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New High: 93% Say They're Paying More for Groceries Than a Year Ago

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posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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New High: 93% Say They're Paying More for Groceries Than a Year Ago


www.rasmussenreports.com

Americans nationwide continue to lose faith in the Federal Reserve Board to keep inflation under control, with the number who say they are paying more for groceries now at an all-time high. ... 93% of adults report paying more for groceries now than they did a year ago, the highest finding to date. Only four percent (4%) say they’re not paying more for groceries now compared to a year ago.
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 17-8-2011 by Partygirl because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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This shouldn't be too much of a surprise; just look at your own bills!

I see shrinking portions and growing price tags...meanwhile my own humble wage remains as it is, making it humbler than ever.

Something has got to break...how much more can we take???

What I want to know is, how are people coping? Where are you getting the money from??? Under the sofa? eBay selling?


www.rasmussenreports.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 16-8-2011 by Partygirl because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:25 PM
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reply to post by Partygirl
 


I'd like to know who is buying groceries for the 4% who are just oblivious to the clear increase in price across the board.

Furthermore, I'd love to do more reading on the the ever shrinking quantities of products sold compared to the increase in prices. Pay more and get less and forces you to head back to the store just a little sooner especially with breakfast cereal. Big box/Same box only with a smaller bag inside.

Ramen Noodles anyone???



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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I'm 37 years old and I remember paying .99 cents for a pound of ground beef. Yesterday I paid 5 bucks for a pound! Unbelievable but it was extra lean. Im middle class wage earner so I do OK but my tax burder is through the roof. I cannot afford to save money and I find it totally frustrating.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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This has been going on long past a year ago, try 5 years ago, 6 even. It’s hidden inflation, raising or even keeping the prices the same but in return receiving smaller portions. All those smaller portions really add up in savings, for the manufacturing.

I work at a retail store that deals with pet food. You can do the math yourself. One certain brand of dog food, when I first started a little more less than 6 years ago, costs $25.99. Each year it went up 0.07%, doesn’t sound like much right? Well today it costs roughly $10.92 cents more. That 40lb $25.99 bag of filler (corn) is now a 35lb bag that costs around $36.99.

I’m annoyed by customers that ask why the prices keep rising. “Have you been under a rock the last 6 years!” I want to scream at them.

You can apply this math with just about anything.

~AMNQ





posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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"93% of adults report paying more for groceries now than they did a year ago"

7% of adults reported being so depressed that they developed anorexia in the last year.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by Partygirl
 


Shrinking porportions for sure! I just bought some Bomb Pops, well now they're called "American Pops." The red, white and blue frozen treat...and my hubby was like, "I remember when these things were bigger than my hand." I said, "Yeah, I know darlin', times are changin'." They have raised prices but I think they've reduced portion sizes more and not raised prices so drastically, so by the time they do, we'll be conditioned for what we get. Although, I must add, do we really need the cookies and treats the size of our hands?



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by Partygirl

This shouldn't be too much of a surprise; just look at your own bills!

I see shrinking portions and growing price tags...meanwhile my own humble wage remains as it is, making it humbler than ever.

Something has got to break...how much more can we take???

What I want to know is, how are people coping? Where are you getting the money from??? Under the sofa? eBay selling?


www.rasmussenreports.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 16-8-2011 by Partygirl because: (no reason given)


Check out your local food shelf...community resources might surprise you and you don't have to be on public assistance for many of them. Just an option. Non-profits are out there, don't be afraid to utilize them.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by queenofsheba
Although, I must add, do we really need the cookies and treats the size of our hands?


No we don't...I actually have no problem with them reducing sizes as I was brought up not to waste food...but if they are going to give us less, lower prices would be nice too!! I know, I know, I'm dreaming...



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by queenofsheba
 


Yep, snow cone truck came by the other day and for three of us it was 12 bucks. No snow cones only corporate commercial ice cream. I was devastated to say the least. Can you remember when the change in the sofa Partygirl mentioned would by you a snow cone?



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:38 PM
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Which is why I started doing BountifulBaskets.org (it's in many states across the USA now). $15 for a LOT of fresh produce. In fact I had to buy a dehydrator and food saver just to prolong the shelf life since my BF and I can't get through it all. There are add ons too. I spent $50 on our first basket and add ons... went to the grocery store to price out what we got - item for item, we would have spent $175 - and thats WITH coupons. So, it's definitely worth it.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:41 PM
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93% said they're paying more for groceries.
4% said they're not paying more for groceries.
3% said, "You have groceries?"



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by Partygirl
 


Not dreaming it used to be required. If my memory serves I think companies used to have to demonstrate they were serving the public good to be granted a charter to operate. People/companies used to change you the cost of materials plus a modest profit for a product or service and now its whatever the market will bear.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:44 PM
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It costs a lot to move food all over the world.

Buy local, grow a garden and cost will go down everywhere.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:45 PM
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reply to post by Partygirl
 


Who cares? Lets be honest. Food shopping is not a real concern....well not for me anyway. I do not care if my food bill is slightly higher now than this time last year.

To put it into perspective, ask the Ethiopians how much their food and grocery bills are?

Point MADE!



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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Invest in some ebay stock.



posted on Aug, 17 2011 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by Six6Six
reply to post by Partygirl
 


Who cares? Lets be honest. Food shopping is not a real concern....well not for me anyway. I do not care if my food bill is slightly higher now than this time last year.


I care. I am down to the wire every pay-check and not a dollar is wasted! Not a penny! The cupbord is BARE.

Yes it is not as bad as in Ethiopia but is that really a good standard to shoot for?



posted on Aug, 17 2011 @ 01:06 AM
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It is going to get a HECK of a lot worse. The Ag Cartel wants a monopoly on food and they are real close to getting it.

Once they have their monopoly, the food is going to be much higher in price and the quality awful. Forget about growing your own because the USDA/FDA will be regulating you just like they do the Dollarite bunnies or the kids with lemonade stands.

In the article Trojan Horse Law: The Food Safety Modernization Act of 2009 a lawyer explains what the Commerce Clause means to home gardeners.

This thread tells you what can be done: www.abovetopsecret.com...

Dr Thornsberry a veterinarian who chairs R-CALF USA’s animal health committee summed up in one paragraph the whole problem with Animal (& veggie) ID.

".....the National Animal Identification System (NAIS) is being forced on their industry. The U.S. signed a World Trade Organization (WTO) treaty and is now submitting to global rules on animal trade established by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The OIE wants the U.S. to accept imports from countries where animal disease problems persist. For example, while the U.S. eradicated Equine Piroplasmosis – a tick-borne protozoal infection, the OIE wants the U.S. to accept imports from countries that have not eradicated this disease. With NAIS, horse movements could be traced from birth to death, thus eliminating the need to disallow high-risk imports because, according to the OIE, the U.S. could manage contagious diseases within its borders.
R-Calf


So that in a nutshell is what we are actually fighting. These Son of Syphilitic Camels want us to tag our CHICKENS so they can bring in animals from who knows where with who knows what diseases and the fact we can "Trace" the animal or the vegetable back to its farm is supposed to convince us that the USDA is "Protecting us" !!!



Here is an example of the corruption we face:

Older Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) agents have been driven out of the USDA and the USDA now aggressively enforces a “do not look, do not tell” policy toward the Ag Cartel.



the agency ordered field staff --
• not to perform E.coli O157:H7 tests on ground beef because the company was
in compliance with Directive 10010.1 and was performing their own
sampling.

• not to classify E. coli O157:H7 on beef trim as an "adulterant" violating
wholesome meat laws.xii

• to allow 16 square inches of fecal contamination on carcasses....

• not to condemn product dropped on the floor because they could not “prove”
the product fell on a pathogen.


• to accept a one percent positive rate for E. coli O157:H7 as “baseline” and
acceptable....


FSIS smashed anyone who challenged its efforts to protect ConAgra from accountability, not just Mr. Munsell. After Mr. Smith took charge of the Munsell dispute from Washington, every official was moved off the job who blew the whistle internally on harassment of MQF, or who sought accountability from ConAgra. The harassment victims ranged from inspectors to supervisory vets. In some instances the agency simply isolated them from the case. Numerous whistleblowers have reported that the Inspector General staff’s primary interest was to attack the critics, while discouraging or only grudgingly accepting evidence of agency misconduct to shield ConAgra. Agency management forced some of the agency’s most seasoned veterinarians out of the government through steady harassment.

This treatment is consistent with a wide ranging phenomenon since new Labor Management chief William Milton purged the long time career staff of that office, who had earned respect over the years even from critics for objective, constructive resolution in retaliation cases. Leaders from professional organizations and unions alike now express no expectation of fair play within the agency personnel system, claiming that the merit system has been replaced with a reign of terror at FSIS. www.whistleblower.org...


The "Safest food system in the world" has been methodically dismantled and replaced with a corporate run "Dog & Pony show" that does nothing to protect the public health.

Government testing labs have closed, Mexican/foreign cattle with TB are found at slaughter and the food borne illness has more than doubled.

The USA exports 700,000 tons of quality beef while importing 1,500,000 tons from countries with: Naegleria fowler, Encephalitis, vesicular stomatitis viruses, Leptospirosis, Trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), and foot and mouth disease. The US imports 2.5 million live cattle from Canada with BSE (now found in USA) and from Mexico with tuberculosis (now found in USA), brucellosis (now found in USA) cattle tick fever, (now found in USA) Trypanosoma cruz,, (now found in USA), Bluetongue (now found in USA), and Vesicular stomatitis.

Texas Animal Health Commission 2009 report

..new disease challenges are emerging. Some are domestic diseases that are increasing in significance. Others are foreign diseases that may be imported as result of the exponential increases in international importations of animals and animal products. Our industries and our economy are threatened by diseases and pests that heretofore we only read about in disease text books... www.tahc.state.tx.us...



posted on Aug, 17 2011 @ 02:47 AM
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Originally posted by queenofsheba
reply to post by Partygirl
 


Shrinking porportions for sure! I just bought some Bomb Pops, well now they're called "American Pops." The red, white and blue frozen treat...and my hubby was like, "I remember when these things were bigger than my hand." I said, "Yeah, I know darlin', times are changin'." They have raised prices but I think they've reduced portion sizes more and not raised prices so drastically, so by the time they do, we'll be conditioned for what we get. Although, I must add, do we really need the cookies and treats the size of our hands?


I used to think that too but maybe your hands were just smaller? It had been years since I ate burger king and the chicken sandwich seemed a lot smaller than when I was a kid.



posted on Aug, 17 2011 @ 04:27 AM
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Originally posted by jibeho
reply to post by Partygirl
 


I'd like to know who is buying groceries for the 4% who are just oblivious to the clear increase in price across the board.

Furthermore, I'd love to do more reading on the the ever shrinking quantities of products sold compared to the increase in prices. Pay more and get less and forces you to head back to the store just a little sooner especially with breakfast cereal. Big box/Same box only with a smaller bag inside.

Ramen Noodles anyone???


I'm one of the four percent, but only because I've started shopping much smarter over the last few years.

Life in the Army means a life on the go. Those tuna lunches are expensive! Now I cook everything, and use my microwave as bread storage. It works so well I use two microwaves for bread storage now!




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