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Quick....walk for your lives!!!!

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posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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Giant snails invade southern Florida.
www.local10.com...
Introducing species into an environment like south Florida is asking for trouble. Once they are freed there is
Plenty of water, weather that never gets cold enough to be threatening, and plenty in the way of food sources. Be it indigenous animal or plant, many species are in trouble because some goon let his pet iguana, snake, lizard, or what have you loose. There have even been reports of people setting piranha free in local lakes, causing the lakes to have to be drained. Killing all life that resides within.

Just wanted to raise awareness.




posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:10 PM
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Yep, there are cobras in the Everglades now. Hadn't heard about the piranha though.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 





Introducing species into an environment like south Florida is asking for trouble.


Yea just imagine how the indigenous animals felt when we humans introduced ourselves to their habitat.

Human, the most invasive species known.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by TheLieWeLive
reply to post by Wetpaint72
 





Introducing species into an environment like south Florida is asking for trouble.


Yea just imagine how the indigenous animals felt when we humans introduced ourselves to their habitat.

Human, the most invasive species known.


I humbly bow to your point dear sir!

And as if we weren't enough, we bring our pets, and disease.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by sonofliberty1776
 


I had not heard about the cobras, but a friend of mine who has lives here all his life told me of two separate instances he knew of with the piranha. In fact a guy I work with has two in a tank, or at least he says he does. I would think they would be illegal.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


wow! the mention at the end of that article, the cost and time involved is really quite something. i wonder how cargo import centers, distribution points and warehouse do manage to keep unwanted critters away. often articles about ports tell of staggering amounts of goods incoming around the clock.

i wonder if cargo most prone to be carrying unwanted critters is subjected to spraying, submersion in a liquid or some other aggressive treatment to minimize or eliminate infestation.

i've seen one or two documentaries about cargo ports in the NYC area but they were all about the immense cranes and the speed & efficiency with which those workers must move. incredibly dangerous way to make a living for those workers.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 





Human, the most invasive species known.


Have you never heard of cockroaches, ants, aphids, and a multitude of other insects that shame humans in terms of invasion. Then there is, of course, viruses and bacteria. I don't know a lot about a whole lot of things but I know what I know if you know what I mean, and I know humans are not by any stretch of the imagination the most invasive species known.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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Hmmmm.I did come up with two more thoughts...
1. Can you eat them.
2. Anyone else thinking rock salt in some shotgun shells.

Ok one more.

3.I'm surprised Mcdonalds hasn't found a way to supersize escargot.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


Well, the giant rats and giant pythons need giant prey to eat.....just filling out the food chain



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by BadBoYeed
 


It's like the flippin land of the lost down here!



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by Wetpaint72
 


Awe, they're so cute!



We should scoop them up for pets, that'll teach 'em!



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 07:10 PM
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Originally posted by Jean Paul Zodeaux
reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 





Human, the most invasive species known.


Have you never heard of cockroaches, ants, aphids, and a multitude of other insects that shame humans in terms of invasion. Then there is, of course, viruses and bacteria. I don't know a lot about a whole lot of things but I know what I know if you know what I mean, and I know humans are not by any stretch of the imagination the most invasive species known.





How many of those species have made it into space?



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 07:29 PM
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In a survival situation these snails could come in handy, don't you think? They're similar to lobster, kind of bland until you dip them in butter and garlic.
edit on 15-9-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by aorAki
 





How many of those species have made it into space?



Recent studies confirm that a variety of bacteria and fungi can be isolated, using standard isolation media, from the stratosphere at heights of up to 61km. These microbes are essentially the same as those found on Earth and the obvious assumption is that they are transferred from Earth to the stratosphere. However, the tropopause is usually thought to acts as barrier to the movement of particles of the size of microorganisms, so it is difficult to explain how, in those studies where volcanic transfer has been excluded, how microbes reach heights of 20km and above. Here, we conclude that a mixed population of bacteria exist in the stratosphere, some coming in from space (i.e. those present in particle clumps exceeding ten microns in size) and others, exiting from Earth.


journalofcosmology.com...


On April 20, 1967, the unmanned lunar lander Surveyor 3 landed near Oceanus Procellarum on the surface of the moon. One of the things aboard was a television camera. Two-and-a-half years later, on November 20, 1969, Apollo 12 astronauts Pete Conrad and Alan L. Bean recovered the camera. When NASA scientists examined it back on Earth they were surprised to find specimens of Streptococcus mitis that were still alive. Because of the precautions the astronauts had taken, NASA could be sure that the germs were inside the camera when it was retrieved, so they must have been there before the Surveyor 3 was launched. These bacteria had survived for 31 months in the vacuum of the moon's atmosphere. Perhaps NASA shouldn't have been surprised, because there are other bacteria that thrive under near-vacuum pressure on the earth today. Anyway, we now know that the vacuum of space is not a fatal problem for bacteria.


www.panspermia.org...


Bacteria taken from the scrumptiously named fishing village of Beer on Britain's south coast have proven themselves some of the hardiest organisms on Earth -- or in space for that matter. Bacteria found in rocks taken from the cliffs at Beer have survived a grueling year-and-a-half exposure to space conditions on the exterior of the ISS and returned home alive, becoming the longest-lived photosynthesizing microbes to survive in space.


www.popsci.com...

Google can be a useful tool when you know how to use it and are willing to do so.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by Wetpaint72
Hmmmm.I did come up with two more thoughts...
1. Can you eat them.
2. Anyone else thinking rock salt in some shotgun shells.

Ok one more.

3.I'm surprised Mcdonalds hasn't found a way to supersize escargot.


Wont help if you're in the middle of a Snail Stampede.
I recommend an Elephant gun just to be sure.

But that's a very good question can they be eaten? Not that I've ever had any myself. We can help our trade imbalance by exporting them to the french.


edit on 15-9-2011 by SemperGumby because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by SemperGumby

Originally posted by Wetpaint72
Hmmmm.I did come up with two more thoughts...
1. Can you eat them.
2. Anyone else thinking rock salt in some shotgun shells.

Ok one more.

3.I'm surprised Mcdonalds hasn't found a way to supersize escargot.


Wont help if you're in the middle of a Snail Stampede.
I recommend an Elephant gun just to be sure.

But that's a very good question can they be eaten? Not that I've ever had any myself. We can help our trade imbalance by exporting them to the french.


edit on 15-9-2011 by SemperGumby because: (no reason given)


Dang especially if they're sold by the pound!



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
In a survival situation these snails could come in handy, don't you think? They're similar to lobster, kind of bland until you dip them in butter and garlic.
edit on 15-9-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)


And they are very slow...easier than shooting fish in a barrel....more like picking fruit.....s l o w m o v i n g f r u I t ...



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:27 PM
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Originally posted by Jean Paul Zodeaux


Google can be a useful tool when you know how to use it and are willing to do so.


You, sir, are assuming I didn't know this and that it wasn't a leading question in your favour....
Thanks for the snide remark though.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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oh my im gonna need a bigger pot for those

is it wrong im salivating already

they provide good nourishment, and its not like they are hard to hunt..

also their poo is where all the goodies are.

good food


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by Jean Paul Zodeaux
reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 





Human, the most invasive species known.


Have you never heard of cockroaches, ants, aphids, and a multitude of other insects that shame humans in terms of invasion. Then there is, of course, viruses and bacteria. I don't know a lot about a whole lot of things but I know what I know if you know what I mean, and I know humans are not by any stretch of the imagination the most invasive species known.





Your point is taken and a great one but I still have to comment: Ask the countries that are invaded and conquered if they would rather have the insects or humans invade them. Your correct in what you say but I guess what I'm saying is that humans have a large effect on any area they invade also. We will not only change the way you live, we will change your belief system if given the chance. How many insects convert you against your will?
edit on 15-9-2011 by TheLieWeLive because: can't spell tonight.



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