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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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Also, this South Korean picture looks significant.

Becquerel/liter and a mSv reading; Iodine 131 mentioned...

photo.media.daum.net/photogallery/foreign/japan_earthquake_02/view.html?photoid=5414&newsid=20110404161515814&p=yonhap





posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 09:51 AM
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It's high time, for other countries, to shine the light of truth, in the real readings of radiation levels...No more being an uninvolved bystander. There is too much at stake here. Who cares about "saving face" for one nation, out of many.
We are quickly moving in the direction of saving a planet.

This should be a WAKE UP call to the whole damn world.


Japan Nuke Plant Operator to Dump Radioactive Water Into Ocean

Read more: www.foxnews.com...


TOKYO – The operator of Japan's stricken Fukushima nuclear plant said Monday it planned to dump thousands of tons of radioactive water into the Pacific, as the government was accused of covering up the extent of radiation levels.

"We have no choice but to release water tainted with radioactive materials into the ocean as a safety measure," Yukio Edano, the government’s chief spokesman

Read more: www.foxnews.com...



A crack in a maintenance pit found over the weekend was the latest confirmation that radioactivity continues to spill into the environment. The leak is a symptom of the primary difficulty at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex: Radioactive water is pooling around the plant and preventing workers from powering up cooling systems needed to stabilize dangerously vulnerable fuel rods.

Engineers have turned to a host of improvised and sometimes bizarre methods to tame the nuclear plant after it was crippled in Japan's magnitude 9.0 quake and tsunami on March 11. Efforts over the weekend to clog the leak with a special polymer, sawdust and even shredded newspapers failed to halt the flow at a cracked concrete maintenance pit near the shoreline.

Suspecting they might be targeting the wrong channel to the pit, workers tried to see if they could trace the leak's pathway by dumping into the system several pounds of salts used to give bathwater a milky hue, plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Monday.

"There could be other possible passages that the water may be traveling. We must watch carefully and contain it as quickly as possible," said Hidehiko Nishiyama, a spokesman for the Nuclear Safety and Industrial Agency.

Read more: www.foxnews.com...


This is no longer an isolated problem...it's a world wide problem. I don't remember seeing Japan on my voting ballot. How dare they make such a monumental decision, that affects me and mine. Shikata ga nai, is no longer acceptable.


Des
edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)

edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)

edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)

edit on 03/28/2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by MedievalGhost
 

Well I wonder how many Japanese defects will be deemed normal or attributable to either Fukishima, Horoshima or Nagasaki?

Natural deformities are more common than we think. In the west we tend to hide the probability of some of the more usual defects. But I think some are common due to cell division (partial congenital twins) others not so much.

For example

abcnews.go.com...


Van Heest estimated that one out of 200,000 babies are born with two thumbs on one hand and one out of 2 million have doubling at the wrist, resulting in two hands.

To decide which extremity to remove, doctors usually wait until the child is six to 12 months old to perform any surgery, as they want to observe which extremity the child favors and uses more, Van Heest said.


Going on his estimation should be around 65 births a year with two hands on one wrist.

www.wholesomewords.org...


World Birth/Death Rates (2009 est.)1

Birth Rate: Death Rate:
20 births/1,000 population 8 deaths/1,000 population
128.9 million births per year 53.4 million people die each year
353,015 births per day 146,357 people die each day
14,709 births each hour 6098 people die each hour
245 births each minute 102 people die each minute
4 births each second of every day almost 2 people die each second


It will be difficult to prove defects or cancer as a result of radioactive dna damage unless they increase by a substantial degree.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by zenzen
 


The OP was in regards to the pipe moving due to additional explosive occurrences or perhaps earthquake activity which would in turn point to further reactor/building damages.

If it was moved by design then this scenario would not apply.

I am trying to address those issues.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by SFA437
reply to post by zenzen
 


The OP was in regards to the pipe moving due to additional explosive occurrences or perhaps earthquake activity which would in turn point to further reactor/building damages.

If it was moved by design then this scenario would not apply.

I am trying to address those issues.

I am wondering if the section of pipe may have been moved in order to get that piece of equipment(visible in the second pic) maneuvered into the spot that it is in.

Not sure what it is, looks like a backhoe or something.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:17 AM
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What about using a nuclear weapon to blast a large circular chamber into bedrock, fused rock/glass lined in the process, then spray a flexible radiation proof polymer coating (incase of earthquakes etc) then inject waste reactor water into it. At least it stops it getting into the sea until a more permanent solution can be made up. And not like the nuclear blast (if done correctly) would vent any noticeably higher amount of radiation compared to the melted reactor fuel. Sure a 3.5 richter blast may cause some localised damage but placement is key here.

Tesla style technology capable of quantum/scalar engineering of the corium mass, other radioactive sources and particles may have to be released/fined tuned/used to really sort this mess out. But that's the golden rabbit out of the hat then, the massive catch 22.The elites' bunkers and repair systems are likely not designed to last 1,000,000 years plus in case of a large scale plutonium release, they'd have to jump ship; the stakes are higher than just us pawns and it will be very interesting to watch the movements of key players, puppets and control structures.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by jjjtir
 


In trying to put these readings into perspective I did a little math, using 0.5 uSv/hr as a rough number for Tokyo today. Assuming it takes a while to close the leakage at the plants:

0.5 uSv/hr x 24 hr/day x 365 day/yr x 1 mSv/1000 uSv x 100 mrem/mSv = 438 mrem/yr
(u=micro, 10^-6)

From table A2 (pdf) Wikipedia Link the following scenarios for dosage:


66 mrem Average yearly dose to people in the United States from human-made sources
100 mrem Annual limit of dose from all DOE facilities to a member of the public who
is not a radiation worker
110 mrem Average occupational dose received by U.S. commercial radiation workers in 1980
244 mrem Average dose from an upper gastrointestinal diagnostic X-ray series
300 mrem Average yearly dose to people in the United States from all sources of natural
background radiation


CPM/Geiger-Mueller meters don't take into account the Q and N factors that account for the type of radiation received and the area of the body where received. So uSv and mrem can go up depending on the type of isotopes in the fallout and wheter they are ingested or not.

The yearly dosage may come down due to wind shifts, and a miracle may occur and they stop all leaks tomorrow. But right now the dosage is pretty high IMO for being so far from the reactors.

This may have been covered earlier in the thread, but I wanted an immediate perspective on what is going on in Tokyo today. Those meter readings should be verifiable by someone else who is in Tokyo now, I'm sure somebody else has a meter. Would be nice to see the calibration certificate next to the meter with a calibration seal on the device.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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I guess this plan got lost somewhere between the truck load of cement dump, and the paper mache patch...


Pontoon to hold Japan nuke plant water
Updated: 05:37, Saturday April 2, 2011
Pontoon to hold Japan nuke plant water

The operator of Japan's disaster-stricken nuclear power plant plans to use a huge steel floating structure to contain radioactive water it releases.

The pontoon-type structure which can hold a maximum of 18,000 tonnes of water will be handed over to Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) by its owner which has been using it as a floating park for anglers, officials said on Friday.

Called a 'Mega-Float', it measures 136 metres long, 46 metres wide and three metres high and can hold up to 10,000 tonnes of water without sinking. It is owned by the Pacific coast city of Shimizu southwest of Tokyo.

'We've decided to provide it to the TEPCO because we want to help evacuees come back as soon as possible,' Shimizu mayor Zenkichi Kojima told reporters.

The Maga-Float will be moored off the Fukushima Daiichi plant where emergency workers have been battling to prevent a nuclear meltdown.


Guess the Pacific Ocean is cheaper in the Tepco cost analysis...

I have no mouth, and I must scream...

Des



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by SFA437

Originally posted by 00nunya00
Bringing this forward because it kind of got lost in the debate on the last page, and I'd like to discuss if this really does indicate the pics are from different times, or if there are ideas why/how that big@ss pipe got moved? I don't see a door there in side-angle photos or anything they'd need to access, so I'd rule out it being moved by people with heavy equipment. So what's it all about?

I originally noticed this when trying to find confirmation of Redneck's proposed crack in the bedrock under #4 and #3, and thought maybe if it was laying over that crack, maybe it got moved by a widening/heightening, but I couldn't find good evidence of a crack (shadows, yes....crack? Too hard to tell for sure).


Originally posted by 00nunya00
I have reason to think these photographs were taken at radically different times, or right before and after another big aftershock:






Both are from the same 3-30 set in the same zip file. But clearly, something happened to that HUGE pipe laying next to #3. How could it have happened so quickly with no evidence of activity around it, ie: planning to move it?


Again- playing catch up but some quick off-the-cuff observations:

The small section of pipe at the bottom did not move- it is still in place.

There seems to be a piece of heavy machinery to the left edge in the second photo.

I haven't STUDIED the pics, just kind of glanced at them so this isn't definitive but food for thought and debate


It seems to me that the piece of heavy equipment is covered in blast debris. So t is probably there before the explosion.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical

Originally posted by SFA437



OK, I see what you're saying - a little bit clearer now.

As also pointed out by jadedANDcynical, it's covered in blast debris. If you look carefully at the file in the set: aerial-2011-3-30-0-20-7.jpg you'll see the yellow crane (?) behind the tower and the pipe in its 20 Mar (as we have it) position. I think we can say the yellow crane is not involved with moving the pipe.
edit on 4-4-2011 by zenzen because: (no reason given)

edit on 4-4-2011 by zenzen because: need some sleep



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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Good morning everyone.


Originally posted by 00nunya00
I have reason to think these photographs were taken at radically different times, or right before and after another big aftershock:






Both are from the same 3-30 set in the same zip file. But clearly, something happened to that HUGE pipe laying next to #3. How could it have happened so quickly with no evidence of activity around it, ie: planning to move it?


I believe what we are looking at is the result of workers laying power cables. I am basing this off of two things:
  • That pipe was not moved by any type of shaking. In the first pic it is simply separated from the elbow, but in the lower it has moved in an angular fashion. The damage at the bottom indicates it was partially buried under falling debris, which would make it difficult to move.

  • Notice the cable tray running just below and to the side of the loose section of pipe. n the first pic, it is damaged. In the second pic it is still damaged some, but also appears to have been uncovered to some degree and some of the damage repaired. It looks indicative of a rapidly-executed repair, with little attention paid to surroundings and the main thrust to get the job done as quickly as possible.

Oh, and the boom to the left in the second pic is from some sort of track-hoe or backhoe that could have been used to move the pipe into its current position.

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 



It seems to me that the piece of heavy equipment is covered in blast debris. So t is probably there before the explosion.
Now that you mention it, I would have to agree.

Looking at the two pics, it seems like a lot of debris has changed positions. Seems like the buildings are deteriorating rather quickly, I wonder if we may be seeing the results of small wall and ceiling collapses? There are probably chunks of concrete falling from the remains of the walls, hitting things below them on the ground.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 



I believe what we are looking at is the result of workers laying power cables.

God help them poor bustards if they are working that close to that highly radioactive, falling down building. I had one of our young mechanics come into my office this morning and ask if I had heard how much some companies are paying to go over and work at the accident site... he is actually pondering the idea!
I did notice what looks a lot like a pair of discarded green gloves to the right and just above the 90 degree elbow on the pipe, but I don't know the scale... they are probably too big to be gloves.


edit on 4-4-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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reply to post by mistafaz

Dear God.. Does this mean that the entire bedrock underneath the entire plant is compromised?

That's what I am saying now. Not only is the bedrock cracked, but we have missing radiation sources... it is becoming painfully obvious that there is no corium inside Unit #3... so where is it? Corium doesn't just disappear.

I still think it's sitting in a pool of magma inside the bedrock, being cooled through convection currents of seawater through those cracks. Of course, that would mean it is also radiating all that seawater while the hairless monkeys on the surface are filling insignificant surface cracks with sawdust and shredded newspaper to stop water leaks.


My apologies to all monkeys everywhere for that metaphor.

(Oh, and as for those pressure readings on Reactor #3... those are sensor readings. I wonder how those sensors are expected to be anywhere near accurate lying underneath all that rubble after a double explosion, repeated high radiation readings, and heat high enough to cause the building to continue to slowly crumble before our eyes?)

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by butcherguy

Judging by the size of the hoe, those are either 36" or 42" pipes, and I am going with 36".

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:20 AM
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I think the following link might show the psychotic disconnect with reality which is apparently occurring in the minds of the TEPCO Bigwigs:

TEPCO to drop plan to add 2 reactors at Fukushima nuclear plant


The vice president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Monday that the company will withdraw its plan to build two more reactors at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, following its submission of the plan to the government in late March. ''We now think it is impossible to add reactors,'' Takashi Fujimoto told a television program in reference to the plan to add two more reactors to the six-reactor plant.


... "submission of the plan to the government in late March" ...

As of late March they submitted a plan to the government to build two new reactors AT FUKUSHIMA.

I am now officially done giving them the benefit of the doubt. To borrow a phrase from Douglas Adams, I think their minds are not only twisted, but actually sprained.



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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Spread of Radioactivity Update - Source: zamg.ac.at

04.05



04.06



Sor far,Tokyo is extremely lucky...



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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Here is a good sized clear photo of R3 Fukushima, pre-earth quake. Might give a bit of reference. If someone else feels so inclined, please add photo to forum, I don't know how...yet


TY, Des





posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by Destinyone

Here ya go:


Ain't it nice and shiny?

TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 4 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by butcherguy

Judging by the size of the hoe, those are either 36" or 42" pipes, and I am going with 36".

TheRedneck


Those pipes are only AIR pipes, and they are thin, not heavy. They are used to vent the insides of the plants. They go to the tall towers.
I remember Arnold Gundersen talking about them in one of his videos on Fairewinds.



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