Don't Be Distracted : The Real Problem = Historic Mississippi Flood/Intentional Levee Breach

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posted on May, 15 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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Mississippi River flooding: Residents in Morganza Floodway pack up; some refuse to leave


“I don’t see water, so I’m going to stay,” said Kim Krantz, who nevertheless packed up everything in her two-story house on the vulnerable south side of town. “When I see water, I’ll get out. It’s that simple.”

www.nola.com...

Here is an article about that people who are refusing to leave. I understand it's hard to leave your stuff, and home and all of that, but they really should get out of there. The news tonight was talking to a woman, who has moved stuff out of her house, and has a kayak ready, but she isn't leaving, they seem to think it isn't going to get bad where they are. I know a few Cajuns, and they are tough people,wish them all the best, but not even a Cajun can stop 25 feet of water!




posted on May, 15 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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I accidentally ran across this a couple minutes ago. Could they mean the flood? or flood/earthquake? I'm going to try to find the original source



Then he shows a press release announcing that: "KBR has been awarded a contract announced by the Department of Homeland Security's United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) component. The Indefinite Delivery /Indefinite Quantity contingency contract is to support ICE facilities and has a maximum value of $395 million over a 5 year term. The contract provides for establishing temporary detention and processing capabilities in the event of an emergency influx of immigrants into the United States, or to support the rapid development of new programs." He believes this is a cover for the upcoming catastrophe along the New Madrid Fault.


and



"It is not just an 'oil spill' that BP has unleashed on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico. What BP has done is that they have uncorked an 'oil volcano' that is violently spewing oil and gas out of the the floor of the Gulf of Mexico so violently and with such pressure that it is beyond the capacity of human technology to control it. Millions upon millions of gallons of oil have already been pumped into the Gulf of Mexico, and millions upon millions more will continue to be pumped into the Gulf before it is all over. So could all of this violent activity on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico spark seismic activity in the region that could potentially be absolutely catastrophic? Could this 'oil volcano' cause an earthquake along the New Madrid fault line that is so powerful that it could bring about "the end of the world as we know it" for those living in the area? Those are legitimate questions."



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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I'm a Cajun near the Floodway. I know it's dangerous but why people will not leave is not because of there house or stuff. It's a way of Life for these people. How would you like it if someone told you to pack you stuff and get out. You mite not be able to return to your little peace of Heaven for a VERY Long Time! This is everything they know and love. It's going to be washed away. How would you feel? Put yourself in there shoes for a minute But you have to understand they come from a different way of life than most of you even know about. I'm not trying to say these people are right or wrong. They just don't want to believe it. It's a Nightmare for them.

I'm sorry if this offends anyone.

here's a little history if anyone wants it:
www.americaswetlandresources.com...
edit on 5/15/11 by lildeuce because: Added Some History about the water way



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by lildeuce
 


I completely agree with you, and I think well said without offending people here. People don't want to leave their homes, their lives.

But we don't don't want them to LOSE their lives over it either.

It is sad the whole thing has come to this.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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I'm not sure where this was taken but its from today. Judging from his accent, somewhere between new orleans and baton rouge.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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Do some research on "Wolf Creek Dam" in Kentucky. It's gonna blow, it's gonna be messy. : (



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:32 AM
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I too need to add something about people not leaving. One thing to remember, it's not a big tsunami wave coming at them. They slowly opened the morganza too keep the flow of the flood slow enough for animals and people to get out of its way. When they say 25 feet of flood in an area, you have to subtract that number from the number of your elevation. So if your elevated 15 feet above sea level, and like most people in this area, you've lifted your house another 5 feet, that leaves you with 5 feet of flood waters in your home. If your in a two story home, you've probably moved all your things upstairs to stay dry, and you can still sleep in your bed. Most people here have boats. If the water gets too high for their cars, and they decide to get out, they will get their boat and leave. Cajuns are a proud, hard working, and hearty people. They will stop and help anyone they see. Cajun country is far different from New Orleans. I know there will be some areas that the waters will be too much for the homes and will cover the roofs, and I hope those people will have the sense to get out before it's too late.

I went through a flood once with my family. I'm the oldest kid, and had already moved out. My house wasn't flooded, but when I saw that my family already had a few feet of water in their home, instead of them leaving, I went to them. I packed a bag and had to walk with my arms up in the air to keep my bag dry. I saw snakes swimming past me as I slowly walked through water up to my chin. I got to my parents and we all camped out upstairs. People were constantly coming out to check on everyone in the area, and the paper came out and took a bunch of pictures. It was a very interesting experience. The whole area stayed, no one left. Everyone helped each other.

Now what is happening is far beyond that and the waters will stay high for weeks, maybe even a month. And it will be hard to camp out in your soggy nasty home for that long. I'm sure people will leave once the water gets past a certain level of comfort. But there will always be those who will stand guard, not just for their homes, but their entire area. People will patrol and guard themselves around here. You'll see them in their boats with their guns waving as they pass. They will probably ride their boats to their nearest open stores for food and beer, and then ride home and fish from off their roofs. It honestly wouldn't surprise me.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:38 AM
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Good day folks, I hope you're all keeping well. Still sending my thoughts and prayers to those affected. I found an article I thought I'd share: BBC News, 16 May 2011 Last updated at 08:06 ET

Mississippi floods: Thousands flee as floodgates open



Thousands have evacuated the US state of Louisiana after floodgates were opened on Saturday to relieve pressure from the swollen Mississippi River. More floodgates are to be opened in the coming days, for the first time in several decades. The man-made floods will damage thousands of homes and hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland. Officials say this is the only way to save more populated areas along the river like Baton Rouge and New Orleans.

The article goes on to say that by opening the Morganza Spillway floodgates alone, up to 3,000 sq miles will be under water. "25,000 could be adversely affected."

The flood waters are expected to inundate homes and farms in the state's Cajun country under an expected 10-20ft (3-7m) of water...
Opening all 125 gates on the spillway would release 600,000 cubic ft of water every second.

They also have a floodmap at the above BBC link.

I keep hearing how much is going on, but does anyone have any information about how long this is expected to last? Is there any end in sight for these folks?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 10:23 AM
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I've heard it said in various news reports that it could last as long as the end of June. I don't think anyone really knows to be honest. What if the rain doesn't stop? Will that prolong it even further. And what if it stays long enough to collide with hurricane season. Yikes.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by lildeuce
I'm a Cajun near the Floodway. I know it's dangerous but why people will not leave is not because of there house or stuff. It's a way of Life for these people. How would you like it if someone told you to pack you stuff and get out. You mite not be able to return to your little peace of Heaven for a VERY Long Time! This is everything they know and love. It's going to be washed away. How would you feel? Put yourself in there shoes for a minute But you have to understand they come from a different way of life than most of you even know about. I'm not trying to say these people are right or wrong. They just don't want to believe it. It's a Nightmare for them.

I'm sorry if this offends anyone.

here's a little history if anyone wants it:
www.americaswetlandresources.com...
edit on 5/15/11 by lildeuce because: Added Some History about the water way


I understand what you are saying and I agree!!

I've said it more than a dozen times... it is their home... it is their life...
if I was in that same situation... I would paint cuss words on my roof,
in the hopes satellites and helicopters would see my opinion of the CoE who opened the spillway!

But... the safety of these people is what I am thinking about...

it has been said by many people here...
The flood water isnt going to reside anytime soon...
and will be a problem for a while...

I pray for these people!

I wish them all the best! and I hope... I pray that somehow.
very few people are actually flooded... but truth be told... more people
than you can imagine are gonna get flooded...

I am not trying to offend anyone by saying "Get Out!"
Please do not take it that way!

Like I said earlier... my family would do the same thing!



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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While its not the prettiest thing...
And its been months since I had photoshop open,
My skills are rusty

but I wanted to make something,
Something that could stand for the hard work that people have put into the updates,
spreading the word, and their heart felt compassion for those effected by this horrible event.
Its a badge...
its in remembrance, it is in honor of those whose lives have been changed by this flood,
It is my way of saying, thanks to all of you on here.
It is my way of saying,
"Never Forget The People, the Flood of 2011"



...not the best and its kinda oblonged... I totally forget to factor in I made it on a wide-screen monitor...
but the meaning behind it, is still there.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by vivalarevolution


Originally posted by vivalarevolution
Do some research on "Wolf Creek Dam" in Kentucky. It's gonna blow, it's gonna be messy. : (


 


Can you elaborate?
I have done some research and I come up with nothing of alarm...
but yet..
your not the first person to mention that the Wolf Creek Dam in Kentucky poses risks...

So what am I missing?
What is the risk?
Sources and links are most preferable...

Thanks!



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by EvolEric
 

It would appear that the dam has a serious limestone deterioration undermining problem and has had it's water level lowered by 40feet for several years (since 2007) to reduce pressure .

(dams should have clay under them as a water 'tight' agent other wise over time the hydraulic pressure undermines the damn by eroding it's foundation , which has happened at Wolf Creek)



The dam, located on Lake Cumberland, was deemed "high-risk" by the Corps and a breach would be catastrophe, flooding towns and neighborhoods along the Cumberland River, including areas in both Hendersonville and Nashville.




Because while the potential damage to Burkesville would be in the millions, the damage to Nashville, located further downstream, would be measured in the billions.





A massive project to fix leaks at Wolf Creek Dam probably will get more expensive and take longer to complete than expected, according to federal officials. The Corps did not release an estimate on the new price or a completion date. .... One early estimate of the cost to fix the dam was $317 million. That had climbed to $584 million before the change in constructions methods in Critical Area 1. A key contractor predicted at one point that the project would be done by summer 2012, and perhaps sooner, but it appears that date will be pushed back.


So the damn already leaks and has some severe structural issues and it is a lot of water , but i doubt they are backing anything more than usual behind it unless they have no other choice :



he's right though if that thing gave up it has a HUGE amount of water behind it
edit on 16-5-2011 by Silverlok because: stupid google links
edit on 16-5-2011 by Silverlok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


wow...
Thanks for that... very informative!!!

Scary thought for those living in that area...
Scary thought in general!

I never knew that problem existed!



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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this guys been goin down the river and giving reports on what he sees everyday. He also lets the newspeople what he thinks about 911 on occasion. lol

edit on 16-5-2011 by mayabong because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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Something to keep in mind, are animals that come with the flood.



10-foot alligator found, shot, removed from flooding Mississippi River
www.nola.com...

It was shot, noosed and hauled away.



East bank residents are urged to stay away from Mississippi River levee
www.nola.com...



Flood protection authorities in East Jefferson are urging members of the public to stay away from the Mississippi River levee while the river is at its peak.



“We know how people enjoy using the levees for recreation, especially when the weather is so beautiful, but the river at the stages and the velocity now being experienced poses a great threat to the public,” said engineer Bob Turner, executive director of the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority East.


This was news to me, as my daughter and neighbor went out to the levee yesterday!


Also I've heard that the levees or at least a levee in New Orleans is leaking, and there was water in the French Quater around Decatur and St. Phillips, I don't think it's anything major, just wanted to put it out there.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:30 PM
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Revised Inundation Map Shows Destination For Floodwater:



NEW ORLEANS -- The Army Corps of Engineers has revised its inundation map, showing a slightly reduced impact from the partial opening of the Morganza Spillway. Read more: www.wdsu.com...




www.wdsu.com...



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 08:39 AM
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I found some satellite images from NASA which look pretty interesting comparing 2006 to the recent flood.


Recent Landsat satellite data captured by the USGS and NASA on May 10 shows the major flooding of the Mississippi River around Memphis, Tenn. and along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas as seen from 438 miles above the Earth.
NASA news


edit on 5/17/2011 by mugger because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by WhoDat09
 

WhoDat, you are not going to believe the Articiles on the front page of the Arkansas Democrat Gazette. I am so mad I could scream.

5/16/11 "Arkansans rest easier, but Louisianians flee."
"Some took advantage of it being closer to their homes than usual , fishing in water right next to the levees."

That is down right "Cold". If it wasn't for the sufferening the people of Lousiana are going through it would be much worse in Arkansas. I live here and I am ashame of that attitude.

5/17/11 "Drought conditions aid Louisiana basin."
"The water wasn't rising as fast as expected, largely because of early drought conditions have already parched the soil" and "it just threatens small bayou communities" [like they don't count and no big deal]

So are they trying to say the flood is a good thing, and saved them from a drought. That is sick, they go way beyond even trying to play it down and try to make it look like a good thing. I could just scream. The media is making everyone in this country uncaring and not seeing any need to help. I noticed that after the Haiti quake, and Japan. No news about Japan but the first few weeks. Hell they are still having 6. mag quakes. The last I heard from someone in Japan the US had sent 2 helicopters with aid supplies and that was 3 weeks later. We can't help anybody because we spend all our money on weapons to kill people not save them. No wonder the world hates us now. OK , I am ranting again. My morning rant for today.



posted on May, 17 2011 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by WhoDat09
 


Look at the size of this snake taken by a friend of mine around Baton Rouge...She put it on her facebook page.

www.facebook.com...





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