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Every star in the sky is twinkling... hard

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posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:09 AM
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Not sure what to make of it. Usually I see one or two twinkling stars in the sky, but tonight it's EVERY SINGLE STAR, and they are twinking most ferociously towards the SE, harder than I've ever seen in my life, about 10x harder than a normal twinkle.

I'm located in SE VA, near the border of NC next to the Atlantic.

Unfortunately I don't have a camera that can capture the night sky at all, but hopefully someone else can look out and see what I see. My girlfriend saw it too so I know it's not just me.

Anyone else seeing this? Any ideas on what is causing this?




posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:12 AM
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Not sure about all the stars, but I do know that the International Space Station and the US Space Shuttle will be easily seen in the sky of the Eastern US and parts of Canada, as they separate, you'll be able to see both at once, and quite bright. Much brighter than Sirius.
edit on 29-5-2011 by TheArchaeologist because: spelling

edit on 29-5-2011 by TheArchaeologist because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:14 AM
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Im seeing a whole lot of very bright stars as well alot more then ussual to be honest.Im from Deltona Fl and normaly on a clear night i see maybe 5~6 stars if that.Its 2:13 am atm and im counting about 22 nice bright ones while i type this.Anyone else seeing this?
edit on 29-5-2011 by mike49121 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:16 AM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


How often do you stargaze?
Could simply be a very clear night.


Enjoy.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:18 AM
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yes, i have noticed that regardless all the light polution in my area stars are looking brighter and twinkle/flicker alot more than they used to.

though i assume whatever it is, its likely due to some change in our atmosphere and not on the stars themselves.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 
Im not a professional star gazer by any means but were im located we never have more then 6 stars at a time were i can see and im seeing about 22 atm.Ive lived in this same house for 21 years and ive never seen the sky this full and bright.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:22 AM
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Speaking of light pollution, I hope nobody sees your avatar before going outside.
I know the darkness scale says you'd need to go to England to find the purest darkness, but I've been in the Mountains of North Carolina at night, in areas without people, and it gave new meaning to pitch black, at least for me, and I've spent a lot of time in the wilderness.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:22 AM
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According to the soho app on my phone were supposed to get hit by a solar storm on may28th.maybe the geomagnetic storm we experience as we pass through it is the causes that effect? i wonder if any ones seeing auras



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:23 AM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 





Every star in the sky is twinkling... hard




Dude, that is the single best title for a thread in forever.

You 'oughta fatten that up and take it to the poetry jam.

edit on 29-5-2011 by Frater210 because: Bloop



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:25 AM
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reply to post by AnotherYOU
 

You are correct. Twinkling (the technical term is scintillation) is caused by turbulence in the atmosphere.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by Frater210
 

How about this?

Every star tonight is twinkling



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:26 AM
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No twinkling here in SW VA.
But it might have something to do with it being cloudy outside.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:27 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by havenvideo
 


How often do you stargaze?
Could simply be a very clear night.


Enjoy.
A few times a week, usually when conditions are like they are right now. Light pollution is as it usually is.

I'm thinking something must be messing with the atmosphere.
edit on 29-5-2011 by havenvideo because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I changed it, Phage. It is now, 'fatten'.

Can you add a line?

C'mon, Phage. Hang out.

Getting you on a thread is like pulling a really cool and powerful card in Pokemon.

Can Scientists be poets?


edit on 29-5-2011 by Frater210 because: Phage!



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:28 AM
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reply to post by havenvideo
 


How would one determine the hardness of a twinkle?

On a scale of 1 - off the chain.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


yes i knew that thank you, still in ats its best to just assume than state as fact.

still, any validation to say this can be due to the current conditions of the magnetic field?
not that we can see the magnetic field, but to say its twisting even more the lens we see the universe through

solar x-rays are active, we have a geomagnetic storm and a mid latitudes aurora

i did start to notice this around the time cycle 24 kicked in, and i do live in a massivelly light polluted area, it's hard not to notice when stars suddently become more visible.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by AnotherYOU
 

Nope.
Light isn't affected by geomagnetism.

Every star tonight is twinkling
Hard.
Lights in the north are whispering
Soft.

edit on 5/29/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)


edit on 5/29/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:43 AM
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Every star tonight is twinkling...... Hard.

Lights in the North are whispering Soft.

Why do they cast this retinal glare?

Which draws my gaze to realms aloft.



Fine work, Doctore.

I think we are getting Lovecraftian here...

Phage? Anyone else?
edit on 29-5-2011 by Frater210 because: N.



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


im not saying the permeability of light is affected by geomagnetism.

im saying a geomagnetic storm has an effect in our atmosphere that results in the subsequent refraction of light.

well, im mostly asking.

not as a direct cause but a side effect



posted on May, 29 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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For the record I titled this thread that way because I have a god damned kesha song stuck in my .... hard



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