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Brain Dead Cops Taser Dog Twice Just For The Hell Of It

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posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by Ferris.Bueller.II
 


all these pictures come from goggle images, note head shape.
pay close attention to the second picture.

pit bulldog, i found this picture that is better than the first, it shows a white pit. so i edited it.




amercain bulldog



bulldog



boxers



now if you look at the 2nd and 4th picture, tell me what you see. to me these look more like the dog in the video.
also i forgot to add that pits have a more pink or reddish nose. the dog in the video seems to have a black nose.




edit on 3-7-2011 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:26 AM
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Originally posted by hounddoghowlie

now this dog in the video, does not appear to be much more than a puppy, in fact around the 1:07 mark you hear some one call him a puppy. and if you watch the dog closely from 19 seconds up to 1:07 mark, and know any thing about dogs, you see a animal that is timid and scared, you see him bark into air as to say go away, and not at some one, looking around for help looking more than likely for his human, you can also see his tail wagging, a wagging tail is not aggressive behavior, you never hear him growl at any one, and the only time you see him bark directly at any body, he tucks his nub and runs off. in fact most of the behavior you see is retreating, the only time you might questionable action is when the cop gets a little to close when he is on the sidewalk. and if you watch right before he is hit with the tazer, he is smelling something with his tail tucked.


Which makes him MORE dangerous than a dominant or confident dog. A dominant or confident canine will bite however once there is submission the dog will stop as it has "won" and made it's point that it is alpha, or that patch of grass is his. A nervous, weak nerved dog like this one will continue to bite. You will also see the dog regain it's feet and lunge at the animal control officer, and it looks like the catch pole slips (can't be positive) which would justify the second Tasing.


Originally posted by hounddoghowlie
also animal control should have used a tranq dart, and not some cop that has only something that causes pain or kill him.


Other than the fact that tranquilizers are not issued to animal control officers but to veterinarians attached to animal control...

You do realize that ANY tranquilizer is a sedative and has a potential to kill the target animal- a potential great enough that when used on wild animals there is stimulant on hand to immediately counteract it if necessary. There is also the possibility of the hypo piercing the pericardial sac, causing a pneumothorax or nicking open a major blood vessel as well as clot formation and stroke.

If you were so concerned for the dog's safety why expose him to the very real possibility of death when there is a MUCH less risky alternative?



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


I wish that it was as part of their training
to be tasered themselves.I wish that the
taser had never been invented.The police
overuse that particular tool of their trade.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by mamabeth
 



I wish that it was as part of their training to be tasered themselves.

That is a part of their training.






posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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Originally posted by mamabeth
reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


I wish that it was as part of their training
to be tasered themselves.I wish that the
taser had never been invented.The police
overuse that particular tool of their trade.


You wish actually has been granted from day 1.

Officers are required to be Tasered as well as be exposed to any/all chemical agents at their disposal (typically OC) in the same concentration and formulation as they are issued prior to carriage.

Wishes really do come true!!!!



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by Rockdisjoint
 


I am glad it is part of their training.
Thank-you for bringing this to my
attention.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by Ferris.Bueller.II
 


It wasn't acting the least bit "defensive" (though you probably meant aggressive).
Barking is not a dog being aggressive. I actually thought it looked pretty tamed.
edit on 3-7-2011 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


I'd suggest watching the video again.

Pay special attention to the segment between 1:13 and 1:20 where the animal charges the officer from the curb with shoulders lowered, ears put back and direct eye contact being made.

That is the very definition of an agitated (and now dangerous) canine.

Just wondering why the OP decided this was a cop story and not a dog owner story. Wouldn't the more correct title be "Irresponsible Dog Owner Causes Dog to be Tased" considering the first harmful event is allowing the dog to run at large and the most harmful event is allowing the dog to run at large. I could see the title staying as-is if the officer decided to Tase a dog who was in an enclosed yard or tied on a lead but this was not the case...
edit on 3-7-2011 by SFA437 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


Even though pit bulls are not my favorite breed (mostly because oof what type of owners are drawn to these dogs) this could have been handled more humainly. If they could hit the dog with a tazer they sure as heck could have used a capture stick easier.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Meh, gross. I wonder how many lines of work there are in which people have to deal with dogs barking at them? A lot I imagine.... If these cops can't handle THAT..... They need to get out of any profession in which a dog barks at them.


What is really sad is I am sitting here thinking " Well, at least the dog didn't get shot." That to me is a sign that this is becoming way to common place.



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by SFA437

Which makes him MORE dangerous than a dominant or confident dog. A dominant or confident canine will bite however once there is submission the dog will stop as it has "won" and made it's point that it is alpha, or that patch of grass is his. A nervous, weak nerved dog like this one will continue to bite. You will also see the dog regain it's feet and lunge at the animal control officer, and it looks like the catch pole slips (can't be positive) which would justify the second Tasing.


yes you are right, but this dog showed no tale tale signs of fearful aggression,other than when the cop got to close.
a good explanation of fearful body language, from ask.com


Fearful The fearful dog combines submissive and anxious attitudes with more extreme signals. She stands tense, but is very low to the ground. Her ears are flat back and her eyes are narrowed and averted. Her tail is between her legs and she typically trembles. A fearful dog often whines or growls and might even bare her teeth in defense. She may also urinate or defecate. A fearful dog can turn aggressive quickly if she senses a threat. Do not try to reassure the anxious dog, but remove yourself from the situation calmly. If you are the owner, be confident and strong, but do not comfort or punish your dog. Try to move her to a less threatening, more familiar location.


in fact he mostly showed sign of trying to leave, also tale was wagging more than being tucked in



Other than the fact that tranquilizers are not issued to animal control officers but to veterinarians attached to animal control...


wrong, it depends on local laws, these can vary from, town to town, state to state, or community to community.
see this from the job application for animal control officer in ocean city, nj.


Uses nets, traps, or tranquilizer gun in the capturing of wild animals or strayed domesticated pets.


heres the link for app,

Animal Control Officer




You do realize that ANY tranquilizer is a sedative and has a potential to kill the target animal- a potential great enough that when used on wild animals there is stimulant on hand to immediately counteract it if necessary. There is also the possibility of the hypo piercing the pericardial sac, causing a pneumothorax or nicking open a major blood vessel as well as clot formation and stroke.


yes i do, and you do realize that 50,000 volts even at mili amps can cause heart failure. the heart is a muscle is not and doesn't a taser cause muscle contraction, there have been instances where full grown people have died after use of a taser.

see here the wiki, look at section 9.



While their intended purpose is to circumvent the use of lethal force such as guns, the actual deployment of Tasers by police in the years since Tasers came into widespread use is claimed to have resulted in more than 180 deaths as of 2006


link:Taser Safety Issues




and it looks like the catch pole slips (can't be positive) which would justify the second Tasing.


if you watch around the 2:39 to 2:46 mark it is clear to see the catch did not slip, so no reason to hit him a second time with it.
and i know that if some shot me in my ass with 50,000 volts, i'd try to bite them to.




If you were so concerned for the dog's safety why expose him to the very real possibility of death when there is a MUCH less risky alternative?


the dog probably just got out, which happens all the time to people. i know that i have had to chase mine a few time. because they jumped the fence or sneaked out a door when open. little bastards can be fast like lighting.
if you listen to near the end you can hear the cop tell them the owner is coming, they were probably looking for the dog all ready. i say this because the dog appears to be well care for.
edit on 3-7-2011 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 3 2011 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by hounddoghowlie
 


I am going to disagree with the dog not showing any signs of aggression until approached. Unless that dog was specifically trained for protective work, barking at people is not the reaction that dog should have had. The dog's default should be either overt friendliness or quiet aloofness. Barking at strangers is a sign of a nervous and scared canine.

As for the NJ Animal Control... damn! In my county the darts had to be loaded by a veterinarian and could only be administered by the vet or by an animal control officer specifically trained in the usage and employment of the darts. I'd have figured the northeast would be even more strict than down in NC. Learn something new every day


As for Tasers: I agree that they are not non-lethal but less than lethal however you cite 180 deaths in 5 years which amounts to 36 deaths per year. Since inception the Taser has contributed to 334 deaths (about double what you've cited). Out of those cases there have been other contributing factors of which the most common is drug intoxication with coc aine being the primary and methamphetamine being the secondary in representation. IIRC the Taser has caused 53 deaths where no contributing factor has been defined.

The death rate from perioperative and postoperative effects of anesthesia (in a controlled and monitored environment with lifesaving medical equipment at hand) is 1 in 6,795.

I think we're at 6 of one and a half dozen of the other


As for a dog just getting out- mine does that as well. He also stops at the property line and will not cross it, for whatever reason, without his "free" command. Failure to properly train, control and/or confine the dog is just that... owner/handler failure. If the owner had properly trained his canine this video would not exist.



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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Are you people serious? This dog was obviously restrained and subdued with the first shot, and the neck choker...
Yeah, the owners fail.
Yeah the dog WAS being aggressive *First taser seemed to put and end to that quit quick*
The second shot was uncalled for.

To cause unnecessary harm to any living creature shows a very disturbed side to you.
edit on 4-7-2011 by SalientSkivvy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by hounddoghowlie
 



50000 volts can not stop a heart. The average static electric shock is 100000 to 120000 volts... You must fear walking on carpet like its the hire wire over the grand canyon. Try talking to people in the know before you post "facts".



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:01 PM
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Originally posted by Ferris.Bueller.IIYou've had both pitbulls and bulldogs, and misidentified one breed for the other?


Actually for a layman it is rather hard to tell the difference between American bulldog and pit bull - I am guessing when the poster used bulldog without the American qualifier he was just being brief. I doubt he meant the English bulldog.

Difference Between American bulldog and Pit bull


American bulldog vs Pit bull - American bulldog and pit bull are sometimes referred to as the same dog breed. Both the breeds belong to Molosser family and have somewhat the same characteristics. However, when closely watching these two breeds, one can come across many differences between the two.


The two look a lot alike unless you are a show judge or breeder.

edit on 4/7/2011 by Golf66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:08 PM
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Originally posted by SFA437

Originally posted by mamabeth
reply to post by MIDNIGHTSUN
 


I wish that it was as part of their training
to be tasered themselves.I wish that the
taser had never been invented.The police
overuse that particular tool of their trade.


You wish actually has been granted from day 1.

Officers are required to be Tasered as well as be exposed to any/all chemical agents at their disposal (typically OC) in the same concentration and formulation as they are issued prior to carriage.

Wishes really do come true!!!!


Yes, just like interrogators and those who train resistance techniques are water boarded and subjected to all the deprivation methods and manipulation techniques they will apply.

I know I have been water boarded more than all the douche bag Al-Qaeda captives combined - there is no executive order required to water board an operator in training nor an instructor at a course. Just their volunteer waiver.

Same applies to any concussion grenades, choke holds, take downs and pressure points - you get to suffer them before you can use them on anyone.

It’s uncomfortable and sometimes disoreinting but you are in no real physical danger.

edit on 4/7/2011 by Golf66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by mamabeth
 


I think the fact they experience this as part of their training is good. I do wonder if it makes them a tad more "trigger happy", due to their personal familiarity of what occurrs when tased / sprayed.

"I've had it done to me, now you can have a dose, Mr Citizen"...



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:38 PM
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The second tazing was excessive. Once you have the choker on, it's pretty much over.


So, yes, cruelty indeed.



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:49 PM
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And for those of you who claim it's okay because the dog lived, and no one was hurt....


No, it's not okay. We're going to scrutinize every **POTENTIAL** injustice and find out if corruption is being commited. Obviously the legal system isn't used for that, but we are independant reporters who go where the MSM won't go and will report on atrocities and injustices to help shed light on our corrupt system that is long overdue for a make over.



posted on Jul, 4 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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Well UK animal control officers seem to just about get by without tasers or guns so the argument "would you rather they shot it" it completely facile

Once the dog was on the ground and had a collar round it what threat did it pose exactly?



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