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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:32 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:34 AM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


, I also believe the real story is quite different.
I was just reporting what the tv said



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:39 AM
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Sorry if this has been posted before.
An interesting interview.

Source: www.counterpunch.org...

What They're Covering Up at Fukushima.



"You Get 3,500,000 the Normal Dose. You Call That Safe? And What Media Have Reported This? None!"


edit on 28-3-2011 by Mianeye because: W



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:40 AM
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reply to post by monica86
 


Thankyou and it seems they are delaying backing up information by about two days.I hope that the translation for gutter and trench is the same word in Japanese.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:47 AM
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I went to bed dreaming about this last night, what a nightmare this situation has become. A nightmare that will affect so many lives.

One thing I thought about this morning and please forgive me as I am not a nuclear scientist. Would it be possible to tap into the cooling loop out at sea? Possibly inject some dye to see if there are are any cracks in the ocean. Then tap a couple of ports into the loop one for pressure and one for vacuum. If this loop has cracked inside the reactor, you could use it as a point of entry to inject chemicals (boron) along with fresh water?

Again forgive me if I am all wet, just trying to help.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by kismetphayze
 


What a great post. I couldn't help but Star it.
I am not currently in Japan,but I feel for those who are there. The tragedy from the Earthquake,and ensuing Tsunami were bad enough,the Nuclear situation is by far the toughest thing to fathom. From reading this thread,and those who live there,and have posted from there,it seems like life is going on as usual,albeit tempered by situation closer to the zones hardest hit. I feel for the loss of life,and most importantly,feel for the years to come,living with the thought that radiation,will ALWAYS be the norm,closest to those damaged reactors.When you said,"Before you were born, people used to live in Japan", hit me hard. Thank you for posting,and my thoughts and prayers will always be with those affected by this tragedy.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by MissTiger
 


NHK was calling the U shape thing a "trench", I don't know why, I think it's more like a gutter



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:00 AM
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Okay, another small update. Been watching the TV and there is still ongoing coverage of the situation. Its mainly retrospective analysis, there haven't been any breaking news announcements--at least on this "NHK G" channel I'm watching. The last two stories:

1) slow relocation of tsunami victims. I did not cath if they from near the nuclear plant though.
2) something about TEPCO subcontractors now working at the nuclear plant.

I am in nihonbashi right now. Went out to get food from a nearby convenience store and there was still bottled water stocked. Although, a family friend in yokohama said that a convenience store nearby his house had run out of bottled water a day or two ago.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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Originally posted by Mianeye
Sorry if this has been posted before.
An interesting interview.

Source: www.counterpunch.org...

What They're Covering Up at Fukushima.



"You Get 3,500,000 the Normal Dose. You Call That Safe? And What Media Have Reported This? None!"


edit on 28-3-2011 by Mianeye because: W


For example, yesterday. Around Fukushima Daiichi Station they measured 400 millisieverts – that’s per hour. With this measurement (Chief Cabinet Secretary) Edano admitted for the first time that there was a danger to health, but he didn’t explain what this means. All of the information media are at fault here I think. They are saying stupid things like, why, we are exposed to radiation all the time in our daily life, we get radiation from outer space. But that’s one millisievert per year. A year has 365 days, a day has 24 hours; multiply 365 by 24, you get 8760. Multiply the 400 millisieverts by that, you get 3,500,000 the normal dose. You call that safe? And what media have reported this? None.



Wow,just wow!



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00
This is an astute observation to take note of:


Many experts have shied away from describing worst-case outcomes, which are terrifying to contemplate and risky to mention. The risk isn’t just panicking the public. Crying wolf can threaten one’s expert status.


Bloomburg

Hearty applause for our "thread experts" who are braver than most to not only explain what the most possible outcomes may be, but also why they might happen so we aren't completely dependent on the official warnings of those who may not hold our best interests above their own reputations. This whole situation is degrading quickly in the last day or two.


I would like to point to some link, where some russian nuclear specialists talk at :
forum.atominfo.ru...

Of course its in russian, but Chrome does a nice auto translation of it. They have some good links there too.

The main page of atominfo.ru isnt too bad either.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by monica86
 


They are saying on NHK it is an observation trench, there are pipes down there, sounds like it's very large. Their trench is very different to a gutter but I'm just hoping it was translated wrong on the live conference. They are saying they have to drain the water from the trench but have to first drain the water from the turbine room.

nhk

In the UK we have observation chambers/trenches sealed with manhole covers but these are not 100% water tight. We tend to dig deeper than the depth of the pipes and backfill with gravel to help with drainage into the water table from rain water. If it's a very large observation trench it should have some form of flooring such as concrete which should then have it's own drainage system.

edit on 28/3/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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Fumiaki Nakayama speaking on NHK about the workers that were sent to hospital said


no raditaion contamintation was found in thier bodies, symtoms that may develop now may be red spots that will not require treatment


NHK



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by sallamy
 


Confusing figures again - I think Tepco are using them to their advantage.


1 millisieverts (mSv) = 1,000 microsievert (uSv)

1,000 millisieverts (mSv) = 1,000,000 microsievert (uSv)


So if the figures are correct, 1,000 millisieverts (msv) per hour is a very high figure. If we refer to this Radiation Dose Chart, 1,000 millisieverts (msv) per hour will give you severe radiation poisoning (and a good chance of death) within 2 hours.

In comparison, Greenpeace's figures may seem low, however exposure to inhabitants in these areas could add up to significant amounts, if levels remain the same over time.

10 microsieverts (usv) per hour, in a village 40 km away, is comparable to radiation levels from a chest x-ray every 2 hours.

If these figure remained consistent...
24 hours = 240 microsieverts (usv)
4.2 days = 1 millisieverts (msv)
1 week = 1.7 millisieverts (msv)
30 days = 7.2 millisieverts (msv)
1 year = 86.4 millisieverts (msv)

50 millisieverts (msv) per year is the limit of exposure for US radiation workers.
100 millisieverts (msv) per year is the dose clearly linked to increased cancer risk.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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Swedish authorities has started monitoring incoming goods from Japan. It is based on spot-check principle and food and cosmetics are the top priority but other goods is also measured. Results has not been reported yet as the monitoring started on Sunday 27 of Mars 2011 (Swedish time). The source the Swedish radiation safety agency, in Swedish but you can use google translate:
www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se...

Here are readings from Iodine-131 found in air in Sweden:
www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se...
note that readings are in millibecquerel/cubicmeter of air (mBq/m3)

Here are readings from the Finnish radiation monitoring network. Measurements are background in Finland level in uSv/hour:
www.stuk.fi...

The relatively high interest in Fukushima accident in Scandinavia is partly because of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Fallout of Iodine and Cesium over Scandinavia contaminated the ground. The "safe" level of Cesium-137 level in reindeer meat was raised from 300 Becquerel/kg to 1500 Becquerel/kg after the Chernobyl accident because not a single reindeer with the lower reading was found. Still today in 2011 many reindeer and other food has so high levels of Cesium-137 that they need to be buried under ground.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by sallamy
 

I'd like to thank you and others who have posted on the matter of water leaking into this tunnel outside of the reactors.

I also watched the NHK report and as it was stated by the expert (and relayed via the interpreter), the "trench" that is shown in some graphics that have been posted also includes an electric cabling service tunnel. It also contains "pipes". I'm not sure if they mean electrical conduit pipes or some other types of pipes. The graphic shows a cross-section through that trench, with the tunnel being inside the trench.

The information I got from the NHK report was:
-- the trench under discussion runs along the outside of reactors 1, 2 & 3. I suspect it may run alongside all six reactors but #4, 5 & 6 were not mentioned;
-- the service tunnel is about 2 metres in height and is large enough for people to walk through it, to inspect the electrical cabling and pipes that are housed within it.;
-- this tunnel and the trench are not connected directly to the reactor buildings;
-- pipes from the tunnel (inside the trench) run through the walls of the reactor buildings;
-- the trench and tunnel do not normally contain any water;
-- highly contaminated water has been found in the trench outside the #2 reactor building;
-- the contaminated water inside the #2 building was measured yesterday at more than 1,000 millisieverts/hour;
-- the contaminated water inside the trench has also been measured at more than 1,000 millisieverts/hour at the water's surface;
-- the expert says it therefore appears that water from the #2 reactor building has leaked into the trench/tunnel;
-- this leakage could have occurred if the mortar around the pipes going into the building (from the service trench/tunnel) were damaged by the quake. (Note: possibly "seals" or "sealant" might have been a better term than "mortar" but I am guessing here. Just my observation of what could have been meant.);
-- the water in the tunnel was only 10 cm (4 inches) from the top at its inspection entrance;
-- this water had risen in height by 5 cm in the previous two hours;
-- it is now not known if the water has since overflowed from this place and gone into the sea;
-- the earthquake may have loosened valves in the reactor. (I think they mean in the reactor cooling system);
-- the solution to stopping the leak is to pump the flooded water out of the reactor building.

SUMMARY (My own)
It has been previously acknowledged by TEPCO that #2 reactor's core is melting and that some of its radioactive material has contaminated water in the cooling system. Those contaminants are therefore likely to include Pu-239, even though TEPCO seems reluctant to discuss this.

This water is now apparently leaking out of the reactor building into the service trench/tunnel and has flooded this part of the facility. Obviously this is not good for electrical cables that were laid in an environment that is supposed to remain dry.

People cannot enter this service tunnel/trench because it's flooded. Therefore, without radiation-proof diving equipment (does such a thing even exist?), they cannot access the damaged pipe connections into the reactor building from that side. There is therefore no obvious way to fix the leak/s from outside (ie within the trench or tunnel). Pumping the flood water out of the reactor building will require somewhere to store it, unless they intend to pump it into the sea.

To my knowledge there has been no information about exactly what they intend to do with any water they pump out to prevent it entering the environment.

Finally, as I couldn't find this complete interview in printed form, I can only give the link to NHK. They tend to recycle these reports every few hours so it should be possible to catch it.

EDIT: to clarify, the reports are now saying** that the water in the trench probably came from reactor #2's turbine building -- meaning not from the reactor building.

EXTRA Edit: ** It could be that they said this all along and I just didn't catch it. (End of extra edit.)

However, that confirms what Redneck and others have said previously: the reactor's water is contaminated with/by material from the melting core and this has then travelled into the turbine building and leaked from there. I know that might sound obvious to anyone who's followed the thread, but as we doubtless have new people reading this every day it's worth saying again.

Mike
edit on 28/3/11 by JustMike because: eta and typos

edit on 28/3/11 by JustMike because: added extra edit



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by MissTiger
Fumiaki Nakayama speaking on NHK about the workers that were sent to hospital said


no raditaion contamintation was found in thier bodies, symtoms that may develop now may be red spots that will not require treatment


NHK


Wonder if they will grant any interviews on what they found? Oh...wait....Dead men tell no tales. That breaking news holds about as much water as reactors #2 and #3.



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by comawhite12
 


They have been released from hospital, first independant reporter to get to them wins!



Exposed workers okay Three men exposed to high levels of radiation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have left the hospital with a clean bill of health. The 3 workers left the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba Prefecture on Monday. They had been receiving special medical treatment after having been exposed to radiation while installing power cables at the Number 3 reactor complex on Thursday. Two of the men stood in radioactive water for about 2 hours. They were due to receive treatment for burns, but doctors at the institute found that this was not necessary. The institute says the level of their exposure was up to 3,000 millisieverts, less than initially thought. The 2 men reportedly show no symptoms of burns, and their internal organs were exposed to very low levels of radiation. The institute says the third man also has no symptoms. The 3 men will undergo checks at the institute in several days' time. Doctor Fumiaki Nakayama of the institute says that even if the men do develop symptoms, they do not need treatment, and the symptoms will eventually disappear.


NHK
edit on 28/3/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by MissTiger
 


For my understanding. Did you suspect that the analysis of the trench broadcasted today might relate to a news conference given 2 days ago in which they talked about a "gutter"?



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 09:08 AM
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reply to post by monica86
 


Yes but there has been too many arguments on this thread and I was not about to post something where I had no evidence to back it up. It is too easy for someone to just say they heard something without evidence. We have already lost some good posters without me starting an argument.

They said there was a witness that had seen water in a "gutter". It was only said once and I never heard it repeated anywhere.

Everyone on this thread anyway will know that water always finds a way. There has been no way since the beginning that contaminated water wasn't going to get out.

And to answer your question I am hoping that a gutter and a trench is the same thing and even if it isn't, that their "gutters" run out to the sea and not into the water system.
edit on 28/3/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by MissTiger
Fumiaki Nakayama speaking on NHK about the workers that were sent to hospital said


no raditaion contamintation was found in thier bodies, symtoms that may develop now may be red spots that will not require treatment


NHK


Has anyone actually seen any of these workers who have been hurt since the start of this crisis? What happened to the missing people? Does anyone remember various reports that some (4-5) people had been killed? What happened to them?

Seems like a huge cover-up is going on and I wouldn't believe a word Tepco says on the matter.


Injuries
2 TEPCO employees have minor injuries;
2 subcontractor employees are injured, one person suffered broken legs and one person whose condition is unknown was transported to the hospital;
2 people are missing;
2 people were "suddenly taken ill";
2 TEPCO employees were transported to hospital during the time of donning respiratory protection in the control centre;
4 people (2 TEPCO employees,
2 subcontractor employees) sustained minor injuries due to the explosion at Unit 1 on 11 March and were transported to the hospital; and
11 people (4 TEPCO employees, 3 subcontractor employees and 4 Japanese civil defense workers) were injured due to the explosion at Unit 3 on 14 March.

Radiological Contamination

17 people (9 TEPCO employees, 8 subcontractor employees) suffered from deposition of radioactive material to their faces, but were not taken to the hospital because of low levels of exposure;
One worker suffered from significant exposure during "vent work," and was transported to an offsite center;
2 policemen who were exposed to radiation were decontaminated; and
Firemen who were exposed to radiation are under investigation.

Source


Five are now believed to have died, 15 are injured and others have said they know the radiation will kill them as they battle to cool overheating reactors and spent fuel rods.

Sourc e

I have noticed pro-nuclear campaigners absolutely love reminding us all how safe nuclear energy is in comparison to other sources. It looks like they are prepared to protect those figures at all costs.


Chernobyl death toll under 50

The nuclear disaster at Chernobyl almost 20 years ago has so far claimed fewer than 50 lives, according to a study by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Development Programme and the World Health Organisation.

Source

I just had to add this link as an example of how to completely abuse figure to suit an agenda. Here


edit on 28-3-2011 by Moonbeams771 because: (no reason given)



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