Something Is Happening At Glacier Peak, Washington NOW (1/25/11)

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posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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I just posted this in my Washington State thread, but I think this is significant enough to make its own thread:


EDIT TO ADD: info on the volcano:

LINK TO INFO


Yet since the end of the last ice age, Glacier Peak has produced some of the largest and most explosive eruptions in the state. During this time period, Glacier Peak has erupted multiple times during at least six separate episodes, most recently about 300 years ago.





The largest ejected more than five times as much tephra as the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens and was one of the largest in the Cascade Range since the end of the last ice age.
Okay...this is happening at Glacier Peak. SE of Mount baker, slightly SE of my location.


I do not even normally pay attention to it...becuase it has been 'silent' for several years. Last quake there was in 07. HERE is the latest info on it.

This is scary stuff actually. It is very close to me and something is very definately happening there right NOW.

Thank you Annmarie for the heads up.

Check these seismos out...OH MAN...

EDIT TO ADD SCREEN SHOTS:










LINK

LINK

LINK

LINK
edit on 25-1-2011 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



Here are the sources for the above seismos:

PNSN map

PNSN list of volcanos
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edit on 25-1-2011 by westcoast because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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`bump

any experts?



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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Wow, it certainly looks like the earth is getting angry there...

Hope that it's just a hiccup but it sure looks like something is brewing for sure.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


I don't know much about reading these, but I'm assuming this isn't normal! A couple of those look scary, even to my untrained eye.

Keep us updated! Have you actually felt any quakes? I hope nothing big happens!



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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any chance of a map/graphics detailing its position to yellow stone, gulf of mexico and new madrid fault? would be cool..

and yes bump.

cheers dude.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 
I subscribe to the Yellowstone epic thread, but I still don't know crap from Shine-o-la about seismo readings.

Just how big is this event you are seeing there?



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Okay the first link was the seismo right on the volcano. It was a 12 hr view.

HERE is a 6 hr view



I still don't know what this may be.....maybe just a bit of a stretch after several years of sleeping? I'm not sure. We will have to wait and see what happens...but it has my hackles raised, that's for sure!!!!!



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by gemineye
reply to post by westcoast
 


I don't know much about reading these, but I'm assuming this isn't normal! A couple of those look scary, even to my untrained eye.

Keep us updated! Have you actually felt any quakes? I hope nothing big happens!


Curious about that myself: have you experienced any shaking or rumblings?

We east coast folks are getting weird almost sonic booms without the actual sound part, just more like a shockwave.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by WHOS READY
any chance of a map/graphics detailing its position to yellow stone, gulf of mexico and new madrid fault? would be cool..

and yes bump.

cheers dude.



We are a long ways off from Yellowstone. It is part of the Cascadia subduction zone/volcanic range. I'll be keeping a close eye on the other volcanos too, although Helens showed one can have a mega erruption without involving the others.

My concern is that we are seeing some massive HT there(at Glacier Peak), as well as smaller quakes, which would be expected of something was on the rise/move. I am hoping it is just a grumbe...but we have been having wierd little quakes around my area (that I have been commenting on), my dog has been freaking out with them (she is okay right now) and I can tell you that whenever you see these kinds of readings at a volcano, you better darn well pay CLOSE attention!!!

I am trying to find historical info on its erruption levels.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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Wow... that would have me a bit freaked out too!! Keep us posted!!



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:03 PM
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Here ya go. Not good.

ERRUPTION INFO ON GLACIER PEAK



Yet since the end of the last ice age, Glacier Peak has produced some of the largest and most explosive eruptions in the state. During this time period, Glacier Peak has erupted multiple times during at least six separate episodes, most recently about 300 years ago.



Glacier Peak lies only 70 miles northeast of Seattle÷closer to that city than any volcano except Mount Rainier. But unlike Mount Rainier, it rises only a few thousand feet above neighboring peaks, and from coastal communities it appears merely as a high point along a snowy saw-toothed skyline. Yet Glacier Peak has been one of the most active and explosive of Washington’s volcanoes.



Since the continental ice sheets receded from the region, Glacier Peak has erupted repeatedly during at least six episodes. Two of these eruptions were among the largest in Washington during the past 15,000 years.



Glacier Peak and Mount St. Helens are the only volcanoes in Washington State that have generated large, explosive eruptions in the past 15,000 years. Their violent behavior results from the type of molten rock (magma) they produce. Dacite, the typical magma type of Mount St. Helens and Glacier Peak, is too viscous to flow easily out of the eruptive vent; it must be pressed out under high pressure. As it approaches the surface, expanding gas bubbles within the magma burst and break it into countless fragments. These fragments are collectively known as tephra; the smallest are called ash.



The largest ejected more than five times as much tephra as the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens and was one of the largest in the Cascade Range since the end of the last ice age.



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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It seems to have gone silent for the moment. Let's hope it stays that way. If nothing else, I think this is going to garner the volcano a whole bunch of attention!



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:20 PM
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I was looking at the USGS site just a few minutes ago, and they have nothing.


CASCADE RANGE VOLCANOES
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Activity Update: All volcanoes in the Cascade Range are at normal levels of background seismicity. These include Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Adams in Washington State; Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, Three Sisters, Newberry Volcano, and Crater Lake, in Oregon; and Medicine Lake volcano, Mount Shasta, and Lassen Peak in northern California.

Recent Observations: No changes. Monitoring systems show that activity at Cascade Range volcanoes during the past week remains at background levels.


volcanoes.usgs.gov...

but it looks like they haven't updated since the 21st



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:22 PM
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Looks ok at the moment, I think. Webcam



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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The USGS is reporting a 1.9 magnitude earthquake very near Seattle at 1:54. I know that's not exactly Glacier Peak, but it could be responsible, or at least related, especially considering the timing.

earthquake.usgs.gov...



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by Tzavros
 


Can't see much right now with all the cloud coverage....I really wouldn't expect to see anything right now anyways (at least I would HOPE not, or its a lot worse than I think)

Thanks for the link, BTW. I've added it to my favorites



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


HERE is a link to a seismo very close to the epicenter of the 1.9. It doesn't even show up.

I think it is a good idea definately. I had already compared them...there is NO way it would show up on glacier peak that like that though, IMO. Especially not for that duration either.


Edit to add: if you look at the 6 hour seismo I supplied for Glacier peak, you can see the small quake at 2154 UTC. It is absolutely dwarfed in comparison.
edit on 25-1-2011 by westcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by westcoast
 


Hm. The USGS report is the early computer-generated version, so it hasn't been checked yet. Maybe the earthquake was closer to Glacier Peak. It might also be related in other ways, even if the two events aren't one and the same. I'm mainly interested in the timing being so close.

EDIT: seeing what you just wrote, I still think they might be related, but they're certainly not the same event...obviously. I'm not an expert on how earthquakes from one area can be related to volcanic/seismic activity in another, but the least it's going to do is show that it's not just isolated to the Glacier Peak area...it seems to be a bit more broad than that.
edit on 25-1-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 04:38 PM
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I too was going to mention the Seattle quake even tho I doubt its connected. Could the harmonic tremors be wind? I don't blame you for your concern - please keep us updated as to what you find out?



posted on Jan, 25 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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Doesn't look like wind. WAYYYY too big for that, IMO.

Puterman is looking into it for me.

I don't think there is any question that the 1.9 quake shows up AFTER the much larger, local event on the mountain. PNSN has not updated their quake list yet for Glacier, but I expect that to happen. There is a decent sized quake (2.0 or so) hidden in among all that 'noise'....I hope this is over for now, but it may be indicating something very worthy of looking into.





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