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The nearly Disaster-Proof Home

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posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:00 AM
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I quickly mentioned this in another post, but thought I'd make a new post for anyone who may have never heard of these homes before.

The Monolithic Dome is something my husband and I have been thinking about for years. They claim to be nearly hurricane proof, tornado proof, fire proof, earthquake proof, and even somewhat bullet proof. It's all in the design and the materials. If anyone is thinking about moving, building or buying a new home, look at these first. They are also great on energy. The biggest downfall is that most people thing they are ugly. But I think it's pretty sad that your home's appearance is more important than how safe it can keep you. I for one think they are not ugly. I love the way they look!




Peace of Mind You can feel it in a Monolithic Dome during a storm. You quickly realize you might lose the dog house, the trampoline, the carport and even the porch, but at least the dome you are in will survive. It’s also comforting to know that you don’t have to stay up all night watching television to make sure the tornado watch is cancelled. You can go to bed. The risk is definitely minimized within a Monolithic Dome. Each person must decide what is an acceptable risk. In the past, conventional construction did not offer much in the way of tornado protection, except for building an expensive separate structure as a shelter. But a Monolithic Dome provides near-absolute protection, in most cases, without spending any extra money. In fact, in the long run, the dome’s energy efficiency will save you more.


I'm the one in my house who does stay up all night if there is a tornado watch, i would love to have this kind of peace of mind.





Whether it’s your home, your children’s school or some other structure that you and your loved ones spend time in, nothing beats knowing that you’re in a place that cannot be destroyed by most natural or manmade disasters. That’s the confidence Monolithic Domes offer. They meet or exceed FEMA’s standards for providing near-absolute protection. Monolithic Domes are proven survivors of tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and fires.


This should be the new standard for building. Think how many lives would be sparred and how much money would be saved just this year alone if all the structures in america were made of these.









Proven ability to survive earthquakes, most man-made disasters, fire, termites and rot. Cost-efficient, earth-friendly, extremely durable and easily maintained. Super energy efficient. Can be constructed on virtually any site: in the mountains, on beaches, even underground or underwater (wow!).


Underwater? Wow, can you imagine building your home under water! Flood coming? No problem!

www.monolithic.com...









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edit on 23-5-2011 by Under Water because: added pics

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posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:14 AM
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I wonder what something like that would cost, and if it would alter the amount you pay into an insurance policy?

That being said; I've seen tornadoes peel the asphalt off of interstates, and pull tornado bunkers out of the ground, I don't think this would fair any better. As far as underwater goes... seems like PETA would be called everytime you put the dog out on the line.


Sorry.

You have to wonder about the structural integrity of these homes though. It isn't the water that hurts you during a tsunami, its the thousands of cars, trees, boulders, and pieces of homes pounding your house like a never ending siege that gets you.
edit on 23-5-2011 by Mactire because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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You have to wonder about the structural integrity of these homes though. It isn't the water that hurts you during a tsunami, its the thousands of cars, trees, boulders, and pieces of homes pounding your house like a never ending siege that gets you.
it's all in the shape... the dome shape acts as a shield, it repels impact better than a strait wall. Winds and debris just sort of roll around it. They even repel bullets!



The Monolithic Dome has a number of unique benefits: construction affordability, healthy environment, disaster protection, energy savings, longevity, just to name a few.


They are supposed to be safer, more cost efficient, and more green than traditional buildings.

Monolithic Dome Benefits: Green Buildings People admire Monolithic Domes for many different reasons. Some like their graceful, curved lines. Others admire their open, clear-span interiors. Still others become fascinated with the technical aspects of Monolithic Dome construction. But besides those characteristics, the Monolithic Dome offers another that is vitally important today because it has to do with our environment. Monolithic Domes are green buildings – they are considered among the greenest of today’s building alternatives.



Monolithic Dome Benefits: Energy The Monolithic Dome is a micro-energy user. It needs a minimum of energy to maintain a comfortable interior, usually one fourth of that used by other types of structures. In fact, it takes less energy to heat or cool a Monolithic Dome than it does to heat or cool a super-insulated metal building or a conventional house blanketed in an airtight wrap.



Monolithic Dome Benefits: Strength The Monolithic Dome has strength that produces longevity. Its lifespan is measured in centuries, not years. In fact, right now, we don’t know just how many centuries a Monolithic Dome will last. But we do know that it is a structure that can be designed and constructed to be passed down to and used by generations. Easy maintenance complements the dome’s longevity. In other words, a Monolithic Dome cannot only last for centuries, it can last beautifully just with easy care.


I for one would feel much safer in one of these domes than any other structure. I hope one day we can afford to build one. They even teach courses on how to build these homes for those who want to build their own, or want to start a business in their area building these. Maybe I'm just crazy, but i can't understand why people aren't flocking to these, especially with all the increased activity in storms and natural disasters.











edit on 23-5-2011 by Under Water because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:25 AM
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these are so cool! great find and thanks for your thread,,, ha i want one .



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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I myself am looking to relocate soon down to the
Caribbean...
The part of the Island I'd be living on
see's its fair share of Hurrican's
The Local construction methods are already those of
Build everything out of concrete...

So I had consider curved walls & domed roofs to allow
Less wind resistance ....

I like the look of the domed places in the OP


just don't think I can afford the price



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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I wonder what something like that would cost, and if it would alter the amount you pay into an insurance policy?



Note: We first published this article in our Spring 2000 Roundup. Quoted dollar amounts are from that time period. A significant reduction Can the annual premium for homeowners insurance on the same Monolithic Dome structure for the same coverage drop from $800 to $174? “Sure can, and did,” says Don Tuttle, who, with wife Shirley, built a Monolithic Dome home in Shamrock, Texas just a little over a year ago.


Their website is so huge it will probably answer any questions you can think of. They have a search function on it so i was able to find the answer to that in one click.


Insurance Rates: Shop until they drop!


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posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:29 AM
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these are simular to the ones they make here in south wales uk.
concrete canvas its called..... but you only need to inflate it then spray on water and your done.
and its bulletproof and fireproof etc
www.concretecanvas.co.uk...



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by welshbeliever
 


Interesting, but hard to imagine something like that replacing your home. The monolithics are made to be just as comfortable as a normal home or business.

Check out these interior/exterior pictures of a home in Wisconsin.
www.monolithic.com...

They are beautiful, and strong!


Monolithic Domes are constructed following a method that requires a tough, inflatable Airform, steel-reinforced concrete and a polyurethane foam insulation. Each of these ingredients is used in a technologically specific way.

Our domes can be designed to fit any architectural need: homes, cabins, churches, schools, gymnasiums, arenas and stadiums, bulk storages, landlord dwellings and various other privately or publicly owned facilities.

Monolithic Domes meet FEMA standards for providing near-absolute protection and have a proven ability to survive tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, most manmade disasters, fire, termites and rot.

They are cost-efficient, earth-friendly, extremely durable and easily maintained. Most importantly, a Monolithic Dome uses about 50% less energy for heating and cooling than a same-size, conventionally constructed building.

Beginning in 1970, Monolithic Domes have been built and are in use in virtually every American state and in Canada, Mexico, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia.

Monolithic Domes are neither restricted by climate nor by site location. In terms of energy consumption, durability, disaster resistance and maintenance, Monolithic Domes perform well in any climate, even extremely hot or cold ones. And they can be constructed on virtually any site: in the mountains, on beaches, even underground or underwater.




edit on 23-5-2011 by Under Water because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-5-2011 by Under Water because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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true.
these are more for temp shelter but still cool though

www.youtube.com...



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:39 AM
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Originally posted by welshbeliever
true.
these are more for temp shelter but still cool though

www.youtube.com...


Yeah, they can be a temp option until your comfortably living in a dome. I bet they make great shed too. Would be nice not to loose our shed and belongings to a hurricane.



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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If it'll survive this, windows, doors, and integrity intact, it'll get my vote.



edit on 23-5-2011 by Mactire because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by Mactire
 



The NOAA wanted to know if a Monolithic Dome could be built that would survive a 100 foot tsunami. My answer was an absolute Yes with this provision: a rock that I could anchor the dome to. The rock would have to prevent the uplift created by the water flowing over the dome to pop the dome to the water's surface. Water over the top of a Monolithic Dome turns that dome into an upside-down boat that will struggle to pop to the surface. So, for this situation, the dome must be anchored. But if the water gets indside the dome, the pressure is equalized, and the water's lifting capacity is lost. Obviously, Monolithic Domes can be designed and built to withstand the wind surge of a tornado or hurricane, as well as the water surge of a hurricane or tsunami. But when gross amounts of water are involved, protection from that water must be carefully considered and implemented.


Will it withstand a Tsunami? A Tsunami is a vicious, wicked thing. The Ecoshell in terms of weight is fairly light. If water is moving very fast and very deep it will probably slide and/or lift the Ecoshell. We can tell you however, that of all the buildings left after a Tsunami goes through, the Ecoshell will be standing in the forefront. It is tougher. It is stronger. It will take the pressure better than any conventional concrete block building. The water will tend to move around it. It's only draw back is that it might not weigh enough to stay grounded. If the water is too deep it may tend to pick it up and move it.



again, just read the site... use the search feature they have. it will answer all your questions.
do you live in an area only effected by tsunami's? why does it have to protect against that for you to consider it a reasonable alternative to traditional buildings? Just think how many lives would have been saved from all the tornado's we've had just this year in the states. Tsunami's aren't as frequent as tornadoes and earthquakes.


edit on 23-5-2011 by Under Water because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by Under Water
 


Nice thread, but seeing what happened in Joplin yesterday........nothing is "disaster proof."

Mother Nature has a giant eraser, and when she pulls out the EF5, she can wipe us out like we were never here.



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Under Water
 


Nice thread, but seeing what happened in Joplin yesterday........nothing is "disaster proof."

Mother Nature has a giant eraser, and when she pulls out the EF5, she can wipe us out like we were never here.


If all the homes and businesses in Joplin would have been built of monolithic domes, i'm sure there would have been less casualties.

Look, I know that there will be those disasters that are beyond our technology. But truth is, many people die in the non-epic storms too, and these homes could save lives and help people live and sleep a little easier. I don't understand why anyone would want to try so hard to find reasons to not like these structures. It can save lives, it can save property, it can give you peace of mind, it can be more green and more cost efficient, your power bills will be lowered. There is so much to like about them. Why all the negativity??



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by Under Water
 


Claims don't equal results. Has this guy placed his homes into tests where thousands of tons are pushing against them while a crane drops boulders onto it? That's what a tsunami is. This home would be torn from its foundation in just earth removal alone.
For argument's sake, lets say the house tears free, yet remains intact; its occupants would be the equivalent of children thrown in a clothes dryer. As the poster said above. Nothing is 100% disaster proof. Research EF5 tornado and see if this guy's spects hold up.
I'm starting to question whether or not you're a shill for this company.



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by Under Water
 


No offense meant. I am a fan of the homes. I would love to build something similar, but it is cost prohibitive for now.

Yes, it is a vast improvement from typical construction techniques, I was only commenting on the whole "unsinkable Titanic" view that always gets us into trouble. Don't tempt fate by calling something "disaster-proof" because Mother Nature loves to prove us wrong!



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by Mactire
reply to post by Under Water
 


Claims don't equal results. Has this guy placed his homes into tests where thousands of tons are pushing against them while a crane drops boulders onto it? That's what a tsunami is. This home would be torn from its foundation in just earth removal alone.
For argument's sake, lets say the house tears free, yet remains intact; its occupants would be the equivalent of children thrown in a clothes dryer. As the poster said above. Nothing is 100% disaster proof. Research EF5 tornado and see if this guy's spects hold up.
I'm starting to question whether or not you're a shill for this company.



Go read the damn site yourself if you want to know. The homes have been tested yes, and the results are published. I never claimed that anything is 100% disaster proof. All I did was share my dream home with everyone here. I live on the gulf coast and it's almost hurricane season. I'm in Louisiana and down the road from me is the most epic flood we've ever seen in modern history. Members of my family are loosing everything right now as we speak. I woke up to hear more news of another devastating outbreak of tornados last night. My heart breaks for all the loss of life we've seen just this year, and is yet to come. I'm scared to death living in my 90 year old shack in the ghetto in louisiana. I only wish I could live in a monolithic dome, then I wouldn't have to live in fear and evacuate every time a hurricane comes.

I can't believe you would accuse me of working for the company just because I wanted to share my dream home with people who I thought had the same concerns as me. Some of you make me sick. This is how you treat someone who was trying to be helpful? Whatever. I quit.

Mods, if you really think this thread is such a waste of space, please delete it. I'm sick to my stomach trying to defend myself against such unnecessary negativity. I'll continue saving money and hope one day i can build one of these for my family. The rest of you can continue to complain about the weather. I'm out.



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Under Water
 


No offense meant. I am a fan of the homes. I would love to build something similar, but it is cost prohibitive for now.

Yes, it is a vast improvement from typical construction techniques, I was only commenting on the whole "unsinkable Titanic" view that always gets us into trouble. Don't tempt fate by calling something "disaster-proof" because Mother Nature loves to prove us wrong!


Fine, i changed my thread title. Never meant to make it sound like it could survive an asteriod impact, or nuclear explosion or any other unthinkable disaster. I thought I made the facts clear enough with all the information i packed into all of my posts. Especially when i said NEARLY disaster proof in my posts. Seems regardless of what I posted, no one could read past my title.

edit on 23-5-2011 by Under Water because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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In England we build home from Bricks !
its true... and more thank just one.
some times 3 bricks thick.
and we Dont have earth quacks and tornados.
maybe thats why?
why do americans build cheap wood homes
that keep geting blone away?
edit on 23-5-2011 by buddha because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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Didn't mean to come off like I was attacking you, because I wasn't, just the optimism of the designer. Look. The homes are fine enough, but I've seen mother nature at her worst, and these structures aren't going to cut it, and no offense to you or the architect, but there is no way to test for half of the disasters he's claiming these homes would survive.
The site is little more than a Billy Mays infomercial for dome homes, and the more extravagant the design, as seen in some of the finished homes and concept work, the more susceptible to the elements they become. Personally, when choosing a place to live it really all does come down to "location, location, location".


So, I apologize. If this represents your dream home, then by all means, don't let anyone sway your decision to lay down the cash. Who am I to tell you what kind of architecture best suits you and your comfort needs?



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