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Odd pulsating radio signal on 14.320MHz

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posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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I have been hearing an odd signal on 14.320 MHz, since December 30th, 2011. It sends our regular, long pulses at a rate of about 50 per minute. 37 pulses in a row are at one audio frequency, then there is a slight pause, and then 37 more pulses are heard at a lower or higher frequency. Two audio frequencies alternate. I can hear the signal as I write this at 19:57 Universal Time. The signal has been strongest at around 22:00 UT. This frequency is within a band reserved for Amateur radio, but the 'hams' don't seem to know what to make of it. Can anyone else hear this signal, and, perhaps, identify it? Ross




posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by Ross 54
 


its a solar flair



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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HMM, are the hams picking this signal up, local operators, or is this signal being picked up all around the world.?? I have two ham radios, Ill turn one on, in a bit and check that out



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Ross 54
 


When I use sdr.dyndns.org...
14320 khz.. I only hear white noise




posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:15 PM
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It could be HAARP . The frequency is a a little high , but not by much.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by SupersonicSerpent
reply to post by Ross 54
 


its a solar flair


Lol, I would love for you to showyour case for that quick and short reply


Sadly the truth is it could be anything as there's a lot of QRM (noise) accross the whole of the HF spectrum now (also VHF and even UHF), mainly down to bad allocations by Ofcom in the UK, or FCC in America, or (insert country of choices radio authority here).

HF is the area your frequency is, and sadly that's the worst band affected.

I'm a ham and know only too well of the problems, mainly caused by unproperly regulated domestic wired and wireless devices such as modems and senders etc.

Read more here: www.ukqrm.org...



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:17 PM
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The first thing I thought when I saw your Threads Title, was that it was a Time Code but, I cant seem to find any allocation of freq for a time code.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by Ross 54
 


If I tune 14.320 LSB I hear a series of tones (1kHz there about). Typically we'd use USB at that frequency. Sounds like someone may be running a beacon (to measure propagation). That is a fairly popular frequency on the 20m band.



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by SupersonicSerpent
reply to post by Ross 54
 


its a solar flair


WOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!

Second line

By the way, it is spelled flare



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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reply to post by DragonRain311
 


Think you mean spelt Lol



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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Thanks, everyone, for your responses. I don't know how widely the signal is being heard. Hams in the Western part of the United States seem to know about it. (I'm in Northern California) It's been as strong as S. 9 (4 bars) at one point, so might be very widely heard. *** I read on the HAARP website that their transmitter has been 'locked out' of Amateur Radio frequencies, so as not to interfere with them. *** I don't believe a time signal station would be allowed in the 20 meter amateur band. In any case, the pulses count out ~1.2 second intervals, not 1 second, even, as time signal stations do. *** If this is a beacon of some sort, I don't believe it's being run by hams. It never sends an identifying call sign, as they are required to do at frequent intervals. Ross



posted on Jan, 9 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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When I transmit FM my wifi modem produces the same type of noise.

Could be some beacon as mentioned above. Worst case you have some bug in your house transmitting. Interesting test if you don't have any measuring devices is to pull the main switch for a few minutes and check if the signal is still there if not you can work your way down to eliminate all possible suspects.

If you really can't find it I suggest to measure on different locations to see if the signal is there as well (100m, 1km, 10km).



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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It's not local or anything in the OP's house or to do with WiFi. I'm in New England and was able to pick the signal up yesterday afternoon (the ~1kHz beeps) and then later in the evening I caught the lower frequency (~500Hz) beeps through significant QRM/QRN/QSB. Very faint now at 13:38UTC (~1kHz beeps). Almost certainly a beacon of some sort although as pointed out, not following required operating practices nor using the accpeted sideband for the frequency.



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 09:26 AM
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reply to post by scotsdavy1
 



Spelt is English, spelled is the American version.

au.answers.yahoo.com...



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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The 20 meter band plan calls for beacons at 14.100 MHz. Following the band plan is voluntary, but is generally considered good amateur practice. In addition, it makes sense that a beacon would be placed where most people would be listening for them. It seems very unlikely that a ham would go to the trouble to set up a beacon and then fail to identify it. The whole purpose of a beacon is to ascertain that signals can be heard from a specific area. Sending unidentified signals, especially in a persistent manner like this, is contrary to regulations, and could get the person responsible in serious trouble. Ross



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 02:18 PM
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Stereo Ahead HI1 , the planet there has a nifty light flashing beat
also check out the last image while ur at it here, whats entering the left hand side of the screen?






posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by Ross 54
 


As we've mentioned. However, there's no indication it's amateur. I happened to turn on my rig a short time ago and caught a male voice saying in English ',,,broadcasting on 14.320 AM'. The voice didn't come back. It sounded recorded and was clearly not an amateur operator. Pirate radio maybe?



posted on Jan, 10 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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If a pirate broadcaster is starting up at or near 14.320, the pulses could have been meant to draw attention, and/or to test a transmitter. I've been listening to the frequency from time to time for the past 2 &1/2 hours, or so,; heard nothing but the usual ham traffic. Pirate broadcasts often occur just outside ham bands, so that amateur equipment can be used. Such broadcasts within a ham band are more unusual. Ross
edit on 10-1-2012 by Ross 54 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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Heard the signal this morning, as early as 16:22 UT. Signal was ~ S. 5, at best. Heard intermittently through about 17:00 UT. Signal is typically intermittent; fading in and out, and seeming to turn on and off suddenly, at times. Anyone wishing to hear this signal must be prepared to listen persistently. Getting an idea of where the signal can be heard should help indicate where it might be located. Signal turned back on as I wrote this, at 17:40 UT, strength up to ~ S. 5, here in Northern California. Ross



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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Signal heard continuously now, since last post. Growing stronger; noted as strong as S. 7 at 17:52 UT. Ross



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