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Federal reserve notes vs us coins

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posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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Who owns the coins in our country? The fed or the us mint? Can someone please explain that to me?
Thanks. Kooler.




posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by KoolerKing
 




What does it say up the top?

Federal Reserve Note.

The FED lends money to the US with interest attached.

All FED notes actually represent a debt to the FED.

Enough said.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Exactly! there are many threads on ATS about the fed. Use the search engine it is your friend. There is a wealth of knowledge to gain.
edit on 13-12-2011 by cocolopez because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by KoolerKing
 


Ummmmmm the US Treasury "owns" all coins and all printed Dollars? The Federal Reserve cannot "print" anything, only Congress dictates how much of the currency is printed.. so a printed dollar would have the same relation as a coin.

Congress also holds the Charter for the Federal Reserve, all actions by the Federal Reserve are done with special permission from Congress to act on their behalf .. if at anytime Congress decides they do not like the Federal Reserve the Charter can be revoked and the Reserve dissolved. It would then revert to a National Bank structure under the control of the Treasury, however our last National Bank failed miserably because politicians totally jacked things up.. which is why the Federal Reserve's actions are not directly controlled by Congress.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 




Enough said.


And what does the Federal Reserve do with the interest?
Return it to the Treasury..

Educate yourself.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 




Enough said.


And what does the Federal Reserve do with the interest?
Return it to the Treasury..

Educate yourself.
No it doesn't. The interest gets paid out as profits to the shareholders.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by DarthMuerte
 



Is there difference between the fed notes and us coins? The coins are not notes and nowhere on a coin does it say the federal reserve.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by KoolerKing
reply to post by DarthMuerte
 



Is there difference between the fed notes and us coins? The coins are not notes and nowhere on a coin does it say the federal reserve.
It is still fiat currency. There is no backing for it aside from "belief" that it has value. So, to answer your question, there is no difference other than the materials from which they are made.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


Thank you Darth.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


Thank you Darth.
edit on 13-12-2011 by KoolerKing because: none



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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i see where your coming from, no questions is dumb if you really dont know



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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Originally posted by KoolerKing
reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


Thank you Darth.
No problem. May I ask what drove you to ask the question? Were you looking for some sort of "loophole" or "back door" in the system?



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


There are no share holders of the Federal Reserve. Again. Educate your self on FACTS not you-tube videos.

PS. Gold has no backing but "faith" that it's worth something. No different than a Dollar bill.
edit on 12/13/2011 by Rockpuck because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


There are no share holders of the Federal Reserve. Again. Educate your self on FACTS not you-tube videos.

PS. Gold has no backing but "faith" that it's worth something. No different than a Dollar bill.
edit on 12/13/2011 by Rockpuck because: (no reason given)
Maybe you need the education?

The Fed is privately owned. Its shareholders are private banks. In fact, 100% of its shareholders are private banks. None of its stock is owned by the government.

The twelve regional Federal Reserve Banks, which were established by Congress as the operating arms of the nation’s central banking system, are organized much like private corporations – possibly leading to some confusion about "ownership." For example, the Reserve Banks issue shares of stock to member banks. However, owning Reserve Bank stock is quite different from owning stock in a private company. The Reserve Banks are not operated for profit, and ownership of a certain amount of stock is, by law, a condition of membership in the System. The stock may not be sold, traded, or pledged as security for a loan; dividends are, by law, 6 percent per year."

The interest on bonds acquired with its newly-issued Federal Reserve Notes pays the Fed’s operating expenses plus a guaranteed 6% return to its banker shareholders. A mere 6% a year may not be considered a profit in the world of Wall Street high finance, but most businesses that manage to cover all their expenses and give their shareholders a guaranteed 6% return are considered "for profit" corporations.

In addition to this guaranteed 6%, the banks will now be getting interest from the taxpayers on their "reserves." The basic reserve requirement set by the Federal Reserve is 10%. The website of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York explains that as money is redeposited and relent throughout the banking system, this 10% held in "reserve" can be fanned into ten times that sum in loans; that is, $10,000 in reserves becomes $100,000 in loans. Federal Reserve Statistical Release H.8 puts the total "loans and leases in bank credit" as of September 24, 2008 at $7,049 billion. Ten percent of that is $700 billion. That means we the taxpayers will be paying interest to the banks on at least $700 billion annually – this so that the banks can retain the reserves to accumulate interest on ten times that sum in loans.

The banks earn these returns from the taxpayers for the privilege of having the banks’ interests protected by an all-powerful independent private central bank, even when those interests may be opposed to the taxpayers’ -- for example, when the banks use their special status as private money creators to fund speculative derivative schemes that threaten to collapse the U.S. economy. Among other special benefits, banks and other financial institutions (but not other corporations) can borrow at the low Fed funds rate of about 2%. They can then turn around and put this money into 30-year Treasury bonds at 4.5%, earning an immediate 2.5% from the taxpayers, just by virtue of their position as favored banks. A long list of banks (but not other corporations) is also now protected from the short selling that can crash the price of other stocks.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by DarthMuerte
 

You have accidentally forgotten to provide a source for your quote. Here it is. You also forgot to use an ex tag or quote tag to indicate material that is not yours. They are available in the usual place.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 05:10 PM
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While it is very close to what I wrote, it is not the same.


The Federal Reserve System fulfills its public mission as an independent entity within government. It is not "owned" by anyone and is not a private, profit-making institution.

As the nation's central bank, the Federal Reserve derives its authority from the Congress of the United States. It is considered an independent central bank because its monetary policy decisions do not have to be approved by the President or anyone else in the executive or legislative branches of government, it does not receive funding appropriated by the Congress, and the terms of the members of the Board of Governors span multiple presidential and congressional terms.
Actually this part basically contradicts what I wrote, or at least puts a "friendly spin" on it. I also did not say anything about the board of governors. It is interesting to note that several of those governors are also directors of very large banks.



posted on Dec, 13 2011 @ 07:07 PM
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reply to post by DarthMuerte
 


Any bank that does business in multiple states (National Banks) are "Member Banks" of the Federal Reserve.

The Federal Reserve's Member Banks make up the Regional Reserve Banks. They elect the officers that run the regional banks (for instance the New York Reserve Bank.)

The Federal Reserve's officers (Board Members and Chairman) are selected by CONGRESS These are called the Governors, and only Congress may choose their offices. Congress can also fire any of these 7 Governors at any time for any reason.

The Member Banks which represents EVERY National banks and many regional/state banks do not Own a portion of the Federal Reserve, the Reserve is not an entity to be owned, it is a Board, with over 3,400 Members being represented by the Board.

This why whenever the Reserve Banks "own" something it's always in the form of an LLC (Maiden Lane) to act as a holder (or bad bank) And the actual policy setting comes from the 7 Governors and 5 of the 12 Reserve Banks.

Interest on Securities (2.6 trillion held) is returned to the Treasury I understand your thick skull is resistant to this notion, but it is a fact it's not an opinion.

www.washingtonpost.com...
In 2009 the Federal Reserve reported a $45 billion dollar profit, all of which was returned to the Treasury.

The Fed will return about $45 billion to the U.S. Treasury for 2009, according to calculations by The Washington Post based on public documents. That reflects the highest earnings in the 96-year history of the central bank. The Fed, unlike most government agencies, funds itself from its own operations and returns its profits to the Treasury.


I don't like the Federal Reserve system because banks influence policy that is not in the interest of the People. I don't like it because it lacks transparency with specific investment vehicles and short term loan operations with Member Banks and international banks (which are forbidden from being Member Banks by the way)

There. I've educated you. Whether you're intelligent enough to listen is entirely up to you. I'm all for hating the Fed and bashing it to pieces.. but only if it's done absent stupidity.


(edit to add that Fractional Reserve Banking is a banking philosophy that has nothing to do with the actual Federal Reserve.. guidelines exist to limit the extent in which the deposit spreads have to be maintained are indeed supposed to be enforced by the Reserve, there are also several other Government agencies that are supposed to watch the same thing.)
edit on 12/13/2011 by Rockpuck because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 29 2012 @ 10:30 AM
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posted in wrong thread sorry
edit on 29-2-2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



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