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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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I have a question about the water culverts/vents we see discharging water directly into the ocean next to 5&6.

All along I assumed these were part of a rainwater/snow collection and disharge system around the plant that worked in the same way we use drains around our property...to direct water to an outlet pipe at the curb then into the storm sewers to be discharged into the ocean. This would make sense since they wouldn't want rainwater to accumulate around the plant nor in the surrounding soil since the bedrock is very close to the surface.

But I keep seeing references here to the reactors directly dumping water into these storm sewers. Does anyone have any info that these are in fact water discharge tubes from, I'm assuming, deradiated water/seawater used for cooling condensed water from the reactor system itself?

I apologize if I missed something earlier...




posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


thanks for that, LOL I was thinking the same thing a "nuke drill" .

this lack of knowing worries me, for all we know the soil is already being compromised and the groundwater is irradiated for that reason.

if this is dense bedrock I think the moisture in it would be chased away slowly by the heat and we wouldn't see a steam explosion until it reaches a pool of groundwater...

I am very busy right now. but it should be very easy to find the water tables in the area... to get an average depth, and also do we know where they tested the ground water?

the way things are going I am worried about a deep steam explosion causing another major quake along the fault as-well.
edit on 3/31/2011 by -W1LL because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/31/2011 by -W1LL because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:58 AM
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Cracks/gouges/fragmentation in the bedrock from the Earthquake, allowing water to seep into the ocean from the reactor being cracked at the base.

The reactor is cracked at the base, and is effecting the ground underneath, which is then being moved into the ocean via .... underground water not so much seeping but pouring into the ocean.

It doesn't have a long way to go to get out. The coast is literally on the doorstep.

Obviously, seismic is out as a way of checking this.

However, I'm pretty sure you can use thermal imaging. I am unsure if the ambient radiation from the reactors would obscure the image of the cracks in the bedrock.

Ground penetrating radar.

Inject a high-concentrate unique saline tracer into every effected reactor area. Put a resistivity tracer in the water at the coast line.


Fixes? Damn - there is a product that can be injected into such cracks. A foam injection system? Elastomers of some types have shown resistance to radiation breakdown at moderate doses. I have no idea if they'd work in these circumstances.







edit on 2011/3/31 by Aeons because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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March 31 2011 Death Knell for Tepco in the Financial World...my meager words...



TOKYO/LONDON: Tokyo Electric Power Co, the world's most indebted utility, has lost 1.93 trillion yen (100 yen = RM3.78) in market value as creditors snap up contracts to protect against default following the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

Shares in Tokyo Electric, or Tepco, have plunged 57 per cent in three days, as it battles to prevent a nuclear catastrophe at its earthquake-damaged Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant. The cost of insuring the company's debt against default has surged almost ninefold since March 11 earthquake on concern it will be harder to service net borrowings of US$88 billion (US$1 = RM3.06), more than any utility worldwide, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

"There is no bottom in sight," said Satoshi Yuzaki, Tokyo-based head of the market information department at Takagi Securities Co. "Nobody knows when or if the plants in Fukushima will ever restart. There's a possibility that they will have to deal with liability issues as well."

Tepco's nuclear generating capacity will be held back for years, forcing the company to build new stations and generate power from more costly fossil fuel plants, Moody's Investors Service Ltd said in a note to investors.

Read more: Tepco loses 1.93t yen in market value www.btimes.com.my...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


oh that is guaranteed coming, I hope the japanese still have enough honour left to execute these criminals at tepco for what they have done. Life in prison doesn't seem like enough for these folk.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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Originally posted by Procharmo

He also has bought the CEO of Areva Anne Lauvergeon with him.



Awww what a happy couple... must be everything under control eh? Now that the French are here to dismantle the reactors and make it all go away.


French Team from Areva arrived in Japan to deal with the Nuclear situation













Does not Areva make the MOX fuel?

MOX fuel assembly - Areva
www.areva.com...

Yup
edit on 31-3-2011 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


ahh good, maybe now they'll have good reason to hang themselves before the wrath of the people catches up with them.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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Dutch news..
smoke above fukujima 2...

firefighters say... no fire ...but something curios going on in the installation...........


www.nu.nl...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Black Sheep

It would leave a thermal signature, but based on what was between the camera and the corium it might be distorted quite a bit. Thermal sensors measure the same basic thing video cameras do, only at longer wavelengths. A video camera can be thwarted by an opaque object in the way, and a thermal imager can be thwarted by a thermally opaque object.

Due to the extreme amount of heat, we should see something at least, but probably not see what was happening clearly.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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Originally posted by ressiv
Dutch news..
smoke above fukujima 2...

firefighters say... no fire ...but something curios going on in the installation...........


www.nu.nl...


this is exactly why I have had this feeling. what is left to burn if its through the concrete and steel barriers the ground. I hope i am wrong but i think we are at that stage...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Black Sheep

It would leave a thermal signature, but based on what was between the camera and the corium it might be distorted quite a bit. Thermal sensors measure the same basic thing video cameras do, only at longer wavelengths. A video camera can be thwarted by an opaque object in the way, and a thermal imager can be thwarted by a thermally opaque object.

Due to the extreme amount of heat, we should see something at least, but probably not see what was happening clearly.

TheRedneck


Agreed - I believe some data is better then no data. Even better, getting independent data.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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Sirs-

I've had some more time to look at the hi-res photo and want to make an addendum.

The red arrows are indeed indicating force applied but it is reflected force, a kind of wraparound. The same kind of damage wrecked the rear of the Ishtar Sheraton Hotel in Baghdad. A massive truck bomb went off in front and the rear of the building sustained the most damage.

An overpressure front acts in air just like a tsunami does in water. When it hits something it does not necessarily refract and the wavefront but can combine and cause damage on the opposite side.

I think that #3 went high order and the wave was reflected off the turbine building, retained 10psi+ and struck the side of #3 after it was structurally weakened and shoved the whole side inwards.

The holes in the turbine building are definitively pre-explosion in regards to #3.

Sorry I wasn't on top of this last night but it was a kind of "off the cuff" 5 minute analysis. I'll stand behind this one 110% as being accurate.



I'm still trying to wrap my head around this though....





I have no explanation for it whatsoever. None.
edit on 31-3-2011 by SFA437 because: Coffee does not ensure lack of typographical errors




posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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reply to post by -W1LL
 

sorry not nr2 reactor of fukajima 1...
but an reactor at the other plant in fukajima !!!!!

www.nu.nl...




edit on 31-3-2011 by ressiv because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 



Nobody knows when or if the plants in Fukushima will ever restart.

www.btimes.com.my...

I can't believe there are people in Japan that actually think there is a chance that the plants will restart at some point. The reality is they will have to be abandoned and entombed. Nobody will be able to live around there for a very long time. These people are in denial.



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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World tries to protect Japanese people, Japanese nuclear officials thumb nose to save face and avoid looking bad to PTB by compromising the propaganda cone of silence and prompting realistic and justified concern, as well as difficult questions that can't be answered, among residents of Tokyo.

www3.nhk.or.jp...

Nuclear watchdog defends its decision

Japan's nuclear safety watchdog says it sees no reason to change the zone for which the government advised residents to stay indoors or evacuate voluntarily.

The Nuclear Safety Commission made the remark to reporters on Thursday, following reports by the IAEA that radiation levels twice as high as its criterion for evacuation were detected in soil at a village outside the zone.

Commission member Seiji Shiroya said evacuation criteria in Japan are decided according to how much radiation people would be exposed to, not radiation levels in the ground. He said the IAEA's findings should be used as references, but that the commission's decision on the zone is correct.

Shiroya said the commission studies various factors, including radiation levels in the air and amounts of airborne radioactive substances taken into the body through breathing and eating.

He said the IAEA probably measured radiation on a grass surface with available equipment, but that he believes the commission's figures are more accurate when considering the effect on the human body.

Thursday, March 31, 2011 19:37 +0900 (JST)



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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Breaking News
Send in the Marines


US has dispatched special forces group.. 104 member team





USMC Chemical-Biological Incident Response Force (CBIRF)



www.specialoperations.com...



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical

(replying due to u2u request)

I'm really not sure if that is the reactor itself or not... the top does look like it, and the scale is about right, but there are some variations in the vessel underneath that that do not line up. These could be due to damage to the vessel or to various debris items in the shot. Does anyone remember which reactor this was a photo of?

I'll say this: if that is the RPV... oh crap.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by SFA437
 


That explains peefectly why some of the building panels that are still lodged in the side facing the turbine buildig are recessed into the structure rather than all being forced outward.
edit on 31-3-2011 by jadedANDcynical because: Typo



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


LOL what a joke. rifles and Cammo. what exactly do they think they are going to do?



posted on Mar, 31 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 



yes, you are right, that's the top of the containment vessel at n.4, as confirmed in this video (at 2.15) by the expert from tokyo university.

he also says it's difficult to believe that the explosion itself could have dislodged the lid


edit on 31-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-3-2011 by monica86 because: (no reason given)




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