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Every star in the sky is twinkling... hard

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posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:45 AM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


Dude I don't know about you but these stars are twinkling haaarrrrrrd




posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:47 AM
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reply to post by AnotherYOU
 

Ah. I was hasty. Interesting idea.

I can't see it having much of an effect on the lower atmosphere and there isn't much material in the ionosphere to refract light but I can't say no.

edit on 5/29/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:49 AM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 

You poor thing.
Listen to Hendrix. That'll fix it.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:52 AM
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Fast moving clouds here in the heart of Texas.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:57 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


solar winds are considerably high right now, without the geomagnetic field the solar winds would literally blow away our atmosphere, so its not just a strech of the imagination for me to conceive that the interaction between both could result in the phenomenon reported by the op.

a thining or stretching of the atmosphere by the magnetic field would directly impact our view of space.

since the atmosphere acts as a sort of lens. and the geomagnetic field is what keeps the atmosphere in place.

if im right, let's just hope the magnetic field stays up and we dont get to see the stars TOO well



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 02:20 AM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


twinkle twinkle little star how i wonder what you are



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 02:32 AM
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reply to post by AnotherYOU
 

The gross distortion of the magnetosphere by the solar wind occurs far beyond the limits of the atmosphere. By the time you get to the ionosphere the Earth's field is too strong to be affected much.

Scintillation is caused by small disturbances of the atmosphere. When the apparent size of the disturbance is greater than the apparent size of the object being view we get the twinkling effect. That is why planets are rarely seen to twinkle, they are too big. Any overall "stretching" of the atmosphere would not affect scintillation. What I can't entirely rule out is turbulence is the possibility of turbulence in the ionosphere caused by a geomagnetic storm. But again, there isn't much there to refract light. It's pretty close to a vacuum.

The atmosphere does not really act as a lens, except maybe in the case of mirage like effects in the lower atmosphere.

Well, if we lost the magnetosphere, over a few million or billion years the solar wind might blow away our atmosphere. After all, Mars still has some left.

edit on 5/29/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 5/29/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 02:42 AM
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edit on 29-5-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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Every star in the sky is twinkling.....hard
as if the heavens themselves are alight
your eyes seem to glow, a mirrored prism rainbow
I gaze transfixed at this beautiful....sight


I'm a romantic at heart, I couldn't resist




posted on May, 29 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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dude i know wut you mean, i live in alexandria va, like 10 minz from dc and they are twinkling alot more then usuall, and belive it or not ive been see'n crazy things in the sky at night. it will look like a plane the light are normal then they get bigger and bigger then dim down then everything goes black. Ive seen this like 5 times now almost every night.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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No disrespect OP, but I laughed out loud when I read about the stars "twinkling FEROCIOUSLY"
I don't think I have ever heard those two words used together before.
But yes, I have noticed this....it's the atmosphere. Regardless, it's beautiful isn't it?
edit on 5/29/2011 by StealthyKat because: oops



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by havenvideo
Not sure what to make of it. Usually I see one or two twinkling stars in the sky, but tonight it's EVERY SINGLE STAR, and they are twinking most ferociously towards the SE, harder than I've ever seen in my life, about 10x harder than a normal twinkle.

I'm located in SE VA, near the border of NC next to the Atlantic.

Unfortunately I don't have a camera that can capture the night sky at all, but hopefully someone else can look out and see what I see. My girlfriend saw it too so I know it's not just me.

Anyone else seeing this? Any ideas on what is causing this?

A nice clear night with less light pollution than normal!



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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For me it would be,

"As I was twinkling, I noticed the stars"

Be careful where you Twinkle!



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


Looks normal to me...but then again I live in a big city.
Wish I could see a ton of stars twinkling.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


I'm in London I've been noticing this for a while we don't have to have many stars so it's easy to pick out the same ones every clear night,it's been steadily one after the other highly visible twinkling.This was Friday night.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by Taupin Desciple
 


Strong work, Disciple of Taupin.




posted on May, 29 2011 @ 07:50 PM
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I think the title is nice.

I have seen less stars in the sky.
and less twinkling.
I blame chem trails.
and othere things that are in the sky.
when I was a kid. "oh god did I say that!"
I could see lots of twinkling.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


Please define the normal twinkling that happens to be 10x greater tonight so we can make an informed reply.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by buddha
 


I blame it on local overcast tonight, that I cannot see any stars whatsoever, and mostly because it is not yet dark out, and I live in a city. But go a. with your hypothesis if it happens to make you feel better about something or another, by all means, (just don't try to get a science job with that on your resume).



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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reply to post by Nickbeezy26
 


I think me and you have been seeing the same thing, here in NZ i tend to go outside at night and check out the stars and out of nowhere a big bright light comes out of nowhere like a .light of a plane then started dimming then just disappear no noise at all, happen to me about 3 times now


I do agree with OP the stars and alot brighter down here as well. Could be our atmosphere is thinning up???



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