of the dough. For those who have never used a pasta machine it may be surprising to them how elongated a fist full of dough becomes around setting 6 or 7, which is about where I find it best for most pastas. A final setting of around 4 or 5 works best for spaghetti in that machine. An electric machine is good for those with smaller hands or who have trouble handling the dough and cranking the handle or is just simply easier, but there will be a few die-hards that like the manual-crank machines who like the feel of the dough.

I also use my Atlas to make wonton and eggroll wrappers, but despite the name I find it best to not use egg in these doughs or it comes out less crispy - for those I use the 8 or ultimate thinnest 9 setting on the Atlas 150 machine . I also use the machine to make crackers using spices, baking powder and/or yeast in the dough. I have a small hand-cutter with a plain and a crinkled wheel to cut the crackers, and also use the crinkle-wheel to cut my lasagne (plural form of lasagna).

Recently mentioned in other thread(s) is a need for trees or hangers to dry the pasta. A number of good budget ideas were suggested, like plastic coat hangers, but I find best to use an open rod so the pasta can be easily slid off the end without having to lift it out and likely break fully-dried pastas. For a time I used a 1/2" stainless pipe that I could fasten in the middle and have both ends free, but when in my newer kitchen I placed several rods protruding out the side of a cabinet to use as hangers.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
Good find and great price on that Atlas 150. This is the same machine I have but buying it new I'll tell you I paid considerably more for it.

Oh I have seen what they cost and yes it was a great price. I have found two things I just love from the thrift store,: my pasta maker and my iMac desktop lol both totaled less than 100
This pasta maker is great. Next week I'm going to make crab and goat meat filled ravioli attachment. I of course will post a thread




Semolina flour is not easily available here and I have great results using Mexican all-purpose flour. Most time I use whole-wheat flour, about 50% along with the regular flour. My machine instructions say to not use salt in the mix, perhaps it could cause some corrosion, so that is left out of the mix and I just cook it salted water instead.

Yea we have a variety of food stores that have great selections of flours, herbs, spices and other ingredients for cooking. I don't know if you have Publix grocery store but they always have a good selection in their bigger stores of flours and spices. I also like certain Super Target's for their spice, olive oil and flour section. This is the flour I used. My fiancee's mom actually gave me this. I use King Arthur brand usually but this stuff came out great!


I have never heard of Mexican flour. I will definitely have to try that. What would you make with that flour for instance? I have used whole wheat flour before as well. I tend to use bread flour most of the time for my breads and I have also used it for pasta. I like semolina flour though, it is great but it is expensive. If I don't have semolina flour I use semolina oil in the mix with the bread flour and eggs and I let it sit for about 3 + hrs wrapped in plastic that is brushed with the oil as well. I let it sit so the semolina can set into the pasta.

I use salt in my pasta but it's equivalent to a double pinch lol. I clean mine with a cloth. I was told to never clean them with water every time esp if you use it often. Mine I was told to wipe it with a cloth and if you needed to clean it with water, use a brush and don't put it directly on the machine. I have done that. My pasta maker gets treated well.
I cook mine in water with extra virgin olive oil.
I don't know what the instructions say, they are all in Italian.



I have the Kitchen-Aid mixer but never bought the pasta attachment. My hands are large enough I have a knack for feeding the pasta through the machine while turning the crank through the progressively thinner stages of the dough.

I have a mix like that and I don't have the attachment either. I have mastered the crank method too! lol I know what settings to put it on for what thickness I want and what pasta. It took me a while but trial and error and now my pastas have their set settings.




For those who have never used a pasta machine it may be surprising to them how elongated a fist full of dough becomes around setting 6 or 7, which is about where I find it best for most pastas. A final setting of around 4 or 5 works best for spaghetti in that machine.

I cut my pieces into smaller sections for when I feed the pasta thru because I'm only cooking for me. My noodles are half the length of most. I used 4 to roll it out and then 1 as the setting for the thickness I wanted before I cut the pasta shape but this was for fettucini. I used a higher setting for the spaghetti noodles and lasagna noodles.


An electric machine is good for those with smaller hands or who have trouble handling the dough and cranking the handle or is just simply easier, but there will be a few die-hards that like the manual-crank machines who like the feel of the dough.
I have tiny hands and love my crank
I could see why for some the electric would be easier. The crank does hurt my hand when I make lasagna lol It takes longer. I think I'm one of those die hards. I'm also one who won't use a bread machine for bread. I prefer to use my hands just like my pasta. I actually pulled my back last year between kneading and cranking that thing for 6 lasagna's I made lol. So yea I'm die hard!



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
I also use my Atlas to make wonton and eggroll wrappers, but despite the name I find it best to not use egg in these doughs or it comes out less crispy - for those I use the 8 or ultimate thinnest 9 setting on the Atlas 150 machine .

Oh really?! I have to try that. I like wonton wrappers. I made a Middle Eastern dish that requires them, it's a type of ravioli. I actually made a thread but not many looked at it. It doesn't look at that good but damn it was delicious! I would like to make my own wrappers and play around with the shapes and make this again. The egg suggestion is a good one I will keep that in mind when I make them. Thanks!



I also use the machine to make crackers using spices, baking powder and/or yeast in the dough. I have a small hand-cutter with a plain and a crinkled wheel to cut the crackers, and also use the crinkle-wheel to cut my lasagne (plural form of lasagna).

You make crackers?! Oh I so want to do that! I am not sure I know what a crinkled wheel is. I will have to look at what those are. I cut my lasagna with a knife and then I use a press that you would use on fondant to make the shape on the ends. Maybe I should get one of these crinkled wheels
I would love to make something like a wheat thin! I will have to put this on my to do list.


Recently mentioned in other thread(s) is a need for trees or hangers to dry the pasta. A number of good budget ideas were suggested, like plastic coat hangers, but I find best to use an open rod so the pasta can be easily slid off the end without having to lift it out and likely break fully-dried pastas. For a time I used a 1/2" stainless pipe that I could fasten in the middle and have both ends free, but when in my newer kitchen I placed several rods protruding out the side of a cabinet to use as hangers.
I loved the coat hanger idea lol I actually was about to use my lens holder for my telescope lenses. I dont have two chairs and completely forgot about the hanger idea and where I saw it then I saw it on here last night and laughed. I went to my fiancee's mom's so use her kitchen to roll, cut and dry the pasta. My kitchen is so small lol. An open rod is something I could do when I have the drop table put up for the pasta maker. I could use a curtain rod in the kitchen. The size will allow that at least, most tubs are wider
I might have to do the rod thing in my kitchen. I can put one at the top and I can use a step stool to hang them. I use one for everything else that wouldn't be a problem. Again, thanks for the idea!

You always give me good ideas for my kitchen and I have tried many of your cooking suggestions too btw. I like learning new ways to do things esp when it's in cooking.



posted on Jan, 21 2012 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by mblahnikluver

I have never heard of Mexican flour. I will definitely have to try that. What would you make with that flour for instance?


Oh, just about everything. Here in Mexico that is what we have. It doesn't have the same grading system as in the US and I don't know what might be the equivalent, our cakes are harder and weigh half a ton. In many instances, like tres leches, the cakes are sold wet with milk or other liquids, in which case they weigh a full ton.

A couple hours away, outside Guadalajara along the north shore of Lake Chapala there is a huge gringo retirement community where I visit with my wife. She was completely blown-away that there is an American village in her native land and gets to have the American experience. She loves the food there and now cooks a lot of those things at home, especially loves BBQ ribs. There is quite a contrast in American-style baked goods. There are now a lot of new huge supermarkets in our own city, Morelia, that stock American items, Walmart, Costco, Sam's Club, to name a few. Betty Crocker or Duncan Hines cake mixes now dominate our pantry, otherwise the Mexican varieties or scratch-made cakes and baked goods again are hard and heavy in comparison. The Mexican variety of flour makes good pasta and bread though.

She loves the American breakfasts at those restaurants around Chapala. I was able to buy Bisquick there and pre-mix biscuit mix for her at home so she can just add water to make them. We are just now starting to find Bisquick mix in a couple of stores here but it comes in very small boxes and seems more expensive than need be. Scratch-made biscuits in small batches can vary quite a bit so I find it best to mix a big batch of flour to be used a little at a time or buy Bisquick.

A lot of items are not routinely available here but that seems to be changing rapidly now. American items are catching on here.



posted on Jan, 23 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Wow I keep forgetting you are in Mexico. That is cool!

My fiancee's friend lives in Mexico and he said the food there was amazing because of all the ingredients they use that we can't get here very easily, if at all. He said I would love it. I told him when we go there i want to eat at some of the places he went to! I love home made food in little off shoot places. They always seem to have the best food, anywhere I have been that seems to ring true.

I like Mexican food, but it's been very Americanized here so I dont think I get true Mexican. There was a restaurant where I use to live that was run by a family of Mexicans. Nobody spoke English and they all rotated through out the months. The parents and one other person spoke English, they ran it. They were very cool and said that it helps their family back home. They would tell us it helped payed for their families educations and trips here to the US. I thought what they did for their family was amazing and they had kick ass food. They have two restaurants and both are always busy! I haven't been there in 4yrs and Im itching to go back!

I will have to see if I can get some Mexican flour somewhere online and ty and make something with it.

Again thanks for your replies! You seem like a great cook yourself.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


There are a number of items available here not always easily available elsewhere, but in California there are a number of Mexican supermarkets that stock Mexican brands and items. I do believe many Mexican products are "healthier", like our sugar that is brownish and less refined. The reverse is that Mexico does not typically have a lot of American items, however I live in a large city, Morelia - the capital of the state of Michoacán, and have more available to me than many people living here. I'd really love a good, thick hot pastrami sandwich but that's not likely to happen any time soon. There is a greater influx of American retirees recently - imagine that - and American products are becoming more available, though my city despite its size has few of us - I am the only gringo in my neighborhood. I believe, though, I am a decent goodwill ambassador and speak to my neighbors through the stomach to their hearts with food.

I love your recipes and particularly the way you use your fresh ingredients. Recipes are quite variable so it's always great to get a new take on a dish. I have the advantage of being "old" and fairly well financially healed so was able to put together a nice kitchen with space and a few gadgets that enable me to make restaurant-quality foods at home. I sometimes feel this is unfair to those like you who could really make magic happen in a kitchen like mine. Real food "purists" and true chefs would likely want to keep me away from the stove as I am kind of an untrained, undisciplined hack but I do enjoy cooking and have somewhat of a knack with flavors.

I'm curious where your Mexican friends live, it's a big country with a lot of regional variations. I am in middle of the middle of Mexico, almost exactly halfway between Mexico City and Guadalajara in the central highlands. Be sure to U2U me if you get anywhere close to this part of the country. This is a friendly place with some rich tradition and is well worth visiting. This is a great place to live and a slice of paradise right here.

Keep those recipes coming. I love it.

edit on 24-1-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


this is so good. I made this exact recipe about 2 weeks ago for the family, my wife had never had home made pasta and now she's addicted.



posted on Jan, 24 2012 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by blair56
reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


this is so good. I made this exact recipe about 2 weeks ago for the family, my wife had never had home made pasta and now she's addicted.


LOL thanks


I just responded to your pasta thread then I saw your post here. haha
seems we both have pasta fever


Yup it is addicting because it really isnt that hard and with a pasta maker/cuter omg it's great! I am going to make ravioli this weekend I think. Not sure yet there are a few other pasta's I'd like to try before I do ravioli lol.






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