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Worries of Mega-Tsunami! 720 Earthquakes On El Hierro (Canary islands) In One Week!

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posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:39 AM
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A Paradise beach could became the hole of the Hell... "An unprecedented 720 earthquakes have been recorded on El Hierro, the smallest of the Canary Islands, during the past week,” says this article by Mark Dunphy. El Hierro is currently the most volcanically active of the Canary Islands in Atlantic Ocean. El Hierro has the largest number of volcanoes in the Canaries with over 500 open sky cones, another 300 covered by the most recent outflows, and some 70 caves and volcanic galleries, notably the Don Justo cave whose collection of channels surpasses 6km in length.
A swarm of little earthquakes that have triggered a lot of worries and the worst of nightmare.





The National Geographic Institute (IGN) and Volcanological Institute of the Canary Islands is continuing to record scores of earthquakes, measuring between 1 and 3 on the Richter Scale, each day. The majority of earthquakes are being recorded at a depth of between 5km and 15 km.



www.irishweatheronline.com...

In a BBC Horizon program broadcast on 12 Oct 2000, geologists hypothesised that a during a future eruption a similar landslide could potentially generate a “megatsunami” some 2000-3000 ft (650–900 m) high in the region of the islands. The huge wave would radiate out across the Atlantic and inundate the eastern seaboard of North America including the American, Caribbean and northern coasts of South America a mere six to eight hours later.
According to modeling estimates, the tsunami’s waves could possibly reach 160 ft (49 m) or more high and, depending on topography, could extend up to 16 miles (25 km) inland, causing massive devastation along the coastlines.

www.myweathertech.com...

The volcanic activity, principally at the convergence of the three ridges, resulted in the continual expansion of the island. A mere 50,000 years ago, as a result of seismic tremors which produced massive landslides, a giant piece of the island cracked off, crashed down into the ocean and scattered along the seabed.

www.elhierro.com...
edit on 3-8-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:54 AM
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Nuke the island?



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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Originally posted by BrianC
Nuke the island?


You are joking?
What is, exactly, your point of view BrainC?



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by BrianC
Nuke the island?



I think your watching to many American movies, Where nukes always save the world..

Nice thread arken, you are correct, this island poses are real danger, especially to the uk. A tsunami generated there would devastate the south coast if England. (among other places)
edit on 3/8/11 by Misterlondon because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:08 AM
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reply to post by Misterlondon
 


Thanks, Misterlondon.
I'm very impressed on how a "little" landslide into the ocean can trigger a so powerful tsunami....
How fragile we are.......



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:11 AM
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That is very concerning. I saw that show you mentioned about mega tsunamis and how if there was a mega tsunami generated in the canary islands, it could devastate the U.S. east coast. Obviously nuking the island would only make things worse. Hope that was a joke. If a mega tsunami hit the east coast it would be terrible. So many population centers right on the water. New York City for one.
edit on 3-8-2011 by dave0davidson because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:16 AM
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reply to post by dave0davidson
 




That is very concerning. I saw that show about mega tusnamis and how if there were a landslide on that island it would devastate the U.S. east coast.


The concern is the island of Cumbre Vieja. El Hierro is not Cumbre Vieja and that statement is far too definitive. The theory is far from being accepted.

Whether or not Cumbre Vieja will indeed one day collapse into the Atlantic and generate a mega-tsunami remains a point of heated argument between geologists. The recent spate of earthquakes in the Canary Islands have largely affected tiny El Hierro, and while the number recorded there is considered ‘unprecedented,’ nobody is suggesting the temblors are leading up to something larger. As with so many issues surrounding seismology and volcanology, more research and analysis is required.

www.quakecasts.com...

The situation is being discussed.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 8/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:39 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


From the same link you posted, Phage:
www.quakecasts.com...

According to geologist Bill McGuire, a Benfield professor of geophysical hazards at University of College of London, it is only a matter of time before Cumbre Vieja erupts and sheds a good portion of it and its surrounding territory into the Atlantic deep. That we’re talking about a slab of mantle the size of a small island means the resulting displacement of water could send a wall of water hundreds of feet tall crashing across the Canary Islands and similar devastation to the nearby African coast. The Americas and portions of Europe would have to wait several hours for the resulting mega-tsunamis to strike them.

“Eventually the whole rock will collapse into the water and the collapse will devastate the Atlantic margin,” says McGuire. “We need to be out there looking at when an eruption is likely to happen, otherwise there will be no time to evacuate major cities.” Such a global geophysical event or “gee gee” as some have come to call them, represents a magnitude of disaster unknown to modern humans.


Not "IF", but "WHEN".....



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:41 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 

Yes. According to McGuire.
But many disagree with McGuire. As I said, it is far from accepted.

There are more than a few scientists who vehemently disagree with McGuire’s assessment, arguing that Cumbre Vieja’s host island of La Palma is quite stable and is home to a number of natural obstacles that would impede if not entirely stop any massive landslide from occurring. Furthermore, they have created computer models of their own that don’t jibe with the doomsday scenarios put forth by McGuire and his compatriots. The volcano would need to be appreciably taller, they argue, and even then the forces at work could not create the energies described by McGuire.

www.quakecasts.com...

And again, it is not Cumbre Vieja which is experiencing the earthquakes.
edit on 8/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:51 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


"Tricks" with words don't help. The geology, in this sensitive matter, need analysys and surveillance, before a possible huge disaster. Don't you think? Monitoring the situation on that sensitive location is HERETIC?

McGuire and a group of like-minded geologists... urge nations situated along the Atlantic to actively monitor the Canary Islands, because such surveillance could provide days of warning (versus just the hours that our existing Atlantic-based buoy system would deliver).




The theory is far from being accepted.


Far from WHO?
edit on 3-8-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 02:55 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 

It is being monitored. There is no indication of an eruption.
earthquake-report.com...

But the earthquakes are occurring at a different volcano than the one McQuire thinks can cause a megatsunami. A volcano 50 miles away from the one McQuire thinks can cause a megatsunami.


edit on 8/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:02 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Arken
 

It is being monitored. There is no indication of an eruption.
earthquake-report.com...

But the earthquakes are occurring at a different volcano than the one McQuire thinks can cause a megatsunami. A volcano 50 miles away from the one McQuire thinks can cause a megatsunami.


edit on 8/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


So, there is only a difference of 50 miles..... but the result devastating scenario could be the same?


However the "volcano" cited from all the sources is HIERRO.


edit on 3-8-2011 by Arken because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:04 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 

Why?

Does McQuire think that El Hierro can produce a megatsunami? Does any geologist?
I know you do but you see disasters behind every corner.

edit on 8/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:08 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Arken
 

Why?

Does McQuire think that El Hierro can produce a megatsunami? Does any geologist?
I know you do but you see disasters behind every corner.

edit on 8/3/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


No. I don't. I think that prevention is better than cure!



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:10 AM
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They have only a few possibilities,
a controlled Outflow (?)
or a Methane Stabilisation inside of than flank!

Is the amount of Mass really that big to introduce a big Tsunami?
Because when the flow is slowly and steady the Water get enough Time to expand!



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:14 AM
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posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


We have had a couple of threads on this topic in specific.

Here it is, he posted this before i did.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Here is the thread I made.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 3-8-2011 by ElectricUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:48 AM
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Good thread + interesting discussion . For my part I dont think that all those earthquakes at only 50 miles away is far enough away from the site of the overhang to consider that a 'safe' distance. We now know there is significant activity in the area > and we can now be safer than more sorry like some. I'd also point out most geologists would recognise the 'conectedness' of the island 'chain'.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 03:58 AM
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The black and white image is quite disturbing. Does anyone else think that the island may be the southern edge of an enormous caldera. The edge is almost perfectly circular like what would be seen in a crater or well formed caldera, only enormous.



posted on Aug, 3 2011 @ 04:11 AM
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I really don't understand how this works. but perspective of it's size makes it hard to believe mega-tsunamis could come from such a small island. wouldn't the initial "kerplunk" send most of the energy up over the top of the ocean and locally?? I always thought the big tsunamis are caused from underwater quakes that displace massive amounts of water.




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