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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 648.htm
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posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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i dont think the full scope of this disaster has even begun to sink in yet for most people. the Japan we knew several months ago i fear is gone..forever. the repercusions of this disaster will be felt in the coming weeks and months and will touch all of our lives in some way. i will miss Japan..it will never be like it was.




posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by monica86
Look at this image.
They just showed it on NHK.

It didn't look like a simulation, however, the reactors appear covered with fiber...


EDIT: Actually, looking at the other buildings in the plant, it does appear it was a simulation
edit on 10-4-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)


This image is a load of cr@p...straight from the editors at NHK ....



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Wind has limits on how much energy we can take from the winds before we change the climate drastically. Solar just flat doesn't work for high-current AC applications. Hydro is awesome, but we are running out of rivers. Wave power is still in development, although promising. We are enacting legislation on fossil fuels due to carbon dioxide exhausts that are forcing them out. What's left? Nuclear!


You forgot to mention Geo-thermal power which CAN meet those high current demands
when properly managed, it is sustainable, safe, has Zero emissions & is cheap.......
steam turbines.... ahhhhhh lovely


just one snag.... no carbon emissions that can be capped and traded


PEACE,
RK



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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At least these guys will have a lovely new environment to move into once we are all gone:

"To the continuing annoyance of nuclear physicists, the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans thrives in the cooling pool of nuclear reactors amid radioactivity levels lethal to mammals"

Source: Encyclopedia Britannica



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Rigel Kent
 


Do you mean this type of geothermal?

Do you really want to go mucking about down there where we really have no idea what we're doing?

It's like trying to work on the camshaft of an engine while it's running...



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Rigel Kent
 





You forgot to mention Geo-thermal power which CAN meet those high current demands when properly managed, it is sustainable, safe, has Zero emissions & is cheap....... steam turbines..


one down side...increased risk of earthquakes



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by Moonbeams771
Good news everyone - you can get a little dose of plutonium and it will do you no harm!


Plutonium was detected from the soil sampled at Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS site on Mar. 21st, 22nd, 25th and 28th. The amount is so small that the Pu is not harmful to human body.


I think that now we know that radiation is much safer than we previously thought, we should start a campaign to allow us to have frequent medical x-rays. Even better still, we should get the Russians to remove the Chernobyl exclusion zone and get people to re-inhabit the town of Pripyat. It would be lovely to see kids playing in that park again.

The local health shop could sell a range ionizing radiation pills that will enable us all to benefit from the health giving properties of a dose of radiation.

There maybe the odd scientist who disagrees but I think we should throw caution to the wind and embrace radiation with open arms!

Who's with me?

Anyone....?

Latest JAIF Report


I can see it now...they'll resurrect that pluto-boy cartoon and show it worldwide.

Drink plutonium every day, no problem. What, your urine's glowing? Don't worry, it's supposed to do that.
edit on 10-4-2011 by notsofunnyguy because: bad typing before caffeine set in.



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
Aw, come on! I thought this was all over except for the radiating, and now you come up with this?


I didn't do it It was True American's fault HONEST. Scary thing is he predicted an 8.0 plus quake for Japan in March over a year ago and posted that here at ATS...

Seems that USGS and Japanese scientists share his concern

Just looked at Iris and saw this one

09-APR-2011 12:57:49 30.01 131.81 6.1 21.3 KYUSHU, JAPAN
www.iris.edu...



edit on 10-4-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
Experts are now saying that the situation has no immediate end in sight and all four plants are emitting continous streams of radiation.

Removal of debris started using robot machinery. The debris is emitting HUNDREDS of microsieverts per hour. Plan is to seal the debris in special containers and store it on site strictly supervised




Strictly supervised by TEPCO bosses hopefully.

Maybe they can sit on top of the containers and get their nether parts nice and toasty.



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical
reply to post by Rigel Kent
 


Do you mean this type of geothermal?

Do you really want to go mucking about down there where we really have no idea what we're doing?

It's like trying to work on the camshaft of an engine while it's running...


I disagree,
Engineered properly it is safe,
Industrial plants can be sighted well away from urban areas and I am unaware of any disasters caused by these plants.....
I am skeptical about the true cause of the 3.4 quake in Basel. Can you tell me if there have been any disasters at any of the dozens of plants in the USA?
and in any case an ordinary home can have its own domestic system (heat transfer) with 3 loops at d = 50m
or a horizontal coil system at d = 5m
I suggest they should be mandatory on all new build houses.
Back on topic
In a country like Japan, Geothermal could have met much of the energy needs. Building so many nuclear plants around the coast of such quake prone islands is just plain daft. but as we all know, governments get told what power plants to build if they want to secure those loans.

PEACE,
RK



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by EarthCitizen07

To answer that, I have to explain what enrichment is....

Uranium has two main isotopes, U-238 which is common, and U-235 which is rare. Both are radioactive, in that they decay naturally, but the rare U-235 puts off more highly energetic neutrons when it decays. U-238 will also put these out, but only when initially hit with a high-energy neutron.

Enriching uranium simply means that you increase the amount of U-235 in it. Typically this is done by use of centrifuges which make the slightly heavier U-238 atoms settle to the 'bottom' of the mixture being enriched, and leave the U-235 atoms in the 'top' layer. The difference in weight of the atoms is so slight that it takes extremely powerful centrifuges a long time to manage this enrichment process, usually operating several times.

A nuclear bomb is typically enriched over 90%, meaning that the uranium in it is over 90% U-235. A power plant does not use this rich a mixture, and typically is only enriched to a few percent. That is one major reason why it is impossible for a power plant to explode like a nuclear bomb.

The only way to 'de-enrich' uranium is to dilute the U-235 with more U-238... and even that does not remove all the radioactive tendencies of the fuel. The spent fuel rods already have such a low enrichment of U-235 that they cannot be used for power generation any more, but they are still 'hot'.

Fusion only works with very small, light atoms such as hydrogen. We have no way to fuse two uranium atoms together, and even if we managed to do so, the result would probably be something much much much more powerful that uranium or plutonium. Atoms of twice the size of uranium simply don't exist in nature as they are far too unstable.

Fusion is not an exact opposite of fission. They use different elements completely. Fission uses primarily uranium (or one of its decay products, plutonium) and after a long drawn-out decay cycle it all turns into plain old lead. Fusion uses isotopes of hydrogen and the end product is helium.

Hope that explains things...

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Hmmm...

The lead lining of my tinfoil hat maybe leaching into my brain, but...


Wouldn't evacuating an area on the "threat" of a possible, future event, saqy a mega-quake or more likely, a volcanic eruption, be easier and less likely to cause general panic than an evacuation due to potentially lethal doses of radioactive fallout?


Seems to be a distinct psychological difference in the two threats; known vs. relatively unkonwn.

That could be an exploitable advantage for the authorities in charge.


Then, just declare the evacuation zone as a "Nature preserve" due to the unpredictable nature of the possible volcanic and/or siesmic activity expected.

No one need ever mention the radioactive contamination in those areas ever again.



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by okiecowboy
 


Increased risk of earthquakes? but aren't the favourable sites usually situated on or near areas of seismic activity?
Isn't that the whole point? Maybe TBTB dont want 'em on a grand scale cos there is Zero or little Carbon Tax to be collected from them. hence all of the bad press.

Anyway an earthquake destroying a nuclear plant will do far more damage to life and the environment than one which destroys a geothermal power plant and the latter would be much easier to repair.

PEACE,
RK

edit on 10-4-2011 by Rigel Kent because: to add "or little"



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by Rigel Kent

Geothermal is promising as a supplement, but believe it or not there is only a finite amount of heat within the crust. Pull too much heat out of it, and you lower the frost line, which can impact building foundations and plant growth.

It is a little ironic that you mention that... I actually have some plans for a future geothermal heating/cooling system for my house. I am just waiting on money to build it. Of course, I have one such system nestled in 40 acres of land... I don't think geothermal could possibly keep up with the heating/cooling needs of some place like, say, New York. Too much energy usage and not enough land.

Japan, remember, has little land and uses a LOT of energy.

Every energy source has limits; people tend to forget that. Any time you remove energy from a closed system, you leave less energy in that system. The planet has plenty of ways to pull energy out of it, but in the end, we are still robbing the planet of some of its energy. This isn't necessarily all bad, as the river near me shows; it was originally called an 'untamable' river that rose and fell regularly, washing away farms and allowing droughts. A series of hydroelectric dams along it has turned it into a large recreation area, teeming with wildlife, and has brought a new source of power to this area. Of course, that came with the problems of losing land which was once farms and is now covered in water, but the advantages of maintaining flood/drought control outweighs this for us in the area.

The uranium and plutonium that are used in this plant, as in any plant, came from the earth itself. If left alone, there would be just as much radiation as there is now, only it would not be concentrated. Uranium is mined, not created, and enriched to increase concentration of U-235, not atomically modified. This is fuel from the ground.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by Rigel Kent

Engineered properly it is safe,

That's what I am saying about nuclear power.

'Nuff said?


TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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I was and am looking for the results of hale samples since hale is formed my water drops that travel up and down in the upper atmosphere and form very compact a diverse samples of the atmosphere, I thought it would be good to know what the results were.
So far this what I found....
Anyone else that wants to join in the search for information would be greatly appreciated. worldwidescience.org...



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by rbrtj
 


I also found in regard to seaweed samples...
www.theweathernetwork.com...&stormfile=radioactive_material_found_i_280311?ref=twitternews



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by rbrtj
 


www.canada.com...
Radiation from Japan detected in B.C. seaweed, rainwater
By Tracy Sherlock, Vancouver Sun March 29, 2011 Be the first to post a comment
StoryPhotos ( 2 )Video ( 3 )

More Images » Workers in radiation protection suits prepare for the decontamination of two Fukushima nuclear plant workers.Photograph by: AFP, Getty Images, Vancouver SunVANCOUVER — Radiation from the Japanese nuclear reactor damaged in the March 11 earthquake and tsunami has been detected in B.C. seaweed and rainwater samples, researchers say.

Tests found iodine-131 in samples taken in the Lower Mainland on March 19, 20 and 25, Simon Fraser University said in a news release.

SFU nuclear scientist Kris Starosta is confident the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant is responsible for the recent discovery, but he said there is no immediate danger to the public.

“As of now, the levels we’re seeing are not harmful to humans. We’re basing this on Japanese studies following the Chernobyl incident in 1986 where levels of iodine-131 were four times higher than what we’ve detected in our rainwater so far,” Starosta said. “Studies of nuclear incidents and exposures are used to define radiation levels at which the increase in cancer risk is statistically significant. When compared to the information we have today, we have not reached levels of elevated risk.”

The rainwater was collected at SFU’s Burnaby campus and in downtown Vancouver, while seaweed samples were collected in North Vancouver near the SeaBus terminal.

“The only possible source of iodine-131 in the atmosphere is a release from a nuclear fission,” Starosta said. “Iodine-131 has a half-life of eight days, thus we conclude the only possible release which could happen is from the Fukushima incident.”

The radiation found in B.C. was carried by the jet stream, and is now falling over the West Coast with rain, which is mixing with sea water and accumulating in seaweed, SFU said in a news release.

Japanese officials are still struggling to stabilize the situation at the six-reactor Fukushima Daiichi complex. The situation remains “very serious,” the International Atomic Energy Agency said Monday.

The plant’s operator said radiation above 1,000 millisieverts per hour was found on Monday in the water in the underground tunnels near the plant, Reuters reported.

When asked what effect this emission might have on fish, Starosta said he could only speculate.

“One thousand millisieverts per hour is a lot, but this has been only detected in the service tunnel under the plant. The amount fish can be exposed to will be different. The signatures may be very weak if the leak is small and the contamination is diluted,” Starosta said.

Radioactive water leaking from a reactor at Japan’s damaged nuclear plants isn’t likely to harm B.C. salmon because they don’t travel as far as the coast of Japan, said Nancy Davis, deputy director of the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission.

“They tend to go to Gulf of Alaska, the Bering Sea, or maybe as far as the central North Pacific, but they are not maturing off Japan and swimming all the way back here,” Davis said. “Immature and maturing salmon are in the deep ocean, they’re not on the Japanese shelf or near the nuclear plant.”

She said it’s possible that Japanese chum salmon might be in the waters near the damaged plant, but that they would not be returning to Japan for another three or four years. Japan mostly produces chum salmon, which Davis said is very unlikely to be imported into British Columbia.

Davis said it is important to consider what elements are involved and what their half-lifes are, and how the salmon would come into contact with the radioactive materials.

Thanks guys for all your efforts



posted on Apr, 10 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
It is a little ironic that you mention that... I actually have some plans for a future geothermal heating/cooling system for my house. I am just waiting on money to build it.


I'm looking at a hydronics system. Biggest issue in Vegas is the heat in summer and huge power bills for AC.. winter I just use my wood burning stove to augment the gas heater.

With hydronics you put a valence around each room of the house and run copper pipes with freon. You use a solar pump to move the freon and you need a heat dump (my 35,000 gallon pool will do nicely and heat the pool as well)

In effect you turn the house into a refrigerator and use no energy from the grid


For heating you can add pipes to the floor and reverse the flow and you now have radionic heating. (over simplified but that is the basics.) Just need the cash to implement it





Hydronic Cooling
oikos.com...

edit on 10-4-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



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