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Detroit Will PAY You To Take One Of These 100 Abandoned Homes

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posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:42 AM
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Detroit Will PAY You To Take One Of These 100 Abandoned Homes


www.businessinsider.com

Mayor Dave Bing is trying to save Detroit by offering incentives to lure residents back to abandoned neighborhoods.
One program offers $150,000 in housing renovation money and requiring only $1,000 down to police officers who are willing to relocate to the city. Another offers college graduates $2,500 to rent and $20,000 forgivable loan to buy properties.
Potential home buyers can choose from plenty of cheap or free homes, especially in the blighted neighborhoods of Woodward Ave. and Brush Park.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:42 AM
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These were once some wonderful homes before the Big 3 began abandoning Detroit for savings on labor, health care costs by closing factories in the U.S. and opening them abroad, in an all too familiar process of Corporate America looking for greener pastures elsewhere to enhance and add to its bottom line.

So called ‘Rust Belt’ cities, full of abandoned homes and neighborhoods caused by corporate flight have in recent years looked at a variety of novel ways to reinvent themselves from turning blighted neighborhoods into bulldozed park land, community gardens and in some cases giving the land and homes away for practically free.

Now Detroit seems to be ready to take it one step further in forgivable homes and massive grants to refurbish and make some of its worst homes and neighborhoods livable again.

In recent years homes for as little as a $100.00 have lured artists and entrepreneurs and young families looking for a home of their own into these neighborhoods where your neighbors are more likely to be squatters in a boarded up home or a crack house

Like rebuilding in below sea level flood zones and other risky housing ventures is it wise for a city struggling with high unemployment, a declining tax base, and the flight of industry to pay people to reoccupy places that time forgot?


www.businessinsider.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


+6 more 
posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


My wife would never go for it, but man that is a lot of opportunity!

Buy a home, buy up your whole neighborhood really. Police it, clean it up, move in your friends and relatives. Start a little community store, and a barbershop, and a gym. Make it something nice with an extremely low cost of living. Possibly even buy some surrounding blocks, bulldoze some of the houses, build parks or buffer zones.

With almost free Real Estate, and support of the City Government and Council, someone could really turn that place around and make it nice for everyone.

I gotta run it by the wife some more.

You in Proto?

Survival community? Organic community? Old School community with a Five and Dime and an Ice Cream Parlor and a Mayberry style barbershop?

We can control the crackhouses, that part isn't a real issue in my opinion.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


I would love to join you my friend, on select warm summer days, once the neighborhood gets that clothing optional heated community pool up and running! (keep me posted).

Back in the 1970's New York City had some blighted neighborhoods that it did very similiar things with and the artists and entrepenuers who took up the challenge ended up transforming them into some of the trendiest and coolest parts of town with a lot of hard work and a few lean years.

Detroit is a great city, and the people in Michagan rock, some of the greatest minds and moderators too on ATS are from Michigan and the Detroit areas, if anyone can and could save the city after being abandoned by the Big 3 and many of the co-dependent Pars and Electronic Companies it's hard working intelligent people like them.

So I hope this works out for them, but in a business environment that's rife with endless codes and stiff competition from corporate monopolies, can cities manage to create enough jobs and job opportunities to sustain rehinhabitted neighborhoods first abandoned by lack of opportunity, and is it a process of just throwing good money after bad?

Those are all some great ideas you have there my friend.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


The internet is the key to the "business codes" and lack of industry. Why not use that cheap real estate and cheap labor force to start a giant E-bay warehouse? Or a technology help-desk? Maybe even a Google-style company that innovates automotive ideas? All of those laid off and retired Automotive experts in that area could surely create some innovation in the arena of automotive technology. Work 30 hours on real work, get paid 10 hours to develop your own project with company resources, and donate 10 hours to maintaining the plant, the equipment, and the neighborhood. Win-Win-Win.

Surely there are some entrepreneurs that could finance a gig like that? Then we build up the neighborhood and the support services like eateries, beauty shops, and daycares around the plant.

This thing needs a little bit of financing, a little bit of sacrifice, a lot of hardwork, and it could be HUGE!!

Maybe Eminem would put in some seed money? Get a few Detroit celebrities together, name some stuff after them and we're off and running!



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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I picked out my new house......photo 31

Now all I need is a limestone 20 foot fence placed around it and bob's your uncle!



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


So WTH do I sign up? This link don't tell me that? I would love to have one of those homes! I can get the college graduate thingy soon I will be graduating with my associate's and my significant other is a contractor and can refurbish the home beyond beyond...He's very talented and smart. So he was in agreement of getting one of these homes. Problem is where do we sign up? I never owned a real house (We have a mobile home) You better believe I would treat it better than gold!!!! I would be so ecstatic!



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by bluemirage5
 


#31 is awesome!

Man those pics are sad. Looks more like Bosnia than Detroit. Still worth saving though! For every broken dream, there is a dreamer somewhere. Every unemployed worker is a potential hard-working game changer! They need leadership and innovation............and seed money.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:15 AM
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I like #64. no house, just a big freaking tree lmao. I'd pick that plot, build whatever I want

as for #31.. it needs a moat
and maybe some dragons

It would be an amazing idea to buy up a neighbor hood, I would be in for that, I know others who would be as well. Unfortunately were Canadian lol.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by ldyserenity
 


Start contacting these guys.

and

The Mayor's Office

Really, if you are serious, it just takes tenacious action. There is help out there, but it is buried in Bureaucracy and Red Tape. If you can navigate that BS, then you can make an impact.

Let us know if you get anywhere!



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


OH BOY

this one works for me
www.100abandonedhouses.com...



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler


These were once some wonderful homes before the Big 3 began abandoning Detroit for savings on labor, health care costs by closing factories in the U.S. and opening them abroad, in an all too familiar process of Corporate America looking for greener pastures elsewhere to enhance and add to its bottom line.

So called ‘Rust Belt’ cities, full of abandoned homes and neighborhoods caused by corporate flight have in recent years looked at a variety of novel ways to reinvent themselves from turning blighted neighborhoods into bulldozed park land, community gardens and in some cases giving the land and homes away for practically free.

Now Detroit seems to be ready to take it one step further in forgivable homes and massive grants to refurbish and make some of its worst homes and neighborhoods livable again.

In recent years homes for as little as a $100.00 have lured artists and entrepreneurs and young families looking for a home of their own into these neighborhoods where your neighbors are more likely to be squatters in a boarded up home or a crack house

Like rebuilding in below sea level flood zones and other risky housing ventures is it wise for a city struggling with high unemployment, a declining tax base, and the flight of industry to pay people to reoccupy places that time forgot?


www.businessinsider.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


Bringing in the college grads will most likely bring in business, especially if it was me, I would open a computer technician and custom computer/networking business, especially if I could get a business loan because I am bringing my butt to Detriot...this could be very good for their economy actually.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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Being from detroit area, I can say that I would very much like this offer and might even take it up. I know we would use lots of land for farming, the only issue would be drugs and gangs. Most of these areas are the running ground for these things. If we could help even those in gangs and those who were slaves to their local crackhouse, we would have the most important support of all.
That's the difficult part.
A neighborhood school created by a community who moved in would be good, or perhaps using skills as builders and renovators to help make certain areas besides ones own home nicer and more functional. That might help...but it's rough there for sure.
I worked in Brightmoor for a while (one of those areas with 10 burned down houses and 10 empty lots and 2 houses with residents on a street) and experienced wonderful people, very sad sights and definitely gang activity.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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... Yeah.


But who's going to pay for your funeral ???



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by ldyserenity
 


Start contacting these guys.

and

The Mayor's Office

Really, if you are serious, it just takes tenacious action. There is help out there, but it is buried in Bureaucracy and Red Tape. If you can navigate that BS, then you can make an impact.

Let us know if you get anywhere!


Well thanks for that, um, well (nervous laugh) I think I'd see a snowball have a better chance in Hades. I think I'd be too much of a snowflake for their liking. :/



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:22 AM
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This could be a win-win for a lot of people, couldn't it? I applaud this mayor and Detroit for taking steps to attempt to revitalize his town, and am going to choose to ignore pessimists, naysayers, and the usual doom and gloomers who will likely be along any minute now to tell us how this is a waste of money and won't ever work.

edit on 2/17/2011 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by bluemirage5
 


#31 is awesome!

Man those pics are sad. Looks more like Bosnia than Detroit. Still worth saving though! For every broken dream, there is a dreamer somewhere. Every unemployed worker is a potential hard-working game changer! They need leadership and innovation............and seed money.


Some of these homes were really incredible back in the day, including a lot of 'Sears Homes' pre-fabricated homes purchased through and delivered by Sears for assembly.

If you have the money for Restoration Hardware you can turn some of these into some amazing show pieces.

With up to 150,000 to renovate you can buy a lot of hardware too.

Saddly most of these homes have been gutted, of their copper pipes and plumbing fixtures, and the immediate draw back is typically they require you to live in them 24/7 so rewiring and repiping a home, is a process that's going to lead to some creative living at the onset.

Call up port-a-potty and get a shower head hose that attaches to 5 gallon water bottles because you are going to need them at first.

They are amazing opportunities though for people who want to endure the initial hardships and the risks of living in a bilighted neighborhood to start out.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:25 AM
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I can't lay claim to this as another member of ATS posted this some time ago but look what else has been abandoned in Detroit........

www.guardian.co.uk...

This tired old city looks awsome alright!



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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*sigh* what a goddamn shame. you can blame the auto industry for so much, then you have to look at whos been running the show there. this started with mayor young and has only gotten worse. those pics remind me of when I was a kid and my dad took me to the bars on jefferson. and it was bad then, now it's like a million times worst. still if enough (decent) people were to take this seriously, might be something to it....



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by ldyserenity
reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


So WTH do I sign up? This link don't tell me that? I would love to have one of those homes! I can get the college graduate thingy soon I will be graduating with my associate's and my significant other is a contractor and can refurbish the home beyond beyond...He's very talented and smart. So he was in agreement of getting one of these homes. Problem is where do we sign up? I never owned a real house (We have a mobile home) You better believe I would treat it better than gold!!!! I would be so ecstatic!


I would try contacting the local Detroit Tax Collector as they probably have a listing of these homes and the program numbers and departments you will need to contact.

Try Detroit.gov or org and see if you can find or google the city's official web site, they probably have some exerps on the home page advertising the offering.

Let us know what you find too, oh and when the first Bar-b-que is.

Congradulations on almost graduating, I can still remember when you were just this high, and heading off for your first day of kindergarden, oh where the time goes too?



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