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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Actually, if you followed the BP threads, it is recognized as highly mutagenic, and is what is probably killing those baby dolphins: my bet is they suffered some genetic compromise that contributed to their deaths. What is happening on the bacterial level I shudder to think of.

My firm rule for the future is :

Don't eat anything with more than three eyes.


I really, truly hope I'm joking.




posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


Sure was, I had forgotten about that. BP has a pretty good name in my town, they've paid for a lot of infrastructure improvements, a nice BIG new scoreboard for our High School football team (this is Texas you know) so when bad stuff happens further away, it's hushed up if possible.

Marathon's (not Monsanto) butane and hydrofluoric acid (was wrong about hydrogen sulfide) release last night was a level 3 event which is shelter-in-place.

I was at work when it happened, but my wife called to tell me about it. While I was on my way home I drove past the portion of the plan that had the leak, a huge thermal oxidation tower (flare) was burning and they were spraying one of the refinery towers down with a continuous spray of water. My eyes stung as soon as I got near, so I can only imagine what it would have been like before they got it "under control."

Kind of surprised me that they didn't shut down the road.

BP certainly seems to have given Tepco a few pages from it's media relations play book.


"I know the quake is the biggest in our history," Tobinaga said. "Though the government's initial response was good, when it came to secondary damages such as the nuclear power plants, it could have done a better job communicating with TEPCO, the plant's owners, as well as a better job of informing the public of what is going on."


I hope her hope is not misplaced:

"One of my friends lives in Fukushima where some of the nuclear plants failed." Yoshimoto said. "I haven't been able to check up on him, but I'm sure he is fine."




Source



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by apacheman
 


Thanks I haven't (only so much space in one head hehe), but it is my understanding that people exposed to it tend to die, but it is very much like exposure in the case of radiation in either event

edit on 28-3-2011 by Silverlok because: ending are importANT TOO



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Right on, so are those the only two substances that could---in this present situation, should it get as horrible as it could possibly get-----have any chance at all of falling out over the US? Or are there more substances that could possibly come over on a cloud and contaminate the water?

Really, what I'm going after is an oh-crap list of substances that might come from Fukushima to not want in my water, you know? Even if it got bad in a way we all know it won't
, I could distill most of the bad stuff out except for the oh-crap substances. That's the list I'm after.

ETA: or, to ask another way: can you name exactly the stuff you're worried about coming over here in that dreaded huge steam explosion?
edit on 28-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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MOX fuel fallout and effected zones 4 times larger than conventional uranium reactors

From CNIC (quoted from thread post by GoldenFleece)


The plan to burn MOX fuel in light water reactors is called the pluthermal program in Japan. In the core of a pluthermal reactor, there are ten times more actinides such as plutonium, americium, and curium than the core of a uranium reactor. Actinides cause serious internal exposure in human bodies and thus pose a very serious threat to human health. In short, exposure doses resulting from an accident at a pluthermal reactor would be twice those produced by an accident at a uranium reactor. A given exposure dose would be received by residents over twice the distance. The overall affected area would be four times larger. When fatalities by cancer from an accident at a pluthermal reactor is calculated with an assumption that Tokyo was downwind, the number of cancer fatalities would increase from 0.4 million in the case of an accident at a uranium reactor to 10.6 million. In view of such risks, MOX utilization is simply too dangerous.


edit on 28-3-2011 by Wertwog because: added source of quote



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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duplicate post (please delete)

edit on 28-3-2011 by Wertwog because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


I wouldn't say those are the only two substances, the rain will scrub any airborne particulate out of the air (as rain from the air is not "distilled" water) so you will get soluability of other molecules within the falling water -- this will scrub things like strontium, rubidium, plutonium, uranum molecules out of the air, but it will also transport these molecules via water tables and ocean currents. These molecules will again spawn other radioactive molecules, the process of dispersal and contamination is a complicated path of decay and a chain reaction of it's own. These scientists truely have no idea the zoo of radioactive elements a large scale disaster could generate, if we get an explosion from this meltdown we are going to find out the hard way and it won't be pretty. Things like radioactive chlorine are only the tip of the iceberg, and chernobyl is nothing compared to the type of destruction a mox reactor scenario can bring about.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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damn it redneck there go my vacation days AND fantasies:

the paper said that the government is examining purchasing a majority stake in Tepco, as well as bearing responsibility for paying liabilities stemming from problems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility. By taking control of the utility, the government would also be able to help ensure that Tepco has sufficient capital to maintain stable electricity supply,


LInk
people of the world : this is crime



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by Silverlok
 


To Japan: We are selling you a lemon and tepco won't be liable for a thing! In fact they'll still be building plants and operating them while you are eating three eyed fish!



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by Silverlok
damn it redneck there go my vacation days AND fantasies:

the paper said that the government is examining purchasing a majority stake in Tepco, as well as bearing responsibility for paying liabilities stemming from problems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility. By taking control of the utility, the government would also be able to help ensure that Tepco has sufficient capital to maintain stable electricity supply,


LInk
people of the world : this is crime


How are they going to afford that? Probably by calling in all the US Bonds they hold... bye bye US economic recovery!



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by TheLastStand
strontium, rubidium, plutonium, uranum molecules


Okay, we're up to six things now, and it sounds like no one knows where the list ends? Or is it that all the finite list of things that could be released will then decay into other bad things? Like I said, what I'm after is the list of things they might detect in the rainwater and air while testing for Fukushima fallout that would indicate that it's going to be emitting gamma for a while.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


well well, this has been suggested before but after the "emergency japanese banker bailouts", they would be in need for money already. Oh yeah that's a cool move, bankrupt the US and drive it into poverty, while japanese citizens get screwed by their own government because they'll make sure the victims get their due (nothing) ala g20 government style. Sweeping stuff under the carp... err... helping people across the world! yeah that's it!



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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it gets worse apparently the industry in Japan is a classic example of corruption and profiteering at it's finest;
they are "buying" a lemon:

Another radioactive leak at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant On August 2 Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL) announced the possibility that there had been a leak of a tiny amount of high-level radioactive liquid waste from the concentration equipment at its Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture. Leaked liquid was found in a stainless steel protective pipe around a thermometer that is installed inside the equipment to measure the temperature of the liquid waste. A high radiation reading was noticed near the tip the thermometer on July 30 when it was removed in order to replace it. It seems that the liquid leaked out, with some of it sticking to the thermometer. Radioactive liquid waste also leaked onto one worker, who was exposed to radiation as a result.


Link

and the culpability does begin to shine ...bye bye U.S. dollar, but who will save the day > china ..oh my my. russia ? oh oh



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:12 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


That is the thing, it is not a finite list that we know of. Sometimes radio-isotopes can exhibit novel chemical reactions versus their non radioactive counter-parts. Take everything that we don't know about the chemistry of all our industrial chemicals and rubbish, and consider these radioactive elements being released as one extra piece to the puzzle that complicates even this difficult to grasp scope of chemical reactions. And that is just one aspect of this considering we truely don't know how many radioactive elements this will create. Almost any element on the periodic table has multiple isotopes, and a fair amount of those isotopes are not stable. The only thing we get off easy on is there are a number of them that have relatively short half lives. Take everything on the periodic table and multiply it by 3 (and that's seriously low-balling the number of different elements and isotopes). This is why the science is so unpredictable... what is:
unpredictable * unpredictable = even worse. That's the best guesstimate I can come up with, there are too many variables to even consider grasping on this one.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


don't forget krypton 85, Argon-37


but remember according to some folks...radiation is good for you



nevermind you were talking about in your water
edit on 28-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00

Originally posted by TheLastStand
strontium, rubidium, plutonium, uranum molecules


Okay, we're up to six things now, and it sounds like no one knows where the list ends? Or is it that all the finite list of things that could be released will then decay into other bad things? Like I said, what I'm after is the list of things they might detect in the rainwater and air while testing for Fukushima fallout that would indicate that it's going to be emitting gamma for a while.


Here ya go, Nunya: BWR Radionucleide Inventory



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 

I too am in Vancouver. Considering a raging full-scale meltdown in 3 reactors, when do we here in Vancouver need to start preparing to move? There is no end in sight and the powerplant is going to be abandoned. The dead bodies of plankton are washing ashore on our beaches already.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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Pardon if this has been posted...

It’s 10:00 pm EDT here; - 11:00 a.m. Tuesday in Japan.

So we are down to sandbags now.

Too much water, the flow of radioactive water overflows into the ocean.

Not enough water, the reactors overheat.

The unimaginable is staved off with streams of water, and sandbags.


Sandbags. That’s right, we’re literally down to sandbags to keep a trench filled with highly radiative water from spilling its content into the sea
The concrete trench stretches toward the coast but does not connect to the sea.

Puddles of water were also found in the trenches of the No.1 and No.3 reactors.

The No.1 reactor’s trench will overflow if the water rises by 10 centimeters. TEPCO has blocked the trench outlet with sandbags and concrete to prevent the water from reaching the ocean.my.firedoglake.com...



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00

Forget trying to survive in one of those 'oh, crap' scenarios... the only way is to leave. That is why I am screaming "EVACUATE!" at Japan right now... there is no way for humans to survive a complete radioactive meltdown scenario. A few might live for a while, but everyone is going to be affected seriously healthwise.

There are probably thousands of different isotopes that can form, especially in light of the seawater that was pumped in. Your best bet for monitoring is to watch for beta and gamma emissions. They are the real problem; the alpha are rare and unexpected and the neutrons are almost undetectable in water (and their main concern is the additional radiation from them in terms of beta and gamma).

The singular thing that concerns me about a steam explosion is the water itself, not the isotopes it may carry. These isotopes can be dangerous, yes, but there is also a probability that they can be guarded against to at least some extent. Water itself cannot be guarded against.

You can take some comfort in the fact that it would take a massive steam explosion directed skyward in order to cause this concern. That is what happened at Chernobyl, although there wasn't nearly as much water to be contaminated. The explosion from the plant sent particles far up into the Jet Stream, which then scattered them across its path.

No such explosion has occurred, and if one does occur, there is a chance that the remains of the buildings will act as a shaper for the blast, sending it more horizontal than vertical. Bad for Japan, but good for everyone else... and at this point in time, bad for Japan is becoming a foregone conclusion. It's like, would you rather be shot at point plank with a shotgun or a tank? It really doesn't matter...

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 11:27 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


it is terrible but extreme times of change we do live in:


BERLIN, March 27 (Reuters) - Japan's nuclear disaster helped lift Germany's anti-nuclear Greens off the opposition benches and into the seat of power of the country's richest state on Sunday with an unprecedented surge of popularity. In a stunning victory, the Greens ousted Chancellor Angela Merkel's party in the industrial state of Baden-Wuerttemberg, which the conservatives have ruled for 58 consecutive years. The Greens also beat their traditional allies, the Social Democrats. "This is a historic turning point in Greens history," said party co-leader Claudia Roth at celebrations in Berlin after an ear-splitting cheer went out at 6 p.m. as exit polls showed the Greens had enough support to win the state premier's office.


historically these things have been snuffed out but in a dying world, the common denominator can no longer be suborned



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