Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Odd pulsating radio signal on 14.320MHz

page: 6
9
<< 3  4  5   >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 11:51 AM
link   
Just doing some digging around and it looks like they are digital pictures. Don't know anything at all about this stuff but here is a link to what I found. Digital SSTV Nets & Frequencies:

Source

If you do a search for the 14.320 on that page you will find this....same 20 meters you are talking about and looks like 18:00 UTC is the time they are sending whatever pics they are sending.



* * * * * * * * * 20 meters: (USB) Every day 14.233 MHz 20 Meter Band Digital SSTV Call Freq. Every day 14.240 MHz Australia Every day 14.320 MHz TX Waco (AOR) W5NCD Larry Tuesday 18:00 UTC 14.236 MHz CO Denver W0LMD Robert


Hope that helps!




posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:14 PM
link   
Apparently it is coming from Larry Bush in Waco, TX. And I would be VERY careful looking any more into it as it appears this is a very convenient way to transfer porn that you don't want to be caught with......no censorship and one of the registered stations for Larry's call sign is a sex site. So...just a heads up.

Seems the 20 meter thing is also related to porn:

Source
edit on 4/4/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:24 PM
link   
Really!?!
That kind of deflates interest.
In the past I used to open images as text and play with it, and the data that I decoded reminded me of that.
I hadn't relized that this was a thing ham operators could do.

As a side note, since starting, I've always used waterfall while listening. I noticed that the data, while sounding similar to Domino, the waterfall picture was more like Olivia or JT65.
Is there an easy way to screen grab a live waterfall?



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:57 PM
link   

shadow watcher
Really!?!
That kind of deflates interest.
In the past I used to open images as text and play with it, and the data that I decoded reminded me of that.
I hadn't relized that this was a thing ham operators could do.

As a side note, since starting, I've always used waterfall while listening. I noticed that the data, while sounding similar to Domino, the waterfall picture was more like Olivia or JT65.
Is there an easy way to screen grab a live waterfall?


I wouldn't take my word for it, just what I was able to find after a few minutes of digging around. I could be COMPLETELY wrong on it as I know absolutely nothing about HAM radio or frequencies or whatever in that realm.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 02:28 PM
link   
The 37 pulsing signal heard briefly and weakly at 16:45 GMT, then again, much stronger from 18:30, onward. Still well heard as I type this at 19:28.
I've heard many slow scan television images sent by hams on 20 meters. None of them ever sounded like this. The customary frequency for these is around 14.230 MHz. I consulted a number of lists of Amateur Radio SSTV nets and found this frequency, plus or minus a few kiloHertz, to be the one used.
I believe the one listing of one net at 14.320 MHz to be an instance of someone accidently transposing the numbers 2 and 3, hence .320, instead of .230 .
I reviewed a great many audio files of different signal modes, when this signal first appeared, a couple of years ago. None of them bore any real resemblance to what I was hearing.
edit on 4-4-2014 by Ross 54 because: added clarifying word



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 03:36 PM
link   
Pulsing signal heard today from 19:07 GMT. Conditions on 20 meters were poor. At one point the only propagation beacon I could hear was the one here in northern California. I only heard that because its signal path to my location is nearly line-of-sight.
Little ham traffic, also. I could identify only a few stations, in the western and midwestern parts of North America. Most were in southern California, or in states neighboring this state.

These observations limit the areas where the transmitter of the pulsing signal could probably be located, given a conventional signal path from transmitter to receiver.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:10 PM
link   
37 pulsing signal heard from 19:36 GMT, today. I note that every other sequence of 37 pulses has a shortened last pulse. That gives an average pulse count of about 36 & 3/4. It's not clear what the significance of this might be, if anything. The frequency seems to be just about exactly 14.319 MHz, as established by zero-beating the signal. 20 meter band conditions poor for long distance reception. Few other signals heard, and only the propagation beacon almost local to my location. Signal gradually grew stronger. Still heard at 20:08.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:30 PM
link   
Signal heard to start up strongly at 19:51 GMT. I have been thinking--- When the signal displayed extra, weaker pulses, interspersed with the usual ones, a few days ago, I tended to think that there could be another transmitter in the picture, or a change in the pulsing format. Perhaps that was wrong.
It could have been round-the world propagation, from a not-too-distant transmitter. The short path providing the stronger pulses, the round-the-world path supplying the weaker, interspersed pulses, delayed slightly by their longer trip. It takes a radio wave about 1/7 of a second to go all the way around the world. The way the secondary pulses faded in and out, even more than the usual ones, tends to support this possibility.
In order for the time delay to be long enough to be perceived as an echo, the transmitter would have to be substantially closer in one direction, than in the other.





new topics

top topics



 
9
<< 3  4  5   >>

log in

join