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Betelgeuse Supernova

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posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 


NO, not the size of our own sun, NOT. Your saying that when this thing goes and the light finally reaches us that this will light up the night sky brighter or as bright as our moon AND will BE LARGER IN SIZE than our moon.


edit on 4-9-2011 by cloaked4u because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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Originally posted by cloaked4u
in the pic they have for an illustration and how they exsplain it is a LIE. That is soooooo far away that, that large of a pic the same size of our own sun. NO WAY to big. Beetlejuice will just flicker and then no light will be seen in the night sky. BEETLEJUICE IS SO FAR AWAY, how could they even possibly give an illustration like that, that is an absolute lie of illustrations. To light up the night sky with a light the size of our own sun. JEEZ. We are not that close to beetlejuice. WHATEVER.


The claim that it will be the same size as our own sun may be a bit of an exageration, it certainly wouldn't be as bright! It would be very bright though and that would give it the appearance of being very large. But it won't just flicker and die out. When a star went supernova in 1054 it was so bright for a while that it was visible in daylight and that star was 10 times further away from us than Betelgeuse is. That star gradually dimmed and can now be seen as the Crab Nebula which is a very beautiful object.

It is the fate of all stars to explode at the end of their lives, but only the very massive ones go supernova. The Sun doesn't have enough mass to go supernova, Betelguese that has 12 times the mass of the Sun does.
edit on 4/9/11 by Insomniac because: Clarity



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by cloaked4u
 


Do you understand what an absolute magnitude of -12 means?



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 



I don't believe it. SO, then for it to be that large and that bright in the night sky here by earth. beetlejuice when it blows in beetlejuice sky over there, the light must have taken up the whole galaxy there and then some. That is like saying that if our sun went supernova it would light up everything way way past pluto sky's away and then some. What you are saying is that if our own sun goes it will take out everything in it's path including everything way past pluto and then some. I don't think so.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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Originally posted by Drunkenparrot
reply to post by cloaked4u
 


Do you understand what an absolute magnitude of -12 means?




why don't you exsplain it to me for you will anyways.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by cloaked4u
reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 



I don't believe it. SO, then for it to be that large and that bright in the night sky here by earth. beetlejuice when it blows in beetlejuice sky over there, the light must have taken up the whole galaxy there and then some. That is like saying that if our sun went supernova it would light up everything way way past pluto sky's away and then some. What you are saying is that if our own sun goes it will take out everything in it's path including everything way past pluto and then some. I don't think so.



If by galaxy you mean solar system, then yes when it swelled to its red giant phase it probably engulfed its entire solar system if it had one. The Sun cannot go supernova (see my post above). But when it swells prior to going nova it will engulf part of our solar system. The Earth will certainly be swallowed!



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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reply to post by Insomniac
 


thats what i mean. It will engulf the whole thing. Still, even if our sun could go supernova and do this , still is not big enough light to be seen as big as our own sun ESPECIALLY when beetlejuice is so far away. I believe it will have the light signature in the sky as much as if you held out a penny in front of your face at streched arms length and put it in the sky and looked at it. THAT is what i think.


edit on 4-9-2011 by cloaked4u because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 5 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by cloaked4u
 


..Believe what you want.
The picture posted earlier is likely accurate.

It will be a faint light spot in the day, but at night it should light up the sky much brighter than the moon, it will likely appear as an early dusk out for around 3 months. It certainly will not just flicker and go out.. this star is large and very close to us (close in regards to outer space) It will be bright.. pray we get to see it in our lifetimes. It would be amazing.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 12:07 AM
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Was staring at Betelgeuse early this morning approx 0300hrs it was in the east where I live about 7 fists from the horizon at a guess...it was a shimering orange colour , definitely may be getting brighter?

It apears beautiful even without a scope. it will be a brilliant sight if its light comes our way from the supernova soon.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 09:45 AM
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Cloaked4u,

It is very difficult to simulate the appearance of a super bright object that is effectively a point source. The Celestia simulation of this event is the only way that it can be displayed on a computer monitor, because there is a limit to the brightness of individual pixels. When Betelgeuse explodes, the light of a hundred billion stars will be concentrated in a very small region of the sky (only a tiny fraction of the apparent size of the Sun or the Full Moon).

Notice I said "the light of a hundred billion stars". Sounds ridiculous, doesn't it? Except it isn't. Supernovae frequently outshine the entire galaxy in which they reside. That gives you some idea of the colossal amount of energy that is liberated when massive stars explode.

EDIT: Ah, I see what you mean now by the "Huffington Post" comment. You are quite right. The Betelgeuse supernova will look nothing like the "twin suns" illustration that is included in that article. However, it will be brighter than the Full Moon, and therefore easily visible in broad daylight.
edit on 7-9-2011 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 09:19 AM
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reply to post by Mogget
 


Ok then, so if it could be roughly the same size or larger than the moon, Can the Betegleuse supernova have any Earth or environmetal changes come with it.. In reality when you say it would be the same size as the moon, your actually saying that it would roughly look similar to the sun aswell from the way we observe it from Earth.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by Insomniac
 


or as we type these words
and bang there you go




posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 10:12 AM
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Really, if a star did soak us with gamma rays why worry about it? All life would end. No use in worrying about stuff that cannot be prevented or survived



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