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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 264.htm
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posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 09:58 PM
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What is bothering me is the fact that the media is barely covering this anymore and when then do they make a big deal out of reactors 5 and 6 being ok. They were always ok.

Now they are telling people not to drink tap water in areas around the plant

www.cbc.ca...




posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut

With the talk about the reactors operating as breeders, I have to ask:

Are you insinuating in any way that thorium was used to enrich the fuel rods?

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 


and just for the record ..I still have not heard back from them

Thinking about sending it to some other places and seeing what they say

(emailed NY times)
edit on 20-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 
After watching the video several times, I do believe that
a.) the #3 reactor did pop it's cookies

b.)the spent fuel rods are lying scattered around the wreckage

c.) Tepco has bought the big one this time...


seeker



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by chr0naut

With the talk about the reactors operating as breeders, I have to ask:

Are you insinuating in any way that thorium was used to enrich the fuel rods?

TheRedneck
Why do I have this feeling that Chronaut is going to say yes and then you are going to really lay out something really nasty about thorium enriched fuel...


seeker



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by comawhite12
mdn.mainichi.jp...
Seems we really are having usefull information witheld.

Yep. There's no reason at all to withhold that ...
... except of course, to hide how f__d the situation is.

edit on 2011-3-20 by EnhancedInterrogator because: spelling, grammar, formatting, etc.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by okiecowboy
reply to post by Wertwog
 


and just for the record ..I still have not heard back from them

Think about sending it to some other places and seeing what they say


That would be a good idea. The only response I got from Reuters was "the pools are too deep for this to happen". From the moment I saw that pic it seemed to me that the criticality of these rods might be difficult due to their proximity to each other, and that would be good news. This image has been around for a few days now, surely they are "cooling the rods" with all their special firetrucks and whatnot, but for what purpose and why the whole dog-and-pony, unless scattered like this they actually form some kind of more serious threat?
edit on 20-3-2011 by Wertwog because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 
Wertwog, lying scattered around their is nothing to contain or inhibit these highly radioactive rods from zapping the surrounding area...

seeker



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:21 PM
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A photographer holds a radiation detector indicating 0.20 microsieverts per hour at a devastated factory area hit by earthquake and tsunami in Sendai


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The above photo is showing 0.20 microsieverts per hour in Sendai city. Compared to other examples below-




Single Dose Examples-

* Eating one banana: 0.0001 mSv

* Dental radiography: 0.005 mSv[4]

* Average dose to people living within 16 km of Three Mile Island accident: 0.08 mSv; maximum dose: 1 mSv[5]

* Mammogram: 3 mSv[4]

* Brain CT scan: 0.8–5 mSv[6]

* Chest CT scan: 6–18 mSv[6]

* Gastrointestinal series X-ray investigation: 14 mSv[7]

* International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended limit for volunteers averting major nuclear escalation: 500 mSv[8]

* International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended limit for volunteers rescuing lives or preventing serious injuries: 1000 mSv[8]





Yearly Dose Examples-

* Living near a nuclear power station: 0.0001–0.01 mSv/year[7][9]

* Living near a coal power station: 0.0003 mSv/year[9]

* Sleeping next to a human for 8 hours every night: 0.02 mSv/yr[9]

* Cosmic radiation (from sky) at sea level: 0.24 mSv/year[7]

* Terrestrial radiation (from ground): 0.28 mSv/year[7]

* Natural radiation in the human body: 0.40 mSv/year[7]

* Radiation produced by the granite of the United States Capitol building: 0.85 mSv/year[11]

* Average individual background radiation dose: 2 mSv/year; 1.5 mSv/year for Australians, 3.0 mSv/year for Americans[9][5][10]

* New York-Tokyo flights for airline crew: 9 mSv/year[10]

* Atmospheric sources (mostly radon): 2 mSv/year[7][12]

* Total average radiation dose for Americans: 6.2 mSv/year[13]

* Smoking 1.5 packs/day: 13-60 mSv/year[11][12]

* Current average limit for nuclear workers: 20 mSv/year[10]

* Background radiation in parts of Iran, India and Europe: 50 mSv/year[10]

* Elevated limit for workers during Fukushima emergency: 250 mSv/year[14]

edit on 20-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: incorrect info posted



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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Originally posted by the seeker_713g
reply to post by Wertwog
 
Wertwog, lying scattered around their is nothing to contain or inhibit these highly radioactive rods from zapping the surrounding area...

seeker


Hehe, yes I know, but I thought they were more concerned about them melting into goo (criticality).... sigh, I'm so confused.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by MedievalGhost

0.20 µSv/h is equal to 0.0002 mSv/h. So it's like eating 2 bananas an hour. Not that much, especially if you like bananas.

Remember, m = milli, not micro. Micro is µ.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog

Actually, it is like getting run over by a sports car or a freight train. The freight train is more powerful, but either way you won't care.


I still don't think those are fuel rods, though.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog
 
Rods in the pools are ; those scattered won't reach critical because they are scattered; but are also so "hot" that no one can get close enough to do anything with them; I do wonder if those turkeys would let us see a night shot of #3 if we would see a blue glow...


seeker



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by MedievalGhost

0.20 µSv/h is equal to 0.0002 mSv/h. So it's like eating 2 bananas an hour. Not that much, especially if you like bananas.

Remember, m = milli, not micro. Micro is µ.

TheRedneck


Understood, and corrected in previous post. Thanks for clearing that up. I always get confused between micro and milli.
edit on 20-3-2011 by MedievalGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


No, I don't believe that Thorium was being used. I was suggesting that highly enriched Uranium and MOX with a higher Plutonium &/or U235 content was being used as a replacement for some fuel rods (not for the whole core).



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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I've a question regarding this and maybe chr0naut could shed some light on it also.

If those aren't spent fuel rods scattered about could they be some sort of a sheath that they place them in once removed from the reactor for storage?

I don't know the process once they are removed from the reactor with the gantry crane exactly. When they are removed are they removed in singles are do they pull them out as an assembly? (Think like a rapid reload for a revolver.)

Then when they are removed for storage in the pools might they be placed in a sheath before they are racked and stacked?

If those are a sheath for the rods I can see them being of considerably less weight than a fuel rod an able to be more easily scattered about. Still, like others mentioned the area where the storage pool would be located appears to be destroyed.

Soul



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut

OK, thanks for the clarification. My knowledge of breeder reactor physics is somewhat less than ideal, but I do know that they are very dangerous and one hallmark is the use of thorium to 'self-enrich' (gross simplification) the fuel.

Not gonna go into why they are dangerous... sufficient for today are the reactors at Fukushima.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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Japan nuclear safety agency says pressure rising in no. 3 reactor, monitoring whether to take steps to release pressure by "venting".

-Reuters.com

Slow news day. (concerning the reactors atleast)
edit on 3/20/2011 by JackBauer because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by the seeker_713g
 


I think that Thorium reactors are significantly different (the Thorium is usually in liquid form) and while it can produce a neutron cascade like other nuke fuels, its output of weapons grade fuels is low compared to Uranium.

Thorium could, theoretically be used in place of low enriched uranium in a MOX mix. I'm not sure how efficient it would be.

I have seen that Thorium has been used in breeder reactors but I didn't think it would be particularly suited for the task.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by the seeker_713g
reply to post by Wertwog
 
Rods in the pools are ; those scattered won't reach critical because they are scattered; but are also so "hot" that no one can get close enough to do anything with them; I do wonder if those turkeys would let us see a night shot of #3 if we would see a blue glow...


seeker



Why have they been spraying water on them then? Could they just melt and start to glob up like mercury or something? Why all the effort of cooling them? They are radioactive no matter what.



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