Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by jackflap

Indications are that they are dumping it.... and I would expect a huge amount of it is released as steam. But I really am not sure... all I know is the report above that they are using firehoses to conduct the water.

It is possible that they are using seawater in the secondary cooling loop instead of the primary, and if so, the steam/runoff would not be highly radioactive. The reactors are not wide open, so that's probably what is going on.

TheRedneck




posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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CNN just said they are rolling-out "Bill Nye the Science Guy" to "explain how close" the situation is to being disastrous? WTF?


PS: I have nothing against Bill. He's great for explaining science stuff to laymen, etc. But, CNN really needs to be rolling-on SME's ("subject-matter-experts") for this stuff - not generalists.


edit on 2011-3-13 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


didn't really understand your answer , so your saying all of the water being used is being released in steam ? and not being put back in the ocean ?



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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fox interviewd a radiation expert he says the radiation is coming herfe in trace amounts no danger to hawaii he is not worried YET he is more worried for tokyo if the wind changes direction it is blowing south now



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord

A working reactor runs ideally at 250°C. Uranium melts at about 3000°C. Water turns to steam at 100°C.

So yes, there will be some steam. That is actually what the reactor produces normally to turn the turbines. As long as the steam is not coming from inside the reactor vessel itself, it shouldn't be a big deal. At this point, it appears that they are using the heat exchangers inside the reactor vessel to cool it, not just spraying a pile of liquid uranium with a firehose.


If you ever see steam coming from inside a reactor... that is not a good thing, and not something that people discuss calmly.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by GullibleUnderlord
reply to post by TheRedneck
 


didn't really understand your answer , so your saying all of the water being used is being released in steam ? and not being put back in the ocean ?


The temp during a meltdown can reach about 6,000 degrees. Lots of evaporation, and steam.
edit on 13-3-2011 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


so to be exact no water that gets pumped in stays water all turned into steam ?
edit on 13-3-2011 by GullibleUnderlord because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord

The big worry for Japan right now appears to be radioactive iodine release (I-131). That is some nasty stuff! It emits high amounts of beta and gamma radiation (beta ionizes anything that absorbs it and gamma is like running a microwave with the case off), but it also has a 8-day half-life. It will dissipate pretty rapidly in other words. They have had an I-131 release, which is why they are issuing iodine pills...

I may have just confused everyone... normal iodine is harmless and actually an essential chemical in the body. I-131 tends to get absorbed just like stable iodine, so in order to dilute any I-131 absorbed, they give large amounts of stable iodine.

... anyway, to continue... if there is rainwater contamination, that is either iodine or neutron emission... and it is neutron emission that is a concern for the US in the event of a large release. I am sure there has been some neutron release, but so far it appears to be pretty minor. Any large-scale neutron release will not be something that can be covered up.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Here's more info on that other (non-Tepco) nuclear plant ...

It's the "Tokai Nunclear Plant" (Wikipedia Page, company web-site page), run by "Japan Atomic Power Company" (Wikipedia Page, company web-site).

It has two reactors, that appear to be from two different generations of construction (mid-1960's and late 1970's).

Here's their press release ...
Press-Release (PDF in Japanese)
Press-Release (Google-Translated to English)

It basically implies that they did have an issue with their cooling system, but were able to shut things down with a backup system.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:57 PM
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Risks Remain At Japanese Nuclear Plants
IAEA Says Radiation Levels Normal At 1 Plant

POSTED: Sunday, March 13, 2011
UPDATED: 7:34 pm EDT March 13, 2011

TOKYO -- The International Atomic Energy Agency said on Sunday that radioactivity levels at the Onagawa nuclear power plant had returned to normal background levels.

However, government said the level of radiation at a second troubled nuclear plant has exceeded the legal limit, underscoring the continuing problems with reactors rattled by Friday's massive earthquake and the ensuing tsunami.


Smoke ascends over an industrial area as flames are seen in Sendai, northern Japan, Saturday, March 12, 2011

Link

Update in the last half hour, hope the levels are returned to normal..
edit on 13-3-2011 by Aquarius1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord

Well, maybe not all of it, but a large part will be steam. It depends on just how operational that secondary cooling system is; it contains huge condensers that turn the steam back into water for recirculation and cooling of the reactor. If those condensers are being used, then it might be mostly water by the time it is reclaimed.

Sorry I can't get more specific, but it depends on what adjustments have been made in order to facilitate cooling. This thing is not running according to initial design specs. They are playing it by ear.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


thanks for the input , i hope they do not return any of that used water
back into the sea



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by Aquarius1
 

I believe that picture is from the refinery fire - not a nuclear plant.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator
reply to post by Aquarius1
 

I believe that picture is from the refinery fire - not a nuclear plant.


Smoke ascends over an industrial area as flames are seen in Sendai, northern Japan, Saturday, March 12, 2011. Japan launched a massive military rescue operation Saturday after a giant, quake-fed tsunami killed hundreds of people and turned the northeastern coast into a swampy wasteland, while authorities braced for a possible meltdown at a nuclear reactor

Yes it is, sorry should have been more clear..


www.clickondetroit.com...


edit on 13-3-2011 by Aquarius1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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I just saw something on Jiji news about a hydrogen build-up in one of the reactors (presumably #3 at the Fukushima Daiichi plant).

[Jiji News, Google-Translated] Danger of explosion followed by hydrogen-3 rocket, the cooling water injection - the amount of radiation, the primary criterion than one o'clock Hukushima

Remember, this is Google-Translated, so forgive you please broken Engrish ...


According to NISA, the Unit 3 cooling water level gauge, the fuel rods is about 2.2 m is exposed shows. However, the injection pipe water from the fire on the follow, the furnace pressure is stable. 52-minute dose of radiation around 1:00 pm on December 13 has been declining after peaking in 1557.5 microsievert, "It's full of contradictions states" are trying to. The water level is expected to total failure, followed by exposure to a large fuel rod temporarily, it reacts with hot water to cover the zirconium fuel, hydrogen is generated. Leak in the reactor and the hydrogen reacts with oxygen in the air, that there is a risk of explosion. NISA and TEPCO So, hurry and seawater cooling the fuel rods to reduce the emission of hydrogen, to consider how removing the hydrogen accumulated in the containment. However, workers in a nuclear reactor because it is too 近Dzukezu explosion hazard, it is not clear whether the continuing evolution of hydrogen.


I'm having trouble reading that, but it sounds too me like they're going to have to try to vent some gas, and there's a risk of that causing an explosion similar to what happened with reactor #1?

PS: That's consistent with previous official statements (yesterday?) that another explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi plant was "possible".
edit on 2011-3-13 by EnhancedInterrogator because: added postscript.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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o my !! there is a storm system coming into japan and tokyo with
rainfall and later snow !! and tuesday winds expected to change and send fallout onshore !!! acording to fox weather expert , how much more can they endure ?



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:16 PM
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1
March 13, 2011
Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency

Seismic Damage Information(the 20th Release)
(As of 20:30 March 13, 2011)



Readings at monitoring posts
The measurement of radioactive materials in the environmental monitoring
area near the site boundary by a monitoring car confirmed the increase in
the radioactivity compared to the radioactivity at 04:30, March 13.
MP1 (Monitoring at North End of Site Boundary) :
17microSv/h( 11:40 March 13)
26microSv/h(18:30 March 13)MP4 (Monitoring Car at North West Site Boundary for Unit 1)
47.1microSv/h(12:20 March 13)
44microSv/h(19:33 March 13)
MP6 (Monitoring at the Main Gate)
26microSv/h(09:30 March 13)
5.2microSv/h(19:00 March 13)


www.nisa.meti.go.jp...



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:17 PM
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we have seen reports of 2 meters of fuel rods exposed and reports of difficulty in raising the level to cover them.
If the fuel rods are exposed, that indicates a loss of primary coolant. Unless the primary/secondary heat exchanger is compromised, that means that adding seawater to the secondary will not help to cover the fuel rods. If the heat exchanger is compromised, you are equally as f#*ked, because that would introduce radiation into the secondary loop.
Or not?



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:19 PM
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I think there's some more Tepco press-releases coming-up. I see on Japanese page, but not Engrish yet.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 07:22 PM
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Check the Reuters page. They have a picture up right now of a mother talking to her daughter, who was evacuated from the nuclear plant vicinity, from behind a glass window isolation area because she's shown signs of radiation.

Dang. It's up to the "cleanse/isolate/observe tons of people" point now. They're certainly downplaying this aspect.





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