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Sounds of the sea: Listen online to the ocean floor, but some don't want you to!

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posted on Jan, 17 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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Satellite photos used to be for military eyes only, but Google Earth changed all that. Now something similar is happening to the ocean depths, with any web user able to listen in and "surf the sea floor" - and the US Navy is not happy.

www.bbc.co.uk...

And what about Freedom of Information???

Not only is this a great educational tool for school kids all over the world which could be aimed at them in the hope that they will someday help to know what lies beneath the waves, seeing as so much is yet to be discovered down there, I'm sure that many of us normal Joe's would love to listen along to some of the sounds of the deep.

I was listening to the samples given on the link and the Orca are fantastic. I could listen to that for hours and get deeply meditated on nature.

The incredible sound of the earthquake off Japan that caused so much damage (and still is) is jaw dropping.

Then we come the the sound of the big motor yacht.. and this is what's got the US navy's panties in a twist.. or so they'd like you to believe...
They claim that this tool will enable any enemy to help position and/or identify any naval vessel in the oceans. Yet the US currently has listening posts all over the globe and can do exactly that to any nation that has the ability to float a paper boat.

Why does the US navy feel it needs to police the ocean and also reduce the freedom of information to every other being on the planet?

There could be a far deeper reason behind this. A reason that would normally have led me to post this in the UFO/Alien forum.

Over many years, people have reported flying objects entering or exiting the oceans around the world. Some people are convinced there are Alien bases on the sea floor and are in constant use.

What if this method of listening to the oceans had the ability to reveal these sounds? Nobody can police the skies but water is an object that can be controlled and the sounds that come from it can be censored.

What if there are highly secret military bases under the ocean that do some rather nasty types of work/experiments?

What if any 'future tech' weapons are hidden in the oceans and are being used in order to create volcanoes, earthquakes or even severe weather?

What if they can all be heard? It only takes someone with a bit of savvy and a bit of time to sit and listen and record all that they hear.. Over time you would be able to compile and entire library of the sounds of the seas and something, somewhere, is going to be completely out of place.

What can you hear? What if their censoring misses something unusual? Could we end up with data that gets the same old tampering effects as we see from many a moon landing photo?

LISTEN TO THE DEEP!!!!




edit on 17-1-2012 by Extralien because: added further link

edit on 17-1-2012 by Extralien because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 17 2012 @ 07:20 PM
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WOW....no replies? This is cool! Thankyou so much for the link. I was listening to the areas around Japan. Did you? It sounds so different than the others. The sounds are low, but almost make your ears hurt if you listen for a few minutes. Wonder why? It's not loud, but it is just a odd sound.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 04:31 AM
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reply to post by StealthyKat
 


I'm glad you like it.
I was sat listening to them for hours last night. Was fascinating. Especially the dolphins etc in the East Sicily site.

Being able to determine the sounds in the graph is an extra bonus as you can see what noise is coming next.

Not sure on how effective the radar is yet though.

If I'm right, the sounds coming in from the Japan sites could very possibly be volcanic eruptions from the ocean floor.. that's what it made me think of.. I might be wrong but it was still incredible to listen to.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 04:42 AM
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Thanks OP great stuff. If only we knew of the limitations that have been imposed by the MIC, fear and secrets have literally kept us from discoveries of importance to our species and indeed the world as a whole. Reminds me a little of the hypocritical nature in which celebrities/elite can have access to and indeed own satellite networks, and yet we haven't even introduced these things to the greater public, one can especially imagine the benefit of these technologies in schools and libraries. Dividing a finite planet over an undefined variable number of people is ridiculous, when will we wake up and accept all for all.



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 06:00 AM
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Originally posted by usernamehere
Thanks OP great stuff. If only we knew of the limitations that have been imposed by the MIC, fear and secrets have literally kept us from discoveries of importance to our species and indeed the world as a whole. Reminds me a little of the hypocritical nature in which celebrities/elite can have access to and indeed own satellite networks, and yet we haven't even introduced these things to the greater public, one can especially imagine the benefit of these technologies in schools and libraries. Dividing a finite planet over an undefined variable number of people is ridiculous, when will we wake up and accept all for all.


Very valid point. And if you read near the bottom of the report, you'll find this;

The US Navy says it hopes to work out similar arrangements with other ocean monitoring projects elsewhere in the world. But Cornell University ocean acoustics expert Christopher Clark doubts it will succeed. "The strategy they're using with Neptune (the Vancouver project) is a dead end," he says.

Clark insists the US Navy doesn't own the ocean acoustic environment and should accept that what was once military technology is now in the hands of civilians. "The cat's out of the bag, the horses are out of the barn, whatever the metaphor is, it's happening," he says.

The number of observatories on Michel Andre's website is growing. The site currently links to listening networks only in the northern hemisphere.

Soon 11 more will be added, connecting to microphones in the South Pacific, South Atlantic and the southern Indian Ocean.
www.bbc.co.uk...

Wont be too long and we'll be able to listen to a vast majority of the ocean. This is a good step forwards for many people, especially those who wish to learn. And again, it's good that things like this are giving a two fingered salute to TPTB




posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 06:21 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


Yes, that's what I thought too....I'm lovin it! If you know of any other links like it please let me know. I gave you an S&F!



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 07:42 AM
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wow thank you for pointing me towards that site.
On the first listen it just sounds like dull white noise, but when you crank the volume up and take notice of the key that identifies what the different clicks and tones are then it's actually pretty fascinating.

It's like a dolphin / whale chat room down there

edit on 18-1-2012 by davespanners because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2012 @ 08:19 AM
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I remember some time ago.
they sold off the listening things on the sea bed.
the ones used to listen for subs and boats.
so they have something new.
the old stuff is No secret.




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