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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog

I would rather say it is like explaining that lighting the matches near the gasoline is bad, as opposed to saying nothing about the gasoline and matches lying around.

Nuclear technology exists; there is nothing anyone can do to change that. We can, however, learn to use it safely (or even to not use it), or wait around in confusion and ignorance until someone uses it unsafely.

I prefer education to isolation any day.

TheRedneck




posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91

Not really... regardless of the temperature of a critical mass, it is still putting out massive amounts of heat. I doubt anything could keep it (and its container) solid during such an attempt.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by Imperium Americana
 

By comparing iron oxide to zirconium dioxide, I would say you are comparing apples to oranges.
Rust obviously is a degredation whereas I'm willing to bet that zirconium dioxide doesn't powder and flake off the rods like rust powders and flakes off of rebar. Can you please provide reference that this substance is in any way worse than the original zircaloy?
And yes I'll agree copper does it as well.

www.springerlink.com...

That article suggests oxide hardening in nickel.

Just because a few things do it doesn't mean that they all do it.
edit on 18-3-2011 by TheLastStand because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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"Once we have an electric power supply, we will go slowly and carefully through the plant checking the various machines to see what is working and to also avoid short-circuiting them," a Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency official said at a briefing. Agency spokesman Hidehiko Nishiyama said workers were trying to restore power to the plant's No. 1 and No. 2 reactors Saturday and at the No. 3 and No. 4 reactors by Sunday, Kyodo News says.


I guess we now know why they have to wait until tomorrow to turn power on.

This article also has a picture of Komori breaking down. I feel bad for him, but not nearly as bad as for the people whose lives he has destroyed / permanently altered due to his refusal to tell the truth.

Source
edit on 18-3-2011 by dvrt10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
reply to post by Wertwog

I would rather say it is like explaining that lighting the matches near the gasoline is bad, as opposed to saying nothing about the gasoline and matches lying around.

Nuclear technology exists; there is nothing anyone can do to change that. We can, however, learn to use it safely (or even to not use it), or wait around in confusion and ignorance until someone uses it unsafely.

I prefer education to isolation any day.

TheRedneck


Explaining things to a child is a risky business at best. Often they have to try things and learn from their mistakes, but perhaps the analogy breaks down. I see what you are saying. I do agree that knowledge is power.

Ya, I never wanted to learn about all this stuff but I think it's good to know all you can especially when survival is at stake. Bless you for helping us all struggle with this and getting us informed about the realities. I still hate this technology because in my view the risk is not worth the payoff - but tons of folks would disagree with me there. We have yet to see (and might be witnessing in slow motion - time will tell) the full impact of the destructive potential of this technology... I hope we NEVER do. I'm sure there will be more accidents and I hate to contemplate. It is human arrogance to think we can control every contingency and 'm not sure we're capable of using it safely given all the powers and interests who seem to care about money more than human life. We're doing this to try to maintain a standard of living that is essentially unsustainable, but that is a discussion not for this thread. I do appreciate the information here and would also prefer not to be ignorant if only to know what TPTB have in store for me.

All the posters on this thread have been helpful but it is stressful because this is the only place I have found with real info. You especially have predicted things that will happen far earlier, hours even days earlier, than we see in the media. I thank you for that.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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Live footage of the plant on nhk world now, still smokes rising on at least two of the reactors.
edit on 18-3-2011 by MoonandStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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Fridays are my busiest day. With the media focusing on the mideast again and me being out, could someone be kind enough to provide a bit of a summary of where the situation is at right now?

- Are they still trying to keep things cool
- Are they still trying to restore power
-did they abandon the two above and are now going to bury the place?
-was there a time frame given out for when it would be buried?
-still no "nuclear explosion" danger right?
-impact is still confined to Japan, with some small fallout being spread out (example west coast)

Sorry guys, I am almost 50 pages behind I think.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:03 PM
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www.dailymail.co.uk...


‘There is a growing body of evidence that radiation in excess of what the government says are the minimum amounts we should be exposed to are actually good for you and reduce cases of cancer,’ she told Fox News TV host Bill O’Reilly.

Coulter pointed to articles in the New York Times and The Times of London to back up her argument.

‘So we should all be heading for the nuclear reactor leaking and kind of sunbathing,’ joked O’Reilly.

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...


Trust them? Not going to happen.

I've been monitoring on the readers too, but suspect they would rig them. colorado is usually under 65, often in the 50s or lower. I have a screenshot of it a short while ago at 90. I realize that 126 is the warning level, but that implied a wave. But the bigger readings people have had, I believe are relating to reactor 3.

By the way, if all 6, plutonium in all and spent fuel on top chained, what would happen?
edit on 18-3-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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2152: AFP has more on that "miniscule" amount of radiation detected in California. "Miniscule quantities of the radioactive isotope xenon-133" were picked up by a monitor in Sacramento. "The origin was determined to be consistent with a release from the Fukushima reactors in northern Japan," the Environmental Protection Agency is quoted as saying in a joint statement with the Department of Energy. www.bbc.co.uk...


Shouldn't it be Xenon-135?

Edit:Couldn't be 135, too short of a half-life. Miniscule Xenon-133 is not so bad

edit on 18-3-2011 by premierepastimes because: add text



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by Wertwog

One thing I did not predict early, which is a great compliment to Japanese tenacity... that this would still be under any form of control whatsoever.

And before anyone jumps, that is not to say things are under control. It is only that I would have thought that by this time there would have been massive evacuations, huge die-offs, and one one able to even get close to these plants. It is indeed running in slow motion, again thanks to Japanese tenacity.

I haven't said it in a few pages, so... I certainly admire the Japanese people during this crisis.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


It's what they did in Chernobyl if I remember. A Sarcophagus around it. Seems reasonable.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


If you don't trust them and you are not going to read anything and you are only going to believe your own panic, what is your worth in a discussion.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:09 PM
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MOX in in USA?
I have recently read that the US does not replenish nuclear fuel, this was to assure the public that we have not been reacting plutonium enriched fuels (MOX) in our nuclear facilities. While it might not have been plutonium from spent fuel we have been reacting plutonium for approximately 18 yrs:

in 1993, the United States signed an agreement with Russia to feed U.S. nuclear reactors from old, dismantled nuclear warheads.

LINK

warheads = plutonium



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 


Contrary to not trusting leaders, I do trust in humanity. And grass roots networking, observations, monitoring and testimony. I would take any citizens testimony 100000000.............to infinity over any one working for the Man.


www.radiationnetwork.com...


Usually this reads in the 50s, sometimes 60s.

We're going to have fallout and food contamination, including re-disembursement, contiual uplifting of particles for ages. And thats just us.

I really am concerned about Japan as well. They have a huge population.

And what happens if it chains, I keep hearing about the possiblity of a chain of reactors going off.
edit on 18-3-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-3-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


Sir, that has nothing to do with the facts available, which also state this is far less bad than what you are making it look like.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
reply to post by Unity_99
 


Sir, that has nothing to do with the facts available, which also state this is far less bad than what you are making it look like.


Show us these facts, then, please. Explain what about 80+ tons of exposed MOX rods lying around melting next to each other is nothing to be concerned about.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 




Usually this reads in the 50s, sometimes 60s.


I'm not trying to downplay anything, but this radiationnetwork.com stuff is getting WAY too hyped up. First of all, just how long have you or anyone on this site been monitoring that? How do you know what *usual* is? We do know from the website that above 126 cpm is when we can actually start monitoring that site. The fluxuations you are seeing are present with or without this Japan nuclear disaster.

I've said this several times about the levels in Denver, and I'll say it again. The readings are so far totally within healthy limits. It's higher in Denver because of the altitude. People really need to stop over-hyping that website, it's getting to the point where it's almost annoying.
edit on 18-3-2011 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by premierepastimes

It could be Xe-133. It is an indicator of nuclear reaction, but not very dangerous. Half-life of about 5 days, so it would be in very low quantities anyway.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by Wookiep
 


I have monitored radiation readings for some time and can vouch that this number is high for Denver though not unknown to occur. You will notice that the alert level has been dropped to 100. It was dropped because 100 will actually give you a forewarning of danger and a chance to take precautions rather than tell you that you are currently being fried with radiation. It has dropped and I wouldn't worry about Denver until it hit 110-120. Every place is different. I would start to worry about Alaska if it hit around 50-60 on the other hand.



posted on Mar, 18 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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reply to post by sepermeru
 


It's been posted. The gigacounters in California, the gigacounters from users here. It's a concern for the area in question. of course. But not the entire continent.



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