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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 1250.htm
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posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by Aircooled

And some info on the diagonal crack in the south wall of #4.
www.simplyinfo.org...


Excellent AC, thanks for the heads up to this article. This crack may explain something but needs more research. The photo is incredible. I missed it before. Note that they still haven't touched the melted stairwell that was blown away from just above the crack into the corner where the slag/effium is. Interesting.




posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:22 AM
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Can anyone open this document from the GAO. Its the one about the EPA having so many monitors down in radnet at the peak of the Fuku plume. All I get is file too damaged to open.

www.epa.gov...



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by zworld
Can anyone open this document from the GAO. Its the one about the EPA having so many monitors down in radnet at the peak of the Fuku plume. All I get is file too damaged to open.

www.epa.gov...


opened for me although it's 50 pages long, anything you're looking for in particular?


Why We Did This Review Weaknesses in EPA’s Management of the Radiation Network System Demand Attention
The U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) Office
of Inspector General (OIG) sought to determine whether EPA is following quality control procedures to ensure that data submitted from Radiation Network (RadNet) monitors nationwide are reliable and accurate, and whether EPA effectively implemented corrective actions in response to the EPA OIG’s January 27, 2009, audit report on RadNet.
Background
EPA’s December 2004 Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Protection Plan identified RadNet monitors as critical infrastructure. The mission of RadNet is to monitor environmental radioactivity in the United States to provide high-quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies, and to provide baseline data during routine conditions. RadNet played a critical role in monitoring radiation levels in the United States during the March 2011 Japan nuclear incident.
For further information, contact our Office of Congressional and Public Affairs at (202) 566-2391.
The full report is at:
www.epa.gov/oig/reports/2012/ 20120419-12-P-0417.pdf
What We Found
Broken RadNet monitors and late filter changes impaired this critical infrastructure asset. On March 11, 2011, at the time of the Japan nuclear incident, 25 of the 124 installed RadNet monitors, or 20 percent, were out of service for an average of 130 days. The service contractor completed repairs for all monitors by April 8, 2011. In addition, 6 of the 12 RadNet monitors we sampled had gone over 8 weeks without a filter change, and 2 of those for over 300 days. Because EPA managed RadNet with lower than required priority, parts shortages and insufficient contract oversight contributed to extensive delays in fixing broken monitors. In addition, broken RadNet monitors and relaxed quality controls contributed to the filters not being changed timely. Out-of-service monitors and unchanged filters may reduce the quality and availability of critical data needed to assess radioactive threats to public health and the environment.
EPA remains behind schedule for installing the RadNet monitors and did not fully resolve contracting issues identified in the OIG’s January 2009 report. Until EPA improves contractor oversight, the Agency’s ability to use RadNet data to protect human health and the environment, and meet requirements established in the National Response Framework for Nuclear Radiological Incidents, is potentially impaired.
What We Recommend
We recommend that the Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation establish and enforce expectations for RadNet operations readiness. We recommend improved planning and management of parts availability, monitoring of filter replacement and operators, and monitoring of the installation of the remaining RadNet monitors. Further, we recommend that the Assistant Administrator, in conjunction with the Assistant Administrator for Administration and Resources Management, hold contractors accountable by establishing milestones, using incentives and disincentives, requiring contracting officers and contracting officers’ representatives to formally evaluate RadNet contractors annually, and ensure that the Agency’s Management Audit Tracking System is accurate and current. The Agency concurred with the recommendations except for developing metrics for evaluating frequency of filter changes and completing contractor performance evaluations, which is considered unresolved. The Agency also proposed revised language, which we incorporated where appropriate.

edit on 25-4-2012 by LittleBlackEagle because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle

Originally posted by zworld
Can anyone open this document from the GAO. Its the one about the EPA having so many monitors down in radnet at the peak of the Fuku plume. All I get is file too damaged to open.

www.epa.gov...


opened for me although it's 50 pages long, anything you're looking for in particular?


Thanks LittleBlackEagle. Just knowing it's downloadeable is important. It just means that I need to go to another computer to download. Any computer I use more than once gets tagged and this stuff happens all the time.

If I fail to open it though Ill need to access it through other means. I think it will be important for a lawsuit in the works so it's an important document to hold on to.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 11:41 AM
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interesting snip it from that document.


Japan Nuclear Incident
On March 11, 2011, the magnitude 9.0 Tohoku earthquake in northern Japan created a tsunami that damaged the Fukushima nuclear power plant. In response to the Japan nuclear incident, EPA increased sampling frequency and analysis to detect and measure radiation levels, and inform the public of any changes in those levels. EPA also increased sampling frequency for the milk and drinking water networks, and increased analysis frequency for all networks to detect and measure radiation levels. On April 2, 2011, an EPA press release stated that several EPA air monitors detected very low levels of radioactive material in the United States consistent with estimates from the damaged nuclear reactors. EPA explained that these detections were expected, and the levels detected were far below levels of public health concern.


that bothers me when they say that, since they claimed the same thing from Chernobyl and only now are we seeing the devastation come to fruition.



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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What does anyone make of this video?

www.youtube.com...

As far as I can see from the description, the guy seems to have some things quoted and some pretty devistating proof; not sure if this has been posted, so sorry if it has



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 09:03 PM
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It's like something out of Jim Jones.

ex-skf.blogspot.ca...



posted on Apr, 25 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by Lovell
 


Visit the RENSE.COM website and you will find further info concerning the Video you are questioning, try this

enenews.com... -to-send-in-more-examples-photo

It is ENENEWS.COM who are reporting and offering stacks of photos concerning New plants - some in Japan, some In USA, that are said to be Deformed by Radiation....



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 04:31 AM
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Unit 2: Temps on 3/26/12 vs. 4/26/12



Over time, the higher temps seem the new norm...

3/26:
www.tepco.co.jp...

4/26:
www.tepco.co.jp...

At least pressure going down:


24.26kPa g (as of 11:00 , 4/26 )


www.tepco.co.jp...

Same with Unit 3:
3/26:
www.tepco.co.jp...

4/26:
www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive
edit on 26-4-2012 by Purplechive because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 07:32 AM
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rain swipe for today's rain 100 CPM or .030 mR/hr, about 3 times background here in Pennsylvania.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 09:24 AM
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Originally posted by zworld

Originally posted by matadoor

I'm honestly speechless.

Me too M. I can't believe they sent someone into an area that hot. And just to look under the shield plug. Another thing I dont understand is why they didn't leave the cam in place for monitoring purposes. Or would it have been too hot for that.
edit on 25-4-2012 by zworld because: (no reason given)


I watched that video several times, did everyone see the gamma strikes that were hitting that camera? Even as they were approaching?

That's a job for one of those fancy-schmaucy robots, no human should be in there with the crap rad suits they are issuing.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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Originally posted by matadoor

I watched that video several times, did everyone see the gamma strikes that were hitting that camera? Even as they were approaching?

That's a job for one of those fancy-schmaucy robots, no human should be in there with the crap rad suits they are issuing.


Is that what those bright flashes were that shoot by the cam. Not the pings which I know are rads, but the bright flashes and beams. Is this the gamma M?



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle

that bothers me when they say that, since they claimed the same thing from Chernobyl and only now are we seeing the devastation come to fruition.


Ive been working toxics issues all my life, and that is the first thing anyone says when there is a spill or contamination. About any toxic substance. My rule of thumb is simply this. If someone who regulates or profits from the manufacture of a toxic substance tells you everythings fine after accidental release of a contamninant without doing the research needed to verify this conclusion, then it's BS and there is indeed much to worry about.

Probably the most classic example of this is whats happening in the gulf. BP, the oil industry and the US govt went out of their way to convince everyone that the Gulf was fine after being inundated with millions of barrels of oil and dispersant. And they did this by only giving contracts for research to scientists friendly to the oil industry, and trying to shut down other research projects.

Unfortunately they forgot to tell the deformed sealife to pretend everything was fine as well.There is now a ban on shrimping in certain aeras and a few years from now there will be a ban on consuming anything from the Gulf period and fishing/shrimping will perish as a local industry.

All because we let corporate monsters like Tepco and BP do whatever they want. Brilliant huh.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by zworld

Originally posted by matadoor

I watched that video several times, did everyone see the gamma strikes that were hitting that camera? Even as they were approaching?

That's a job for one of those fancy-schmaucy robots, no human should be in there with the crap rad suits they are issuing.


Is that what those bright flashes were that shoot by the cam. Not the pings which I know are rads, but the bright flashes and beams. Is this the gamma M?


Do you mean at the start? Looks like multiple lights or a curved reflective surface. One appears to be a linear 'bar' type led fixture.
Most of those strikes will be gamma or possibly beta depending on the configuration and definitely no place for people to be, could say that about the whole complex really.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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unsure if anyone has read this article, dated January 2012 but it details some interesting observations on the true impact to Japan as well as the world, that this disaster has given us. covers some interesting economic ramifications as well.

Fukushima: A Nuclear War without a War: The Unspoken Crisis of Worldwide Nuclear Radiation


Nuclear radiation --which threatens life on planet earth-- is not front page news in comparison to the most insignificant issues of public concern, including the local level crime scene or the tabloid gossip reports on Hollywood celebrities.

While the long-term repercussions of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster are yet to be fully assessed, they are far more serious than those pertaining to the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in the Ukraine, which resulted in almost one million deaths (New Book Concludes - Chernobyl death toll: 985,000, mostly from cancer Global Research, September 10, 2010, See also Matthew Penney and Mark Selden The Severity of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster: Comparing Chernobyl and Fukushima, Global Research, May 25, 2011)


globalresearch.ca...



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:14 AM
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reply to post by zworld
 


i hear ya Z , when they say everything is fine, it's probably a good time to choose alternative measures.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by GhostR1der

Do you mean at the start? Looks like multiple lights or a curved reflective surface. One appears to be a linear 'bar' type led fixture.
Most of those strikes will be gamma or possibly beta depending on the configuration and definitely no place for people to be, could say that about the whole complex really.


I think so GR. Pretty near the start after entering the underside of the plug. It looks like an explosion of particles but I cant see where its coming from or what it is. Whatever it is it cant be good. I really wish they had left the endoscope in place so it could be monitored for future reference.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
reply to post by zworld
 


i hear ya Z , when they say everything is fine, it's probably a good time to choose alternative measures.


You mean like......RUN!!!!!

Thats my usual response.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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One of the things about this whole business that is really tiring is that it is so hard to find basic data, like how much uranium was initially onsite, how much now, how much converted in spent fuel etc etc. Youd think we would have made this all mandatory information. They create toxic stuff then they need to let us know how much. Simple yes.

Of course not in the world of Tepco.

Anyway, as ive said many times, my math usually sucks, but Ive been over all the data i can find and i the math a couple times and i think ive got this right.

When all fuel assemblies are added together there was initially 5,019,119 lbs of uranium in all. After five years the amount converted into plutonium, not including that which is in the MOX fuel, equates to roughly 55,000 lbs of plutonium. If older fuel rod accumulation greater than 1.27% Pu and MOX fuel was added to the equation the amount would be even higher.

55,000 lbs of plutonium equals roughly 25,000 kilograms of plutonium. That is how much Pu is onsite at Dai-ichi at this moment minus or plus any created or changed via the explosions and meltdowns.

Now consider that all nuclear explosions by all nuclear countries have released less than 8000 kilograms of plutonium.

There is 3 times the amount of plutonium sitting at Dai-ichi than released in all previous nuke blasts.

And that doesn't include the massive amounts that may be present in the UC.

No wonder I cant sleep at night.



posted on Apr, 26 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by welshbeliever
 



I was trying to find the fuk Japan forum to post radiation test done in St. Louis....I found your post and wll post it here to. I'm on my IPad and I don't know if that's why I'm having a hard time embedding...here's the link...

www.youtube.com...



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