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The Secret Internet Uncovered

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posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 12:11 PM
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The Deep Web



Hi everyone, it has been a while. I want to share with you something that a friend recently told me about, and I GUARANTEE that the vast majority of you have never heard about it just like I hadn’t, and it will blow your frickin mind!

‘THE DEEP WEB’

Deep Web Wiki


The Deep Web (also called Deepnet, the invisible Web, DarkNet, Undernet or the hidden Web) refers to World Wide Web content that is not part of the Surface Web, which is indexed by standard search engines.

In 2000, it was estimated that the deep Web contained approximately 7,500 terabytes of data and 550 billion individual documents.[2] Estimates based on extrapolations from a study done at University of California, Berkeley speculate that the deep Web consists of about 91,000 terabytes. By contrast, the surface Web (which is easily reached by search engines) is about 167 terabytes[dubious – discuss]; the Library of Congress, in 1997, was estimated to have 3,000 terabytes.


At this stage I was really intrigued, and started doing some more searching.

‘TOR’

Tor Project Wiki


Tor is a network of virtual tunnels that allows people and groups to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. It also enables software developers to create new communication tools with built-in privacy features. Tor provides the foundation for a range of applications that allow organizations and individuals to share information over public networks without compromising their privacy.

Individuals use Tor to keep websites from tracking them and their family members, or to connect to news sites, instant messaging services, or the like when these are blocked by their local Internet providers. Tor's hidden services let users publish web sites and other services without needing to reveal the location of the site. Individuals also use Tor for socially sensitive communication: chat rooms and web forums for rape and abuse survivors, or people with illnesses.

Journalists use Tor to communicate more safely with whistleblowers and dissidents. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) use Tor to allow their workers to connect to their home website while they're in a foreign country, without notifying everybody nearby that they're working with that organization.


All the buzz about Wikileaks over the last year, and not once did I hear this mentioned, but it is obviously very well known about as there are huge communities out there and also companies who are working on indexing it all.

‘.ONION’

.Onion Wiki


.onion is a pseudo-top-level domain host suffix (similar in concept to such endings as .bitnet and .uucp used in earlier times) designating an anonymous hidden service reachable via the Tor network. Such addresses are not actual DNS names, and the .onion TLD is not in the Internet DNS root, but with the appropriate proxy software installed, Internet programs such as Web browsers can access sites with .onion addresses by sending the request through the network of Tor servers. The purpose of using such a system is to make both the information provider and the person accessing the information more difficult to trace, whether by one another, by an intermediate network host, or by an outsider.

Addresses in the .onion pseudo-TLD are opaque, non-mnemonic, 16-character alpha-semi-numeric hashes which are automatically generated based on a public key when a hidden service is configured. These 16-character hashes can be made up of any letter of the alphabet, and decimal digits beginning with 2 and ending with 7, thus representing an 80-bit number in base32.

The "onion" name refers to onion routing, the technique used by Tor to achieve a degree of anonymity.

A few examples of .onion hosts are:
• Tor: anonymity online, gateway to torproject.org
• House of Anonymous, an anonymous manifesto
• THE LOVEZONE - CHAT - SAFETY-101, identity safety guidelines
• Tor network search - Torgle v3, a search engine and service index
• Freedom Hosting, free hidden web hosting with PHP and MySQL
• The Tor Library, small library of books in PDF and other common formats
• talk.masked, an anon-post board


This has really got me thinking and contemplating how to move forward with this. Can you imagine the wealth of information out there and the possibilities? It is like a new frontier.

Companies like Google are now trying to index this material, why? To provide everyone with access to all information just as it should be or to make sure that people can’t store away hidden information In the first place?





I’m sure this is going to grab your attention just as much as it has mine, but before we get all excited can we just take not of the following:

• Let’s use this thread for helping each other explore the deep web, sharing resources and tips.
• DO NOT constantly reply with single line posts such as ‘Whoa Dude that is Nuts’, or ‘I’m staying well away from that’.
• Let’s think about how to use and benefit from this and recommended what we should do with it.

If you are one to jump right in, take heed of the following:


Want Tor to really work?
...then please don't just install it and go on. You need to change some of your habits, and reconfigure your software! Tor by itself is NOT all you need to maintain your anonymity. There are several major pitfalls to watch out for:


Precautions

Also think about the mentality of people who are already settled in on the ‘Deep Web’. They are more than likely advanced computer users and the risk that is showing itself to me at the minute is the risk of hacking etc.

Did a search here on ATS and was surprised to find it had only been brought up once, by Skyflaoting. So please no accusing the staff of ATS of trying to ‘hide information’. Skyfloating is a super moderator and I’m sure would be just as excited that this topic is being revived as I am.

Skyfloating Thread

See you on the other side!

Carlitomoore



Forbidden Knowledge




posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 12:20 PM
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Thankyou so much, I know where I'll be for awhile...this is great information to follow up on. One of the primary reasons I visit ATS, is because nice people like you, work really hard for fellow members! Star and flag for sure.


+13 more 
posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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People get confused with this. They hear darknet and think it's some secret hidden internet. It's not. What the "darknet" is are people using methods to obfuscate and bypass security. TOR (onion routing) is toted as a quick way to be anonymous online but in reality, it isn't perfect and you can still be tracked.

Something as simple as using 'pirate DNS' severs instead of the standard ones gets you on "the darknet" Pirate not relating to infringement or that scene, Pirate as in Pirate radio, running off the grid.

the terabytes of data they talk about isn't some secret file crypt, it's merely an estimation of the amount of data being shared under the radar, using alternate DNS, or rouge ones, using security basically.

The darknet merely refers to stuff you can get to as the average user searching on google, as the sites aren't listed, only on their darkDNS servers, so you'd get a 404 error when attempting to access the site unless you change your dns to resolve to one provided by one of these groups.

It's a neat idea and hearkens back to the days of dialing into a BBS on a 2400 baud modem. If you know the right web forums, and how to ask, you can easily get access to this stuff.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by carlitomoore
 


WOw this is extremely useful info,
I just found this
www.collectionscanada.gc.ca...
enjoy
lots of info about the canadian ufo's straight from the governemtn.
If you look into the Falcon beach one.. quite eye opening. the soil samples were highly radioactive. what a great trove of information!



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 12:54 PM
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pro tip

DO NOT confuse anonyminity with security. But sure, by all means take a stroll through tor park why not, the chinese do!



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 06:58 PM
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A lot of darknet clients send & recieve vast amounts of information about file fragment locations & etc.

About 4 years ago I participated in the Freenet project.This resulted in data transfers exceeding 12 gigabytes per month, despite my barely using Freenet and which cost me a small fortune.

I have toyed with TOR and anonymous proxies since then and I find that they are still a bit too "labour intensive" to get anything done (IMHO).

I applaud their goals but I believe that the ultimate solution is to replace DNS with something more robust, secure and anonymous.

At present, governments and ICANN have the ability to "kill" the internet, either totally or in segments, by interfering with DNS.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 07:01 PM
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Originally posted by carlitomoore

I want to share with you something that a friend recently told me about, and I GUARANTEE that the vast majority of you have never heard about it just like I hadn’t, and it will blow your frickin mind!



Pretty sure now days they teach everyone about it at school, actually I don't know about other countries). But I do know you cant pass many university courses without using it so its not exactly a secret.

But yeah, its cool all the same.
edit on 18-2-2011 by polarwarrior because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 07:10 PM
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DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

the deep web is FILLED with child pornography!
if you so much as read one thing or open one page even by accident youre IP is logged and you face arrest and federal imprisonment.

In fact it would seem that 99% of the deep web is Child pornography.
The only reason they made the DEEP WEB was to have a place to post child pornography.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by tigpoppa
 


3/10.
they see me trollin.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 07:43 PM
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Originally posted by tigpoppa
DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

the deep web is FILLED with child pornography!
if you so much as read one thing or open one page even by accident youre IP is logged and you face arrest and federal imprisonment.

In fact it would seem that 99% of the deep web is Child pornography.
The only reason they made the DEEP WEB was to have a place to post child pornography.



Really?
That's pretty scary and disgusting.
Can anyone else confirm this?



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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It seems that it is just a section of server space that does not show up on Google or the other search engines and is used to store and share data off record. I have to agree with the previous poster about the child porn, the place is prob a haven for illegal pics and video. I would not care to think what is down there and what type of people play, if it was a place it would prob be Mexico



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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Is RATS a part of that? It doesn't come up in searches.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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Here's a nice, long, 52 page PDF with a lot of links, to help you understand better: Deep Web Research



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 08:06 PM
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If it's uncovered, then it isn't 'secret'.



Interesting, nonetheless.


There are ways of exploiting the 'surface' internet for communications, data and file sharing, that are far more secure than anything in the OP.

The best way to the 'undernet' is through the surface.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by tigpoppa
DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

the deep web is FILLED with child pornography!
if you so much as read one thing or open one page even by accident youre IP is logged and you face arrest and federal imprisonment.

In fact it would seem that 99% of the deep web is Child pornography.
The only reason they made the DEEP WEB was to have a place to post child pornography.



that's how usenet used to be.
I was in the foods part of the forum, and accidentally found a child porn ring in a folder called 'asparagus'.
eyes burned for weeks after that.



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 09:06 PM
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I'll be rooting around on this thing as a topic for the show. If I get sucked in, it's been nice knowing everyone.
edit on 18-2-2011 by billxam because: added a funny line



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by tigpoppa
DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

DO NOT GO TO THE DEEP WEB!

the deep web is FILLED with child pornography!
if you so much as read one thing or open one page even by accident youre IP is logged and you face arrest and federal imprisonment.

In fact it would seem that 99% of the deep web is Child pornography.
The only reason they made the DEEP WEB was to have a place to post child pornography.


And how would you know this?



There is some really scary stuff, not made up, on the other side... Secret communications, information and more, most of it is buried in layers of encryption.

Accessing and decoding a lot of the "important" stuff (not porn) isn't easy, and for most people you could consider it impossible.

So what is the point?



+13 more 
posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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The funny, yet sad thing is, most people think the web is the only part of the internet.

I am actually happy with this.

Black Monday, or "Eternal September" back in the 90's, is a large part of what changed the internet from what it was, to what it has become today. Some of it good, some of it bad.



1993: AOL Ruins The Internet

Geeks remember it as the "Eternal September." That was when AOL opened up formerly exclusive USENET groups to a flood of floppy disk-wielding newbies, forever ruining the internet for a few elites who hoped to keep the 'net as their exclusive domain. Sad. There was no putting the genie back in the bottle.

Read more: www.businessinsider.com...

another interesting read:

en.wikipedia.org...


Eternal September (also September that never ended)[1] is a Usenet slang expression, coined by Dave Fischer, for the period beginning September 1993.[2] The expression encapsulates the belief that an endless influx of new users (newbies) since that date has continuously degraded standards of discourse and behavior on Usenet and the wider Internet.

(emphasis mine)

Basically what happened in a nutshell.

AOL released a graphical interface for the web. A bunch of back-to-scoolers (hence the September) got new pc's and AOL access.

The influx of people who had no clue was shocking to the previously closed culture that was heretofore known as the 'net. Experienced programmers and users were all of a sudden flooded with AOL users posting messages somewhat reminiscent of things we see on ATS at times, such as "OMG! THEIR IS A POALE SHIFT HAPPENINK RIGHT NOW!!11!!1".

Then, as the neverending September continued, comes Nescape, and finally Windows.

This is what "most" people know of the 'net. Graphical interfaces that show lots of pretty pictures while in reality keeping people from enjoying more real, deeper content. Just because Windows became the platform of choice for ease and pretty pictures, does not mean that it is all there is, though some people do believe this, and have no idea there is more. Much, much, much more. Note the bolded text of mine above, and ask yourself, "What do they mean, wider internet?".

There is more to the 'net than meets the eye. In fact, the majority of the 'net is still somewhat undiscovered and unused by "most". This works, in part, to keep it "cleaner", more pure, and more functional for information sharing.

With the advent of the graphical browser also came the inept and culturally unknowing into a mix of what you could only call "'net geeks". They resented the intrusion into their world, mostly because the intruders just plain didn't know what they were doing.

They were breaking into a world where Netiquette was very important, and most people simply followed the rules for the sake of civility. Thankfully, a good many people were, and still are, happy with pointing and clicking.

On top of all that, you had people that wished the destroy the hierarchy of the "elitist" groups.
en.wikipedia.org...(Usenet)


HipCrime is referred to as "a leading Usenet Terrorist" by James Farmer, maintainer of Spamfaq: Part 3: Understanding NANAE


The next event was the introduction of spamming, MLM (multilevel marketting), which is still in play today as we all know. (junk mail)

It was during this time that people used BBS's and Fidonet to communicate. With the advent of the "Internet Killswitch", you will see people reverting back, but with newer technology, to this type of communication and networking, because this is the one area the government will not be able to interfere with.

The still largely unused areas of the 'net, will, for now - remain unknown, because people would have to actually learn more than how to point and click, which embodies the theorem of "Black September". The typical "AOL" type user will not have any desire to explore, nor the knowledge to empower them to do so. They will also be the ones screaming from their front porches about "OMG I can't get on Facebook!", instead of managing an alternate means of access.

So yes, I am happy about it, not because I am elitist, but because information sharing is best when it is uncluttered and you don't get 200,000 messages a day sreaming, "ChEaP ViAgRa!" and "Make Money Now!".



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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In looking for ordinary people, like me to be able to check this out I found this, given what was said earlier, about college I am thinking it works. Haven't tried it, so can't say for sure. Have to say this thread gobsmacked me, had no idea. Here is link:

www.online-college-blog.com...



posted on Feb, 18 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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I've heard that the internet that we all know and love is like the surface of an ocean. When we search in it, we're just skimming our nets on the surface. Deepwebs are exponentially larger than this internet, and in my experiences in it, exponentially more sinister.

I've recently become interested in the TOR project, and delved into Onion-Land (part of the Deepweb) a little bit. Let me tell you now, there's not too much of value out there that's visible and accessible to the "public". The whole point of .onion sites is to have a (relatively) anonymous site, away from the prying eyes of the public and search engines. Generally, terrorist networks, spy agencies, drug dealers, assassins-for-hire, and those looking for child porn lurk around these parts. Lots of sites are invite only, and you'll never, ever find them unless you get involved with some really shady people in real life.

This said, there are also open .onion blogs and forums that have some interesting debates going on about some pretty radical and interesting topics. It's true freedom of speech when you're anonymous and (relatively) untraceable... But again, there are some nasty people out there. There's lots of illegal filesharing, books and documents, music and cracked programs... Heck, Wikileaks has an .onion site in the Deepweb. It's a form of protection from TPTB.

So anyways, what I'm saying is, if you're serious about jumping into this, BE CAREFUL OF WHAT YOU CHOOSE TO DO.

One thing that I like is the "anonymous financial system" that is going on in the deepweb... Things like convertible BitCoins that act as anonymous and untraceable money to buy things online (mainly other deepweb sites). Hope that sort of thing catches on in the mainstream. And anonymous surfing too, I can only dream of the day where it's as fast as vanilla-net! *drool*

If anyone is interested, get TOR up and running (and if you're generous, set up an exit node
), and then crawl for .onion sites. I recommend you try to find pages that list HiddenServices... The Hidden Wiki is a good place to start. I'm not sure if it's a good idea for me to post the links to these things here though... This stuff is NOT safe in just anyone's hands, and I don't want anyone here getting their doors knocked down by MIB agents at 4 a.m.
edit on 18-2-2011 by pforkp because: (no reason given)





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