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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by Hugues de Payens
 


Here is an Official evacuation order video from March 15th:

U.S. Military Evacuation Video



edit on 20-3-2011 by windwaker because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:23 PM
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"The Tokyo Electric Power Company has decided against releasing gases from the overheating No. 3 reactor in an attempt to reduce pressure inside the containment vessel" www3.nhk.or.jp

from reuters live feed, 25 m ago

Pressure is stabilizing apparantly so for now they won't vent. Pressure is up and down like a yo you isn't it.
edit on 20/3/11 by cosmicpixie because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:24 PM
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Seems there might be something to it. Makes me ALMOST want to start making a few calls. Any way here is a link to an article dated TODAY: I have not and will not verify it's accuracy. www.wsaw.com...

I would add the actual numbers qouted in the story more closly match the 15k number I heard reported but could not substantiate.
edit on 20-3-2011 by soundguy because: content



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by xfooln
The MSM is catching up a bit.

NYT: Executives May Have Lost Valuable Time at Damaged Nuclear Plant



Beyond that there is some modestly good news, if accurate. The article relies on statements of a former senior operator at a Pennsylvania reactor with a similar GE-based design, who said that the cooling systems were a floor beneath the area where explosions occurred in watertight rooms designed to withstand earthquakes. The Fukushima reactors survived the earthquake fairly well. The problems at the site seem to have been triggered by failure of motors and control equipment that were outside these protections and destroyed by the tsunami. So he thought there was a good chance that some cooling systems would be operable after power was restored, though some very dangerous repairs might be needed first.

Thanks for posting that, friend; I tried to point out several pages back that basing damage estimates from the photos was not going to give an adequate estimate, based upon the BWR's that I have seen in person.




One statement in the article surprised me and I'm wondering if our amateur experts know the answer. The article says that because the fuel has continued to cool since the reactors were shut down immediately after the earthquake, only a twentieth of the original amount of water that would have been needed would be enough now to cool the fuel to a stable level. I've seen some data on the rate of cooling of the fuel following a shutdown such as this that would square with this estimate, but it was based on the assumption that the emergency cooling was working throughout the period, which obviously isn't the case here. Is this a clear mistake, or has there been substantial overall cooling despite the partial meltdowns? Or is there too little data to do more than guess?

The key here is they are based on high volume circulation of the water; not on water sitting in the loop and it's only movement due to natural convection; Redneck has made some very astute points on this matter...


seeker



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by monica86
 


Thanks - I know and you know that Chernobyl is most likely responsible for any peaks in radiation and should be more of a concern still for any health related (rather than heartbreaking/moral) concerns re the Japan nuclear crisis... unfortunately one of those links was in French and I'm not fluent - I will dig around for more info on this to whack these scaremongers with..

For the science- folks: Dumb question but I'm still learning (and excuse the non-science terms please) -if the half life of Iodine is 8 days and it will prob take at least that to reach the UK if ever there are levels to be concerned about - then does that mean by the time it reaches here we would have no concerns anyway re the Potassium Iodide option...(except re cesium?) On a similar note - if I have understood the theory of The Redneck - that the radioactivity has been hovering over the plant (so to speak) due to the high heat (explaining the relatively low levels on the ground) - does that mean the longer it is there the less dangerous it is regarding the half life?

My guess is no - and as we are seeing with the levels in the spinach/milk/water the damage is already on the ground...

What can we expect to see next?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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Reactor No. 4: possible of nuclear chain reaction starting.

Status of Fukushima nuclear power plants Sunday midnight Kyodo

Fukushima Daiichi plant

-- Reactor No. 1 (Operation suspended after quake)

Partial melting of core, cooling failure, vapor vented, building housing containment of reactor damaged by hydrogen explosion, roof blown off, seawater being pumped in.

-- Reactor No. 2 (Operation suspended after quake)

Damage to reactor containment structure feared, cooling failure, seawater being pumped in, fuel rods fully exposed temporarily, vapor vented, building housing containment of reactor damaged by blast at adjacent reactor No. 3, blast sound heard near suppression chamber of containment vessel, seawater pumped into pool holding spent-fuel rods on Sunday, access to external power restored Sunday.

-- Reactor No. 3 (Operation suspended after quake)

Partial melting of core feared, cooling failure, vapor vented, seawater being pumped in, building housing containment of reactor badly damaged by hydrogen explosion, seawater dumped over spent-fuel storage pool by helicopter Thursday, water sprayed at it from ground for four days in a row through Sunday.

-- Reactor No. 4 (Under maintenance when quake struck)

Renewed nuclear chain reaction feared at spent-fuel storage pool, fire at building housing containment of reactor Tuesday and Wednesday, only frame remains of reactor building roof, temperature in the pool reached 84 C on March 14, water sprayed at pool on Sunday.

-- Reactor No. 5 (Under maintenance when quake struck)

Some fuel rods left in reactor core, cooling in spent-fuel storage pool resumed Saturday, cold shutdown at reactor on Sunday, access to external power restored Sunday.

-- Reactor No. 6 (Under maintenance when quake struck)

Some fuel rods left in reactor core, emergency power generator and cooling functions restored Saturday, cold shutdown at reactor on Sunday.


edit on 20-3-2011 by Regenmacher because: typo



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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Am I to presume this is the Bio Circuits I heard about? If so lets hope that is correct. Bad news but potentially sickeningly good news none the less, or am I missing something?



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by ljonesyuk
reply to post by iWokeUp
 


So your uk based and think this is bigger than Chernobyl simply based on some illusional theory that there has been a complete block on all information from japan .... So much so that you won't go there anymore.

Seriously , I think you should tape up all the doors and windows for when the TRUTH COMES OUT.
This will be bigger than Chernobyl for Japan and the U.s purely because of the locality, not so for everyone else . The two cannot be compared at all , one blew death thousands of feet in the air and the other one hasn't and won't.
I'll be the first to say I was wrong if it does but it won't , this time next year no one will even remember what the big deal was .


Right, i didn't even post saying that i wouldn't go there again ! The previous poster quoted and messed it up ! Ive never even been to Japan !

Anyway moving on......As Japan stands now, they either have to continuously pour sea water on it for months OR let it blow to relieve pressure..these are there only options.

SO if they leave it pumping out radioactive material and plutonium in to the air for months while they try to cool it, where do you surpose those poisonous gasses will go? Or do you think they just fizzle out like a coal fire's smoke?

Or as i said before if it blows (due to the build up of pressure) it will take all the others with it !!

Jeez why cant you just google it and look for yourself and stop putting your trust in a government, either the Uk, the US or Japan's !!



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by checkmeout
 


Here in Cornwall (UK), we have comparatively high radiation due to the granite rock releasing radon gas. You couldn't build a nuclear plant here as the levels already exceed those allowed for a nuclear plant.

The radon gas shouldn't really be a problem as it can be easily dealt with a few simple steps. The problem is that there are absolutely no signs to tell you that you may be living with excessive radiation - you may worry at first but it's so easy to ignore or forget problems that may exist, especially after living a perfectly healthy life for a few years.


Some of Britain's best-loved beauty spots turn out to have the highest concentrations of what has been termed the country's worst environmental pollutant. It is an invisible, odourless gas that seeps out of the ground and causes an estimated 1,100 deaths from lung cancer every year. It is called radon and last month the number of homes designated at risk was increased five-fold (from 100,000 to between 500,000 and 600,000), rendering millions more people officially vulnerable.


SOURCE

Another problem that has been highlighted with Fukushima is that it’s virtually impossible to get an accurate picture of the true danger of radiation. There are a so many conflicting articles and opinions and everyone seems to have an agenda.

I watched this HERE excellent documentary and was simply amazed that people could apparently withstand such incredible exposure to radiation without dropping dead on the spot. It certainly challenged my understanding of radiation damage.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:24 PM
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What a difference 2 hours can make...

From NHK

Gases to be vented from No.3 reactor

Workers at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are preparing to release gases from the overheating Number 3 reactor to lower pressure inside its container vessel.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said on Sunday that pressure inside the vessel is rising despite efforts to cool the reactor.

The agency said the workers will first try to vent gases through a suppression pool to reduce the amount of radioactive substances released into the environment.

If the pressure doesn't decline, the officials will release gases directly from the vessel. If that happens, the level of radioactive iodine in the air will increase by 100-fold.

Reducing pressure is necessary to protect the container vessel, which keeps radioactive materials inside the reactor in case of an accident.

The plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, says firefighters who are preparing to resume hosing water into the reactor and officials installing power cables will first be evacuated.

The agency says it agreed with the utility firm that it is absolutely essential to release gases despite the expected increase in radiation levels.

Sunday, March 20, 2011 15:16 +0900 (JST)

Then 2.5 hours later...


No gases to be released from No. 3 reactor

The Tokyo Electric Power Company has decided against releasing gases from the overheating No. 3 reactor in an attempt to reduce pressure inside the containment vessel.

TEPCO officials in Fukushima said on Sunday afternoon that pressure within the reactor containment vessel has begun to stabilize, and gases don't need to be released for the time being.

They say they will closely monitor the situation.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency announced earlier on Sunday that pressure inside the vessel is rising despite efforts to cool the reactor by spraying seawater inside it.

The agency said the pressure must be reduced to protect the containment vessel, which holds radioactive materials inside in the event of an accident.

A release of gases could lead to radioactive substances being released into the environment.

Power company officials in Fukushima also say work to restore electricity to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant by connecting the damaged reactors to external power sources is continuing.

Sunday, March 20, 2011 17:42 +0900 (JST)

What's the difference? Around that time meteorologists started revising their projections for the weekend, winds would start blowing west and southwest, towards Tokyo, instead off offshore.

Guess all those "perfectly safe" levels of radiation wouldn't sit well in Tokyo, might let the cat out of the bag.

edit on 20-3-2011 by mrbillshow because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-3-2011 by mrbillshow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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I was searching for soil reports to see what #ushima was built on as I wanted to know where all the water would be draining to. It's built on rock which means they will have built channels in but no idea where they would have those leading to and any surface water would possibly be going into the sea or into man built drains.

I read about it being built on rock here, which is also part of an abstract of a report about how much vibration the plant could take .......

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The basis of this paper is comparative forced vibration testing of two GE 460 MW(e) BWR-type reactor buildings. The tested nuclear power plants are the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Unit No. 1 of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (hereinafter referred to as Fukushima) and the Shimane Nuclear Power Plant of the Chugoku Electric Power Company (Shimane). They are almost the same in both structure and function, but are built on rock of quite different rigidity. The shear wave velocity of Shimane is about three times that of Fukushima. The forced vibration tests were performed immediately after completion of each reactor building using a vibrator with a maximum exciting force of 3 t. The computer simulation analyses were carried out using vibration models possessing different internal viscous damping factors for each structural element. Both the resonance periods and damping factors of Fukushima were found to be larger than those of Shimane. Thus, site selection of nuclear power plants must be reviewed as a matter of utmost importance from the viewpoint of seismic design.



The quote is actually off site but I don't know how to do that yet.
edit on 20/3/11 by MissTiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by mrbillshow
 


Source it, man. We need links for all this.

Great info, we just need to provide citations for all off-site content.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:28 PM
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Most-recent TEPCO press-release ... (about 11 hours ago)
News and conditions in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Plant (currently 6:00 pm, March 20) [English]

Latest NISA press-release (#37) ... (about 7 hours ago)

PS: I hope they soon get at least the diagrams translated to English. That looks like slides showing the status of each of the reactors at Daiichi, and what's going-on with each one.


edit on 2011-3-20 by EnhancedInterrogator because: added post-script



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by Moonbeams771
I watched this HERE excellent documentary and was simply amazed that people could apparently withstand such incredible exposure to radiation without dropping dead on the spot. It certainly challenged my understanding of radiation damage.


Watch this one as well... shows what they had to survive to shut it down

Chernobyl Disaster Documentary
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by mrbillshow
 



We are trained that any exposure may involve some risk. However, exposure with in accepted limits represents a risk that is small when compared to the normal hazards of life.

In other words, no level of exposure is safe. However, it takes a lot of contamination to equate to a measurable dose of radiation exposure, and the risk to people is small when compared to what a person deals with daily. Traffic and crossing a road at a busy intersection comes to mind.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:38 PM
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BTW - Gas WILL be vented as soon as thw wind shifts back to an easterly.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by 00nunya00
reply to post by mrbillshow
 


Source it, man. We need links for all this.

Great info, we just need to provide citations for all off-site content.


Sorry.


www3.nhk.or.jp...
www3.nhk.or.jp...



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by mrbillshow
 



No doubt. One has to either vent or cool to reduce pressure. I have a hard time understanding how the pressure has stabilized with out one or the other.



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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This is from Jiji News, from about 3 hours ago ...

[JiJi News] Tanks to Remove Debris at Quake-Hit Japan Nuke Plant

Tokyo, March 20 (Jiji Press)--Japan's Defense Ministry on Sunday ordered the Ground Self-Defense Force to send two tanks to the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant to remove debris at the quake-hit plant to facilitate work to prevent a radiation disaster.
The Type 74 battle tanks and other relief vehicles left a GSDF garrison in Gotenba, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan, in the evening and will arrive in the northeastern prefecture of Fukushima early Monday morning, the ministry said.
As soon as they receive a request for action, the large blade-attached tanks will enter the radiation-exposed plant of Tokyo Electric Power Co. to clear debris from roads for vehicles to spray water to cool nuclear reactors whose safety systems were battered by the 9.0-magnitude quake and subsequent massive tsunami on March 11.
It is very unusual for battle tanks to join disaster relief operations. But the ministry decided on the voluntary deployment because tanks have high radiation protection capabilities and their mobility is also high, it said.
(2011/03/21-01:48)



posted on Mar, 20 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
More progress. Reactors 5 and 6 are in cold shutdown.

Japan Earthquake Update (20 March 2011, 16:20 UTC)

Japanese authorities have notified the IAEA of progress at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Workers today have successfully placed reactor Unit 5 (at 05:30 UTC) and 6 (at 10:27 UTC) into cold shutdown.


I was under the impression that 5 & 6 weren't active at the time of the quake. Why do they need to point out they are in cold shutdown? I know they were having spent fuel cooling pool trouble but that has nothing to do with the actual reactor.
edit on 20-3-2011 by ethancoop because: (no reason given)




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