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Question: What do you do if you are poisoned and can't goto a hospital?

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posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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I don't like making threads, but what do you do if you are bitten by a poisonous spider or snake? I can't find an answer anywhere without going to a hospital.. Do you just die? That's what my mother said lol. I don't buy it. There has to be a way huh?

Sorry to make this thread a short one.
edit on 8-2-2011 by Mizzijr because: Add on




posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 03:47 PM
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Do what you do to survive.
Suck the venom out if you believe you will die.

I think that's better than dying.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by Mizzijr
 


What kind of poisoning? Here is some info on what to do inititally, and if you can't reach a hospital, try the phone #'s in these inks. Best wishes

www.uihealthcare.com...
www.mnpoison.org...

Peace,
spec



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by Mizzijr
 


I have a snakebite kit in my bag. That is a start.

There are some threads and some good internet sites that say a tazer across the wound can damage the venom and stop the cascade of symptoms. It has a lot of practical support, but no medical endorsement. I suppose makeshift electrical shocks could have similar effects in a life or death situation.

Isolate the bite. Tourniquet. In an extreme situation with a known deadly snake, maybe amputation would even be in order? Only if the person were absolutely certain of what bit them, and certain that the venom was injected.

If nothing can be done to stop the spread of the venom, and no anti-venom is available, then it becomes a battle of wills. Keep them hydrated and resting and pray for the best.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 03:59 PM
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Sucking the venom out does not work, the venom spreads so fast it'd be almost impossible. If you get bitten by a venomous snake, such as a rattlesnake and you don't get medical attention within an hour and half, you will die, there is no nice way to put it but venom is meant to kill a man whether he applies a tourniquet or not, a tourniquet will only buy you time, it does not mean you will survive. If you are alone in the woods and are bitten by something highly venomous, there is no way around it, without anti-venom you will die unfortunately.
edit on 8-2-2011 by DevilDog0311 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by Anttyk47
Do what you do to survive.
Suck the venom out if you believe you will die.

I think that's better than dying.


Negative ghost rider...the sublingual area will end up absorbing way more of the poison a lot faster any bite.

To OP I'll check my sources and get back to you with good answer I don't want to give you off the top answer for a real issue.

It's not the "cowboy" solution above.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:05 PM
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Depends on the poison.
Generally you'd need a few bits & pieces (some you wouldn't be allowed to keep @ home):
An epipen (adrenaline shot).
Morphine & delivery system.
Ipecac solution.
Activated charcoal.
Amyl Nitrate inhalant.
Antivenin.
Blood pressure monitor.
Saline drip.
Pressure bandages.

Probably more...

and a knowledge of poisons and their treatment (ie: you need to get a few years training, too).



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


Wouldn't epinephrine cause the poison to spread even faster?



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by Golf66
 


You don't need to use your mouth to suck out venom, there are other ways, my snakebite kit has a suction tool, but you could also make something on the spot, or cover your mouth with something like dental dam. Also, there is a difference between "venom" and "poison." Most venoms are not dangerous to "ingest," they are only dangerous to "inject." If you left it in your mouth for too long it might be absorbed into the blood stream, but I think it is worth the risk if it helps your buddy or yourself. I would find some other way if at all possible.

I would say you are probably correct about the venom spreading quickly, but it would still be worthwhile to apply the tourniquet and suction. Depending on the strength of the venom, the dose that was injected, and the strength of the individual, maybe it would be just enough to save a life.

Suction would probably be very effective for spiders, if you know immediately when you get bit.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:10 PM
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I'd research which species of venomous animals are most prevalent in your area, as well as if there are any natural remedies available (medicinal herbs, etc.) in that area which are effective against those species, and of course venom extraction/isolation techniques.

Keeping a bite kit in your car or BOB wouldn't hurt either... or clinical antivenin if you can get your hands on it.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by DevilDog0311
 


Absolutely but if it has already hit the body core and is a heart-stopping neurotoxin, then you dont have a better option.

Also some toxins cause swellings (blocked airways & etc, like bee stings/peanut allergies & such). An epipen is just the ticket for that.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by Mizzijr
 


Surely there must be a helpline or something. Look on net in usa, or you could ring one in aussie land, as they probably have helplines too for being bitten or stung by something dangerous.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by Mizzijr
 


Well if you have recently ingested the poison, salt + water + swallow it = Throw it up.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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It depends on the level of the person's sensitivity as well. Some Herpetologist will actually administer doses of venom of the snakes that they tend in case they are accidentally bitten. The introduction of the venom at smaller doses allows the body to build an immunity to it.

It is usually advisable not to get bitten! As silly as that sounds, it is something that can be prevented. There are high boots for ankle bites, and there are calf wraps of leather for those who are in the field and moving though tall grass and brush. Sleeping in the open can often be met with a snake for a bed-partner. A dog is an excellent way of detecting those hidden dangers before they strike; of course the dog may require a bit of background training in order to know how to react, otherwise the dog may get bit.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


Ah okay. I see what your saying.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:16 PM
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You also have to be careful with a tourniquet. It is a delayer not a cure.

Often snake & spider bite victims have to have limbs amputated, not because of the poison, but because of the damage of having an arms mass of dead flesh hanging off the side of the patient.

Torniquets MUST be removed periodically to allow oxygenated blood into the limb or it will die.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


True, temporary delayer at best, and could create an issue even more dangerous than the original bite.

I would say first off that you must be certain it was a venomous bite, and that venom was actually injected. If you are not sure, then you could create damage where there was none. Next, I would say the tourniquet is only effective while you are attending the wound, and/or seeking out an antivenom. Definitely not for very long. The only exception would be if certain death were going to result from a bite, and then drastic measures are necessary, perhaps even amputation.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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I would recommend that you do a first aid/first responders course.

Here in NZ, it takes at least approx 12 minutes to get an ambulance/paramedic to a patient.

The maximum time to expire (with 100% certainty) in most emergencies averages out to about 8 minutes.

It doesn't take a maths genius to see.

It is vital and important that EVERYONE knows first aid!

(Hey, in some countries & jobs it can bump up your pay grade too).



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by Mizzijr
 


this is why i watch man vs. wild. bear grylls seems to think urinating on the bite wound tends to negate the poison. of course he does seem to drink his own urine alot. if you have access to internet, you can google the type of animal/insect and color of the specimen.



posted on Feb, 8 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Just took advantage of the wonderfrul world of the interwebz and ran across some utbe help.
First, I watched 4 different vids and they all say DO NOT SUCK or use a TOURNIQUET.


I know it's just utube, but there are some professionals on there too.

peace



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