Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 05:03 AM
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Unit 2: Hydrogen Levels Going Down....



The re-start of nitrogen injection seems to be working:

System A:0.28vol% System B:0.28vol% (as of 11:00 , 3/28 )


www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive




posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 05:29 AM
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Holy Crap! Is This the Corium?



Nuckelchen capture:



- Purple Chive



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


I don't think so

(You are talking about this Stuff on the left Side?)

As far as i know and understand (which is not much)
the molten Fuel is dark and solid from the outside and only liquid inside!

The Walls are covered in Corrosion because of the Saltwater!



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 11:55 AM
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Purple...I was wondering the same thing? That sure looks like a glowing core?
I found a full length version of that German doc. It makes the PBS Frontline bunch, look like the butt kissers they are. Some screen caps for ya!









And this was preceeded by "If the #4 fuel pool were to collapse under an open sky".......



And followed by "Armageddon"
www.youtube.com...



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by Purplechive

Holy Crap! Is This the Corium?


Nuckelchen capture:


- Purple Chive


Holy Crap Purple Chive you found it!

UNBELIEVABLE




I dunno which reactor or when this was filmed but there it is... a slug of hotter than hell corium just sitting there. This screen shot is taken underwater at the bottom of reactor well # (?). The video begins with a tremendous burst of Gamma radiation striking the ccd imager. I think when they lowered the camera they actually touched the camera to the corium disturbing it. There is the Gamma burst of ionizing radiation, a cloud of bubbles and oxidized material and then the picture settles down and the camera captures the hardcore evidence.

From :08 to :035 you can see cascading rivulets of the oddest looking molten metal I have ever seen. It "looks like" rivulets of mercury the way it runs down the side of the slug itself. I marked a couple. Watch it for yourself it is CRAZY. (thx purple chive)



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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Too Everyone: Thanks for keeping me up to date on the ongoing slow pollution of our planet. I heard a report from the MSM today about , "Oh MY GOSH, the thingies in Japan are still fizzing!"

So I knew to come here and read up on the truth of the matter and the latest dig dug of facts. Now that I am re re scared out of my wits I shall fade again into the background. Thanks all for being here and keeping up the evidence train.

Intrptr out



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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My Hot rain today/ March 28th, eastern Ontario, 420 ft. Don't mind the sniffles. I've had them since last April. I have no allergies. Probably nerves, right?
Oh I also checked my 130 year old stone basement for the raydon nay-sayers. Ok...normal...0.12 - 0.14 microsieverts.



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by StonedSheep
So the mystery black dust at Minamisoma is magnetic.

MAGNETIC

Can anyone say Vaporised/Aerosolised/Pulverised Mox.

Just a guess, anyone care to enlighten me?


Volcanic ash is paramagnetic. Great for crops because of this, not simply just the fertility.

Japan has a few volcanoes going up so this is quite possibly the source of it. The charge of emitted particulates could attract airborne isotopes to combine, same way you see lightning around eruptions.



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by GhostR1der

Originally posted by StonedSheep
So the mystery black dust at Minamisoma is magnetic.

MAGNETIC

Can anyone say Vaporised/Aerosolised/Pulverised Mox.

Just a guess, anyone care to enlighten me?


Volcanic ash is paramagnetic. Great for crops because of this, not simply just the fertility.

Japan has a few volcanoes going up so this is quite possibly the source of it. The charge of emitted particulates could attract airborne isotopes to combine, same way you see lightning around eruptions.


There are a few Theories here for the "Black Substance",
the first one was already mentioned: "something new because of the Saltwater- molten Fuel Reaction"
and a new one is, i already mentioned Months ago in a different Context but it may be a valid idea
for the "Black Substance or/ and for Arnies finding here in Tokyo,
please have a read and do a further Research:

Fireworks and radioactivity



The basic components of any traditional civil firework is black powder, a mixture of about 75% potassium nitrate, 15% charcoal, and about 10% sulfur [2].

Without the addition of a colouring agent, the fuel would provide an almost white light. Therefore, several metal salts can be added to cause colourful luminescence upon combustion. In general barium is used to obtain a green coloured flame, strontium for red, copper for blue and sodium for yellow [2, 3].

The use of pyrotechnics has raised issues pertaining to health concerns. The health aspects are not only restricted to injuries by accidental ignition of certain devices. Moreover, several recent works identified fireworks and pyrotechnics as causing environmental pollution, which might result in a potential hazard concerning health aspects.

The fundamental problem in this respect is that all chemicals used are dispersed in the environment by combustion. This includes both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4].

A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin.

Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure.

Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6].

Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere.

So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity?
In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium.

The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols, resulting in potential negative health effects, unless an extensive purification of the ores is undertaken.

iopscience.iop.org...

reply to post by intrptr
 


I really doubt this,
a meeting between a hot Corium and Water looks in my Opinion different,
also a Camera can't stand this and Tepco would never show us such a Pic!

When this Water meet the Corium all the Oxygen of the Water would escape in an instant
but we don't see such a Reaction!
But me is not a Specialist, just my Input!

edit on 28-3-2012 by Human0815 because: more
edit on 28-3-2012 by Human0815 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:57 AM
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Reactor 2 radiation too high for access
"73 sieverts laid to low water; level will even cripple robots"


Thursday, March 29, 2012
By MINORU MATSUTANI Staff writer

...

Radiation inside the reactor 2 containment vessel at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant has reached a lethal 73 sieverts per hour and any attempt to send robots in to accurately gauge the situation will require them to have greater resistance than currently available, experts said Wednesday.

Exposure to 73 sieverts for a minute would cause nausea and seven minutes would cause death within a month, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said. The experts said the high radiation level is due to the shallow level of coolant water — 60 cm — in the containment vessel, which Tepco said in January was believed to be 4 meters deep. Tepco has only peeked inside the reactor 2 containment vessel. It has few clues as to the status of reactors 1 and 3, which also suffered meltdowns, because there is no access to their insides.

The utility said the radiation level in the reactor 2 containment vessel is too high for robots, endoscopes and other devices to function properly. Spokesman Junichi Matsumoto said it will be necessary to develop devices resistant to high radiation. High radiation can damage the circuitry of computer chips and degrade camera-captured images. For example, a series of Quince tracked robots designed to gather data inside reactors can properly function for only two or three hours during exposure to 73 sieverts, said Eiji Koyanagi, chief developer and vice director of the Future Robotics Technology Center of Chiba Institute of Technology.


==============================
We have 10 days worth of almost constant fireworks here every year and there are not many black areas left behind. Lots of cardboard tubes and other bits of stuff though. I dont think that the gunpowder left after fireworks is a very good explanation.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:20 AM
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A new MEXT Release



MEXT (Ministry for Education, Sports and Cultural, Science and Technology)
published the new official Radiation Readings,
have a Read:
radioactivity.mext.go.jp...

And my own Readings from this early Afternoon:


We have such a wonderful Weather,
but when i start to think all i can do is .....



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:05 AM
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Some textbooks doubting gov't claims on safety of nuclear power



Textbook screeners have filed no objection to textbooks that express doubts about the government's previous stance before the Fukushima nuclear crisis that nuclear power is safe, according to the results of textbook screening announced Tuesday by the education ministry.

The March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster that claimed the lives of nearly 20,000 people was mentioned in 53 textbooks, or 24 percent, of all textbooks to be used mainly by first-grade senior high school students from April 2013.

Of the 53, 16 took up the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, with some of them expressing doubts about the government's previous position that nuclear power is safe.
---
A textbook on modern sociology said the disaster and the nuclear crisis threw into question the way of life of the Japanese people that is supported by nuclear power.

mdn.mainichi.jp...

Japanese methods in disaster management



Little more than a year after tragedy struck Japan, the debate is in the direction of what after the loss? What can we do? Fukushima may have been accidental but it might carry the effect for long. Data informs of the extent of damage in the three prefectures — Iwate Prefecture, Miyagi Prefecture and Fukushima Prefecture — totalling more than 1,500 fatalities across the region. The struggle to emerge from the tragedy lies in reconstructing the affected areas.
---
There is an ongoing debate about the after-effect of consumption of products from these areas. How much radiation is dangerous and could be cancerous? Only time can measure the real impact.

But the question here is the assimilation of facts at the moment that we take effort to understand.

Rumours have caused immense damage. Radiation is limited to a certain part and beyond that Fukushima is ready to do business. The greater efforts in public-private partnerships are leading to exemplary recovery in the area.

www.dnaindia.com...

Japan's mistakes: Head of disaster review panel says assurances led to complacency



A review of the nuclear disaster found ties to the Japanese public’s strong anti-nuclear sentiment, born in the anti-nuclear protests of the 1970s and with roots in the bombs that fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This sentiment forced utilities to present their nuclear plants as completely safe to the extent that disaster planning and preparation were hindered, according to Yoichi Funabashi, chairman of the Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation, which conducted the review.

Funabashi, who spoke at the Center for Government and International Studies’ Tsai Auditorium on Monday, said the seven-month review revealed a culture of complacency by regulators and a reluctance to alarm the public that ultimately proved harmful. In one case, radiation-resistant robots designed for use in a nuclear disaster were never purchased because utilities were concerned about alarming the public. “None were interested in procuring it because to do that would give the impression that existing nuclear facilities were not 100 percent safe,” Funabashi said.

The power plant was the site of several explosions, reactor meltdowns, and radiation leaks after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck Japan on March 11. The earthquake generated a tsunami in excess of 100 feet high that traveled as far as six miles inland and, at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, destroyed backup generators responsible for keeping the nuclear fuel cool.

Funabashi had harsh words for Japan’s nuclear regulators, saying the utilities had more power than regulators, and that regulators revealed “thorough ineptness” and “lack of qualification” in dealing with the crisis.

www.physorg.com...



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:40 AM
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Unit 2: Kr-85 Way Up



03/29:
www.tepco.co.jp...

03/22:
www.tepco.co.jp...

Don't know what the implication is of higher Kr-85 counts...

The corium reminded me of underwater lava flows. I believe the Nuckelchen capture was from the recent Unit 2 investigation.

- Purple Chive



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:50 AM
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Do anyone located the last Report about the investigation of Nr. 2 on the Tepco Page,
i can't find even that Video!



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:23 AM
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Originally posted by manicminxx
BIG THANKS and much love to everyone who sent me help through PM! I should get software that lets me do this... I wanted to avoid print-screen at all costs.






I have not seen this mentioned yet but isn't this simply where they are spraying the 'treated' water? For the newbies the 'treated' water is still pretty radioactive, just within those shifting goalposts called 'standards'.

Can see why they'd want to prevent a fire anywhere around this plant though - would release a hell of a lot of contaminated dust to the wind, increasing readings suddenly and throwing the spotlight back at fukushima.


Manicminxx you are a star. Thank you so much for your translation efforts around your busy life and work.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by Human0815

There are a few Theories here for the "Black Substance",
the first one was already mentioned: "something new because of the Saltwater- molten Fuel Reaction"
and a new one is, i already mentioned Months ago in a different Context but it may be a valid idea
for the "Black Substance or/ and for Arnies finding here in Tokyo,
please have a read and do a further Research:

Fireworks and radioactivity




I have fused, rigged, fired, cleaned up professional fireworks as part of a handling course. The black soot they left was quite extensive, but limited to the general area for about 100-200m, was reasonable wind but didn't seem to blow debris and visible soot deposits any further than that.
They do have zero-heat indoor fireworks now, also working towards smokeless. The industry is adapting but not fast enough to replace some of the nastier chemicals.

I just doubt pyrotechnics are the source of much of the dust. Some may be pollen, some ash. When volcanoes go up here we get ash over the whole country sometimes. I would hazard a guess that whatever is falling out is dragging down some natural radon and other isotopes from Fukushima.
edit on 29/3/12 by GhostR1der because: grammar



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by Purplechive

Unit 2: Kr-85 Way Up



03/29:
www.tepco.co.jp...

03/22:
www.tepco.co.jp...

Don't know what the implication is of higher Kr-85 counts...

The corium reminded me of underwater lava flows. I believe the Nuckelchen capture was from the recent Unit 2 investigation.

- Purple Chive


“Krypton-85 is the best indicator for clandestine plutonium separations”



www.sciencedirect.com...


A nice way of Tepco admitting to the underground bomb factory really.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:05 AM
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Originally posted by Purplechive

Holy Crap! Is This the Corium?



Nuckelchen capture:



- Purple Chive


Not corium. Just light overexposing on a rounded surface. The rust is called a 'rusticle' they are all over the titanic, they eat the iron impurities in steel, leach it out and leave it brittle and crumbly. And yes it's bacterial.
If it was corium it would exceed 10,000Sv on surface and wreck the camera. Chernobyls' elephants foot measured this high, whilst having significant amounts of neutron poisoner - chiefly boron and some sand added. Basically the only way to video it would be with a zoom lens.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:53 AM
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reply to post by GhostR1der
 


Thank you for your Input regarding to the Fireworks!

You know that the Japanese love Fireworks and we have a few really big ones,
only the major 5 burns all together ca. 100.000 - 120.000 Rockets,
source: www.sunnypages.jp...
would be the Level of the Residue also limited to a small Area?

How much weight would this Substances have?

Do they use Cobalt-60?
edit on 29-3-2012 by Human0815 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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Originally posted by Human0815
reply to post by GhostR1der
 


Thank you for your Input regarding to the Fireworks!

You know that the Japanese love Fireworks and we have a few really big ones,
only the major 5 burns all together ca. 100.000 - 120.000 Rockets,
source: www.sunnypages.jp...
would be the Level of the Residue also limited to a small Area?

How much weight would this Substances have?

Do they use Cobalt-60?


For a very large display approximately 5-10 tonnes of pyrotechnics, sometimes much of that is taken up by packaging depending on configuration, still puts many tonnes of debris and tens of kilos of toxins in the air, depending on colors used. Major fallout would depend on wind and display height, for very large displays I would estimate up to 500m radius for most larger fallout and soot when there is a steady wind. Any extremely fine particles (smoke) will travel much further in high volumes and heights, 10s of kilometers. These also should be accounted for. Due to the particle size and amount of smoke compared to watershed area, rain out would be very hard to blame for such a widespread collection of concentrated dust as we see in photos. Also iron is used in fireworks but not huge amounts that would cause high magnetism. In New Zealand, we are not allowed to fire above 30kmh wind due to dust/debris fallout, under pyrotechnics code of practice.

Largest show I know of is 15 tonnes. Japan has the best fireworks in the world and the largest; a 48" shell, it's breathtaking.



Cobalt 60 is an isotope, cobalt exists in non isotope form. Small amounts of contamination could exist perhaps but I doubt much. Fireworks hazard is more of a chemical one. And stored energy.
You may be also interested in phosphate fertilizer used by the tobacco companies, it contains radioactive lead and polonium, this and radon in soil is the real cause of tobacco related lung cancer.
www.epa.gov... From the wizards own mouth!

I still believe it to be most likely volcanic ash. Meteors also come down in the rain and can be magnetic too. Collect them with an icecream container if you care to try.




Sakurajima volcano on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, continues to be more active than usually at the moment. Yesterday, a stronger explosion occurred that produced an ash column reaching 3 km altitude (Flight Level 90 = 9,000 feet) which drifted to the south, as the Tokyo VAAC reported.


21st March 2012

www.volcanodiscovery.com...

Magma can be radioactive.. so ash can be too. So it could be already hot regardless of bringing down aerosolised Fukushima particles. I'm confident Sakurajima is the culprit here.





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