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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 626.htm
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posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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Originally posted by Flyinghaggis
reply to post by jadedANDcynical

Could not access link you gave, is it same as this perhaps

Link



Nope, the one I was referring to deals specifically with the safety systems. Try this:

Link and scroll down to the 17th of march.

Also updated photos can be found here.

Man I LOVE cryptome.org...




posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 08:37 AM
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I think this graphic from the Japan Times gives a really good idea of radiation levels and effects that a lay person can understand.

Maximum Radiation Levels in Eastern Japan as of April 9, 2011



Link from the Japan Times: www.japantimes.co.jp...




edit on 9-4-2011 by Redux because: added close up of reactor 3 stat



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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Maximum Radiation Levels per Prefecture

Click on the link for a larger interactive picture with more details....

www.japantimes.co.jp...




posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Oop, so sorry, thanks.

Oh well, at least the link I provided gives updated readings,
not to mention hundreds of other charts that are regularly updated.


Oops, forgot to mention it needs translated. Chrome does that automatically, so I forgot.
edit on 4/9/11 by makeitso because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by Teknetium
 


mmm yeah

Cs-137 will stay around for years , yet looking at the japanese government measurements one would say it can disappear in a week.. Of course this miracle requires shutting up whoever made the "wrong" measurements ....
see this
IAEA measurements issue post by monica86
 


they still have 3 reactors in full meltdown and a smoking SPF, they are still polluting the atmosphere and waters and are not able to get near the reactors (the 8 hours evacuation we saw just yesterday was not for the aftershock but because air around n.1 was 100 Sv per hour) but I have noticed too that the nuclear industry is eager to jump to the phase where conclusions are drawn on this...

who are they kidding, most of us don't expect a big boom. A big boom would mean the top nuclear experts in the world are totally helpless as they are all advising tepco by now I am sure . Their only hope is a slow motion contamination and this is what we are going to get.

if I were them , I would shut up for now, as later, some pretty awful info could come out and they know it.[
edit on 9-4-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 

Can't get it, unable to load, format not supported, cough bs cough. Ok how about this one

Another link

Is that it?

Btw cryptome looks cool.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:17 AM
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NHK World now telecasting again. Came back on about 15 minutes ago (around 14:00 UTC)

I guess the roughly 90-minute downtime when nothing was available due to "the restrictions on the broadcasting rights" has given them time to have a confab and sort out what they should be able to release to the public for now, and what they can't.

I mean, who imposed these sudden "restrictions" on rights to broadcast? Are we to think that NHK TV imposed these restrictions on themselves? That would be absurd.

No, I think that such a "restriction" most likely came from above...


Mike



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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Thanks Mike. Could it be all info now coming from TEPCO is copy written? That would put a big ole' monkey wrench in reporting. If so, nice little loophole they've found. I wouldn't put it past the government to issue a new directive stating as much.Or, the whole situation at Fukushima, has now been categorized as an issue of "National Security". hmmm...

Des
edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:32 AM
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My Fox Houston



US Concrete Pumps Heading to Japan

Updated: Saturday, 09 Apr 2011, 9:12 AM CDT
Published : Saturday, 09 Apr 2011, 9:12 AM CDT

(NewsCore) - One of the world's largest concrete pumps flew from Atlanta to nuclear-hit Japan on Saturday, with another due to leave from Los Angeles.

The pumps will be used to douse water onto the stricken reactors at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, but their presence has raised speculation that Japan may choose to bury the reactors in concrete as Soviet authorities did in the wake of the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

The 95-ton pump, mounted on a 26-wheel truck, was loaded onto a Russian Antonov cargo plane at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The pump can be operated from more than a mile away by remote control, reducing the risk of its operators being exposed to radiation

"Like others all over the world, our thoughts have been on helping the people of Japan," Dave Adams, the chief executive of Putzmeister America, the company which is supplying the pumps, said. "Fortunately, we have a piece of equipment that's working to help cool the reactors, so we're moving fast to get additional pumps to Japan."

Japanese engineers have been pumping tons of water onto the reactors since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami severely damaged four of the Fukushima plant's six reactors.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:42 AM
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TEPCO contractors reject higher radiation dose limit for workers



Companies dispatching workers to Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are refusing to adopt the government-imposed provisional limit on radiation exposure for those workers at the plant, saying it would not be accepted by those at the site, Kyodo News learned Saturday.

The limit was lifted from 100 millisieverts to 250 millisieverts in an announcement made March 15 by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare at the request of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, which has the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency under its wing, and other bodies.

The increase was requested to enable workers to engage in longer hours of assignments and to secure more workers who meet the restriction.


link

Looks like some outside contractors are trying to protect their employees from higher levels of radiation at the Fukushima plant.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by JustMike
NHK World now telecasting again. Came back on about 15 minutes ago (around 14:00 UTC)

I guess the roughly 90-minute downtime when nothing was available due to "the restrictions on the broadcasting rights" has given them time to have a confab and sort out what they should be able to release to the public for now, and what they can't.

I mean, who imposed these sudden "restrictions" on rights to broadcast? Are we to think that NHK TV imposed these restrictions on themselves? That would be absurd.

No, I think that such a "restriction" most likely came from above...


Mike


On one side it's because of the rights of the footage, on the other side it's ideal to censor. When I watch the Dutch national News online, the picture goes black as soon as they show a parts of a soccer game or some other stuff because of those rights.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:59 AM
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Originally posted by Flyinghaggis
reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 

Can't get it, unable to load, format not supported, cough bs cough. Ok how about this one

Another link

Is that it?

Btw cryptome looks cool.



Yep that's one page of the report. Dont know why it's no coming up for you. I've been able to access it kn my iPhone but haven't tried my computer yet. The entire report is a pretty good size (6.9 MB zip file) and has a lot of information.

By the way the 250 milli seivertimit is a yearl dose and workers are getting that mug in 15 minutes o exposure in somp e places at the plant.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 

Well, as far as I know all material that is created and broadcast/telecast is technically copyright, but I'm not sure if that's what you mean by "copy written".
Were you thinking in terms of "scripted", for example?

About the Daiichi case being a matter of national security, in my opinion it is and has been for some time, and I believe I said as much way back in the thread. (I can find the relevant post if wanted.) I don't mean "national security" as in a "cloak-and-dagger" perspective, but simply that security hinges on many things and two of the main ones are being able to maintain a stable economic base and ditto energy supply base. We are already seeing the economic effects and the longer-term aspects of insufficient energy output to meet demand. Then there are the other important aspects such as disruption of transport routes, impact on population in terms of radiation-related illness, possible greater distrust of government and its destabilizing effects on their currency value and so on.

However, while it seems that the Japanese PTB seem to be working in collusion with TEPCo to delay or restrict the release of informaiton, I see this as probably only increasing instability and perhaps working counter to their national security interests. Granted, the situation is so bad that a huge amount of human lives have likely already been impacted, but by not letting their population know the truth and not even widening the evacuation zone (though they are now "considering" it***), they are only delaying the inevitable day when the truth will out and perhaps even greater negative repurcussions will impact their nation in myriad ways.

Best regards,
Mike

And a note to go with the *** above:
The fact that the Japanese govt is "considering" that they should widen the evacuation zone is because they've realized that the current standards for evacuation are based upon a given radiation level over a short period of time, with the radiation source then stopping. However, as the release of radiation is ongoing -- and the govt now accepts this fact -- they have decided to re-evaluate their decision.

This should be a big red flag to anyone in that region: don't wait while your govt officials have all their meetings and finally make up their minds. They are basically telling you that things are worse than they originally stated and that they are now conceding that it is not going to get better anytime soon. It's therefore better to move out if at all possible.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by Leo Strauss
 


Heh, I wonder if that plane is one of Viktor Bout's.

Anyway, Cryptome has pics.




Gary Schmidt, a regional sales manager from Putzmeister America, watches as one of the world's largest concrete boom pumps is loaded onto a Russian Antonov An-124 cargo jet at the Los Angeles International Airport Friday April 8,2011. The Russian cargo planes will carry the massive pumps from airports in Atlanta and Los Angeles to Japan to spray cooling water on reactors at the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.


I've added a notation to this image. LOL. Sorry Putzmeister.



Company personnel walk around a 95-ton Putzmeister concrete pumper to be deliver to Japan at Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport on April 8, 2011, in Atlanta, Georgia. A Russian cargo plane will transport the 95-ton concrete pumper to assist in the cooling down efforts of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.



edit on 4/9/11 by makeitso because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:05 AM
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Concise info regarding world wide reactions to Fukushima, including N.Korea.


International reaction to Fukushima I nuclear accidents

International humanitarian flight undergoes radioactive decontamination

The international reaction to 2011 Fukushima I nuclear accidents has been diverse and widespread. Many inter-governmental agencies are responding to the Fukushima I nuclear accidents, often on an ad hoc basis. Many countries have advised their nationals to leave Tokyo, citing the risk associated with the nuclear plants' ongoing accident. Stock prices of many energy companies reliant on nuclear sources have dropped, while renewable energy companies have increased dramatically in value. There has been a significant re-evaluation of existing nuclear power programs in many countries. Increased anti-nuclear sentiment has been evident in Germany, Spain, Taiwan, and the United States.



Regulatory agencies

Many inter-governmental agencies are responding, often on an ad hoc basis. Responders include International Atomic Energy Agency, World Meteorological Organization and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, which has radiation detection equipment deployed around the world.[1]

Some scientists say that the 2011 Japanese nuclear accidents have revealed that the nuclear industry lacks sufficient oversight, leading to renewed calls to redefine the mandate of the IAEA so that it can better police nuclear power plants worldwide.[2] There are several problems with the IAEA says Najmedin Meshkati of University of Southern California:

It recommends safety standards, but member states are not required to comply; it promotes nuclear energy, but it also monitors nuclear use; it is the sole global organization overseeing the nuclear energy industry, yet it is also weighed down by checking compliance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).[2]

en.wikipedia.org...

Des
edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:11 AM
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I was sure that reactor 1 went critical when I saw the 100Sv/h reading. That looks like one of those top values so the actual dose rate is even higher. But still, it doesn't have to come from criticality: I realized that when I saw that the measurement was from the drywell beneath the reactor. So a "normal" subcritical meltdown explains the reading when the corium starts to affect the radiation censor directly. (Those should last a few explosions and earthquakes as they are supposed to work inside a reactor, I just wonder how they obtain the reading with so many electrical systems down.)

Funny part is that the nitrogen with a low heat capacity would've made this happen! Probably the nozzle it was injected from was used to inject water previously, hampering the cooling even further just to avoid hydrogen explosion, witch would most likely have occurred already if it was going to happen. So the US engineer wanted to be the wiseguys and gave this nitrogen-suggestion which TEPCO followed.

It could be actual criticality still, but then we would see some gigawatt of heat and a plenty of steam and smoke. The mist that appeared at the same time in TEPCO webcam and the cencorship on NHK doesn't make it easier to decide which scenario happened. My opinion is still the same kind of meltdown as in number 2 and 3. I would estimate a subcritical molten core to give out 10-100 MW of heat. Altought the chain reaction is decaying, there's still enough spontaneus fission to keep it going.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Mike wrote:


Well, as far as I know all material that is created and broadcast/telecast is technically copyright, but I'm not sure if that's what you mean by "copy written". Were you thinking in terms of "scripted", for example?


Yes, I understand what you are saying. What I was trying to say, in my own widdle way, was. All news stories used in media, are used with the understanding that the "source" of the story, is given credit in exchange for right to air.

If the "source" has put out info, not to the media, but to other agencies, the "source" can limit use of their info by media outlets.

Hope I'm saying this right...I'm much better at describing pictures I "see" in my widdle head
What I "see" at Fukushima, is hurtful to look at.

Des



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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I don't believe I have seen this posted here yet but there is a video showing some of the wave impact on the Fukushima site: LINK

The impact appears higher than the reactor building!



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical
...
A bit more on topic:

I've been thinking a bit about finding earthquake specific damage at the plant and I think I have found some:



Yellow circled areas indicate places where I believe the concrete damage can be attributed directly to the earthquake rather than the tsunami or explosions, though there is still a good possibility that it was the tsunami which created the indicated cracks as this area is much closer to the ocean.

In the photo be low you will see a few other areas of note. First is the yellow circled area which corresponds with the portion of that has two yellow circles in the above image. Why does the below image show a large water-stained area and the above image does not?

Next you will notice something in the water marked by a red circle(which another poster had called out some number of pages back, sorry I forget which one of you did). I think it looks very similar to the top of the building that I have indicated with a turquoise circle. Although I don't know how possible if would be for a building to be washed back into the ocean fully intact though I suppose stranger things have happened.



All I can say after spending a fair amount of time closely examining the hi-res photos is that I don't think that there was a single system near the water that wasn't damaged in some way if not outright utterly destroyed. And what the tsunami didn't wreck, the explosions more than made a mess of.

Anyway, since new news is as abundant as hen's teeth, I thought I would post these observations. I'm not sure how relevant they are at this point (likely not much) but here they are for your consideration.

The photo you posted is not Fukushima Dai-ichi. I checked Fukushima Dai-ni and it's not that one either.

The coast of Japan is littered with reactors, so I guess it's yet another damaged power station that we haven't been told about.

I wonder if anyone knows just how many reactors in Japan are damaged and unsafe now.



posted on Apr, 9 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Sharing...

I believe this is a link to the latest thermal imaging. Got to run so don't have time to embed for review. A little help? Thanks all!

trying again - thermal imaging

edit on 9-4-2011 by DancedWithWolves because: (no reason given)



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