Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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Per CNN, evacuation zone has been expanded to 6 miles. This is a seriously dangerous situation unfolding and we will be the last to know. BP oil spill taught me not to believe a word they tell us.




posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Does Japan have the equivalent of the US NRC? I assume they do, but not really sure.


Sure do ...
Japanese Atomic Energy Commission



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:17 PM
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Japan may have hours to prevent nuclear meltdown
8:18pm EST
By Scott DiSavino
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Japanese officials may only have hours to cool reactors that have been disabled by Friday's massive earthquake and tsunami or face a nuclear meltdown.
Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) (9501.T: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) is racing to cool down the reactor core after a highly unusual "station blackout" -- the total loss of power necessary to keep water circulating through the plant to prevent overheating.
Daiichi Units 1, 2 and 3 reactors shut down automatically at 2:46 p.m. local time due to the earthquake. But about an hour later, the on-site diesel back-up generators also shut, leaving the reactors without alternating current (AC) power.
That caused Tepco to declare an emergency and the government to evacuate thousands of people from near the plant. Such a blackout is "one of the most serious conditions that can affect a nuclear plant," according to experts at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a U.S. based nuclear watchdog group.
www.reuters.com...



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by nuclearinfo
 

I've been monitoring Tepco's web-site all day (approximately the last 10 hours). I must say, their press releases are coming out pretty regularly. (about every hour or so). Of course, they are filled with some industry-specific language. But they seem pretty "open" about the whole thing. Of course, there are probably regulations requiring some of those disclosures, with specific timing requirements as well.
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: fomatting, spelwing adn grwhmer.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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What I would do...get fire trucks to the scene [I know they are busy saving people but this is a bigger need] pump water from the nearest water source directly into the cooling tank....no need to set up some fancy system, just run some hoses through the front door straight to the core...easier said than done but damn just get some water on that thing!



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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Originally posted by AnonymousMoose
What I would do...get fire trucks to the scene [I know they are busy saving people but this is a bigger need] pump water from the nearest water source directly into the cooling tank....no need to set up some fancy system, just run some hoses through the front door straight to the core...easier said than done but damn just get some water on that thing!


No expert here, but from everything I've read about meltdowns, water hoses won't cut it.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:23 PM
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6 miles
i would be alot further than 6 miles away from that crap. Could you imagine staying in a house 6 miles away from a goddam nuclear reactor unpluged lol sweet dreams bed time family ,off to bed you go lol



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by ANNED
A Scram(safety control rod axe man) using reactor poisons will cause long term problems restarting the reactor as they must be removed.

Wow. SCRAM. That's a term I have not heard in a very long time - since I was a kid growing-up in the North-East, when the whole TMI thing was going-down.

It's kind of sad actually to be hearing it again now. I hoped I never would hear that term again.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:29 PM
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I am no expert here. But where are the generators? They should have kicked in when the power went out, to keep pumping the coolant thru the rods or whatever. I watched a documentary on the science channel a few months back talking about how contingency plans would kick in if power went out.. I hate to do this, but what if their is damage to the reactors themselves then? Either case I think its going to take a miracle for these reactors not to leak some if not allot of radiation. If it was an easy fix it would be contained already. I am no expert so I do not know, but I have common sense.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by Bicent76
But where are the generators?


They were there....until the tsunami flood waters came alon....



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I am not an expert either, I was simply responding to an earlier post about the water levels dropping...the core needs to be submerged in water, the control rods should take care of the reactivity...if they have no power whatsoever the SCRAM should be in place, but with no electricity/pumps there is no backup water supply....

I would have to do more research about the SCRAM process and if the rods could prevent meltdown...I know rods control the reactivity but will inserting all rods stop the chain reaction, especially if the dropping water level is increasing heat in the core?



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


SCRAMs actually happen all the time. It is the term for an automatic shutdown due to the plants safety systems.
Browse through the last month on the nrc website and you will see a few. SCRAMs are emergency shutdowns, but they happen for many reasons.



NRC event notifications



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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They were there....until the tsunami flood waters came alon....


what news agency is reporting that?


If tsunami waves hit the reactors then their is damage. The force of the wave with cars houses and debris in it is a no brainer. yet where is a news link to back that up?
edit on 11-3-2011 by Bicent76 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by SkunkSense
 


Thanks man!
I must point out however, that most of the sources being cited (at least the one's I'm citing), are all "PTB" (powers-that-be) sources.

PS: Yes, I am just another "alias" on jude11's account.
edit on 2011-3-11 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by Surfrat
according to experts at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a U.S. based nuclear watchdog group.


You have to remember that the “union of concerned scientist” is an anti nuke propaganda group. They have been scaring the crap out of people for decades.

I wouldn’t even waste a grain of salt on what they say.

There is a list of professionally sounding “fill in the blank” groups that were created to scare the public and spread propaganda to cripple the population. The UCS is one of them.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Bicent76

They were there....until the tsunami flood waters came alon....


what news agency is reporting that?


If tsunami waves hit the reactors then their is damage.



You were asking about the giant backup diesel generators...not the reactors...



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by nuclearinfo
 


No doubt you are correct.
But, we the unwashed masses don't hear the term very often.
I haven't heard it since like 1979.



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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OK, new question:

I know those control rods fit pretty precisely into the fuel... could the problem be a misalignment due to the quake? I mean, it's not hard for a quake to bend metal, you know, and if those things aren't fitting properly, that could be one of the issues.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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I am not sure what is more scary the fact that multiple reactors are in a position where they might fail or the fact that Japan has 54 commercial reactors throughout the country?


Even so, 10 of Japan's 54 commercial reactors were shut down because of the quake, and Tokyo Electric Power said it had to reduce power generation. Japan gets about 30 percent of its electricity from nuclear power. Read more: www.foxnews.com...



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 09:41 PM
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The control rods do just what their name implies, control the reaction in the core. With the rods down they absorb the fission products being given off by the fuel and prevent them from causing further reactivity. So although no fission is taking place there is still heat being given off by the fuel and it needs to be cooled.

A SCRAM will happen very fast and at the hint of an earthquake to minimize damage to the fuel assemblies. It is less expensive and easier to recover from a SCRAM then damaged fuel.
edit on 11-3-2011 by nuclearinfo because: response to Homer the "Redneck"





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