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8m Asteroid comming very close to earth Monday Jan 17.

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posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 02:08 PM
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Its not 8 miles.... 8 meters. Barely enough to do real damage to consider a "catastrophic event". But from what I was saying before, anyone else use timewave zero? Is it just me or does it actually show a steep decline for Jan 17th of this year. Who knows, it is a guesstimate program. Not that anything will happen, just neat to see what others think




posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Lansky
 


Awwww - ya got me, had a senior moment, lol.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by Chefspicy
 
It is just 8 milometers not miles. It is only a big problem it if is km. We are passing through a comet swarm that is over lapped with another comet swarm, that puts our earth in bulls eye. I wrote a book about it Epoch Revelations, but will never be able to print it but it is online free to read what wasn't stolen. The earth will be in this comet swarm from 2007 to 2014. Many UFO sightings are from this swarm and the government would rather you believe it is a UFO than an astroid. All talk of these objects coming toward earth is now classified.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by coolottie
reply to post by Chefspicy
 
It is just 8 milometers not miles. It is only a big problem it if is km. We are passing through a comet swarm that is over lapped with another comet swarm, that puts our earth in bulls eye. I wrote a book about it Epoch Revelations, but will never be able to print it but it is online free to read what wasn't stolen. The earth will be in this comet swarm from 2007 to 2014. Many UFO sightings are from this swarm and the government would rather you believe it is a UFO than an astroid. All talk of these objects coming toward earth is now classified.



8 miles, 8 meters and now 8 milometers, this thing is shrinking..



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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Originally posted by backinblack

Originally posted by coolottie
reply to post by Chefspicy
 
It is just 8 milometers not miles. It is only a big problem it if is km. We are passing through a comet swarm that is over lapped with another comet swarm, that puts our earth in bulls eye. I wrote a book about it Epoch Revelations, but will never be able to print it but it is online free to read what wasn't stolen. The earth will be in this comet swarm from 2007 to 2014. Many UFO sightings are from this swarm and the government would rather you believe it is a UFO than an astroid. All talk of these objects coming toward earth is now classified.



8 miles, 8 meters and now 8 milometers, this thing is shrinking..



i think it has entered the atmosphere and impacted.. i can see a spec of dust on the top of my monitor and im pretty sure that it is the asteroid.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 03:11 PM
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Originally posted by Chefspicy

with solar storms hitting the earth magnetic field, and this,"polar shift" could this in anyway maybe maybe stop the earth from protecting its self from asteroids, from the magnetic field , isn't that how it works, it repels whatever objects, or sucks them in, right ??

ChefSpicy
edit on 15-1-2011 by Chefspicy because: spelling


I don't think the magnetic field protects against asteroids, I think it just repels electromagnetic particles from the solar wind.

Most smaller asteroids would burn in the atmosphere as a result of friction.

Could be wrong but I think that's how it works



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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8 metres is not that big, but it's not that small either. 45m to 72m ?? is the estimated size of the Tunguska "rock" Kudos to the the OP for having the info yesterday, I did not see it yesterday at Spaceweather.com in my time zone...as it was not there. That's the point, this boyo is Johnny come lately, and it happens all the time. It's not scaremongering it is a fact that there is not always a long-term forecast for these objects, especially the smaller ones. It could have been on the NASA site earlier however. Maybe this helps,

blogs.nature.com...
edit on 16-1-2011 by smurfy because: Add link.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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it wont be on the news, and the government will not report on it, if they did what do you think exactly will happen, riots - wars - looting , all this and more ..... bye bye gvt




Originally posted by mattyboy4u
So,
New on the forums (although been reading through them for about a week straight now
. Anyways, a quick reply to this subject. On the NASA sight it says "LD means "Lunar Distance." 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon" so this meteor being 0.8 of 1 LD means it is going to be quite far from Earth itself. Although, since reading the post fully, I am now a fan of using the program TimeWave Zero and after looking at it again (I had the 17th in my mind already), there is a spot on the 17th that shows something happening. Who knows, I guess we shall wait and see. I would think though, that if the crash were imminent it would be on the news by now as well. But then again, calculations in space can be wrong :\. We shall see



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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This isn't news! This stuff happens all the time. This 8m asteroid/meteor is going to burn up in the atmosphere, and MAYBE a piece the size of a basketball will make it to the ground.

If it hits nearby, you better jump on retrieving it though. They are worth a LOT of money, and even more if they are very freshly impacted.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 05:58 PM
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Seitler,
It does happen all the time as you say, and so does NASA. But they also say that these things approach unseen, usually because the approach is incoming via the sun. They don't say often enough that they are unseen because nobody saw it. Asteroid watches are in place but not in a high profile until some money is thrown at it, I suppose NASA also would say amen to that.
edit on 16-1-2011 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by zcflint05
A ELE-type asteroid would not be able to be hidden by NASA however...simple fact is something that big would be easily discovered by amatuer astronomers.


Not true. They are still trying to map all potential 'civilisation killers' and are by no means near to having found them all. If anything, the issue has not been taken seriously enough in the corridors of power as NASA and other space agencies globally do not get enough funding.

Trust me, there are some nasty NEO's out there that could do a lot of damage were they to strike - and we don't even know where they are. In fact, there was even one a year or two ago that crept up out of nowhere and was only spotted about 24-48 hours before it flew past, and that one was within 1.00 LD of the Earth.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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26 Feet would be just under 8 meters. Or the asteroid would be the size of this Hello Kitty in this video for those interested.


www.youtube.com...



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Connman
26 Feet would be just under 8 meters. Or the asteroid would be the size of this Hello Kitty in this video for those interested.


www.youtube.com...


Even kitty travelling at 47000 mph would scratch you a bit, well not really as she would have ceased to exist from the state you describe. It is probably correct though to think that most Asteroids are not a complete stable solid as in one virgin piece of rock as they are remnants of collisions, or multiple collisions, but there is no way of telling until that "kitty" hits you in the face.



posted on Jan, 16 2011 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by rufusthestuntbum

I don't think the magnetic field protects against asteroids, I think it just repels electromagnetic particles from the solar wind.


It does, indirectly. The magnetic field stops our atmosphere being stripped away by the solar wind, and without an atmosphere we would be exposed to many more dangerous impacts.

However, it would take a very long time for the atmosphere to be stripped away, much longer than polar shift is thought to take, so I would not worry too much about it.


Originally posted by rufusthestuntbum

Most smaller asteroids would burn in the atmosphere as a result of friction.

Could be wrong but I think that's how it works


Close, but not 100% correct...

You are right in saying that most small asteroids do not make it through our atmosphere, but, contrary to popular belief, friction plays very little part in diminishing the size of a meteoroid passing though our atmosphere at hyper-velocity speeds.

Also, a meteoroid does not burn, it is ablated:


ab-la-tion
Pronunciation [a-bley-shuhn]

–noun
1. the removal, esp. of organs, abnormal growths, or harmful substances, from the body by mechanical means, as by surgery.
2. the reduction in volume of glacial ice, snow, or névé by the combined processes of melting, evaporation, and calving. Compare alimentation (def. 3).
3. Aerospace. erosion of the protective outer surface (ablator) of a spacecraft or missile due to the aerodynamic heating caused by travel at hypersonic speed during reentry through the atmosphere.

Source: dictionary.reference.com




edit on 16-1-2011 by C.H.U.D. because: broken link



posted on Jan, 17 2011 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by C.H.U.D.

Originally posted by rufusthestuntbum

I don't think the magnetic field protects against asteroids, I think it just repels electromagnetic particles from the solar wind.


It does, indirectly. The magnetic field stops our atmosphere being stripped away by the solar wind, and without an atmosphere we would be exposed to many more dangerous impacts.

However, it would take a very long time for the atmosphere to be stripped away, much longer than polar shift is thought to take, so I would not worry too much about it.


Originally posted by rufusthestuntbum

Most smaller asteroids would burn in the atmosphere as a result of friction.

Could be wrong but I think that's how it works


Close, but not 100% correct...

You are right in saying that most small asteroids do not make it through our atmosphere, but, contrary to popular belief, friction plays very little part in diminishing the size of a meteoroid passing though our atmosphere at hyper-velocity speeds.

Also, a meteoroid does not burn, it is ablated:


ab-la-tion
Pronunciation [a-bley-shuhn]

–noun
1. the removal, esp. of organs, abnormal growths, or harmful substances, from the body by mechanical means, as by surgery.
2. the reduction in volume of glacial ice, snow, or névé by the combined processes of melting, evaporation, and calving. Compare alimentation (def. 3).
3. Aerospace. erosion of the protective outer surface (ablator) of a spacecraft or missile due to the aerodynamic heating caused by travel at hypersonic speed during reentry through the atmosphere.

Source: dictionary.reference.com




edit on 16-1-2011 by C.H.U.D. because: broken link


That is correct as we are told and makes sense. But still, a solid piece of rock this size and mass, is not a bit of gravel, more like 20 tonnes in weight alone. Add the speed, and minus any burnup, it would still be a considerable force.



posted on Jan, 18 2011 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by smurfy
But still, a solid piece of rock this size and mass, is not a bit of gravel, more like 20 tonnes in weight alone. Add the speed, and minus any burnup, it would still be a considerable force.



You are quite correct that an 8m rock would have considerable energy, but even that is relatively small in the great scheme of things, although it might seem big to you and me. Of course, what happens will depend on various factors, not least of which are speed, size and angle of entry, but also composition/density also play a huge part.

Excepting the larger sized iron/nickel objects (which are rare), even the harder denser rocky objects don't stand much chance against our atmosphere, which is surprisingly good at slowing down huge objects and absorbing massive amounts of energy.

Lets look at an example. If you go to Impact Earth and enter in a couple of numbers, It'll calculate the effects of your object.

I used 16 meters to show that even objects of double the size we are talking about here have a hard time doing any damage on the ground.The only other parameters I tweaked were the speed, which I upped to 20 km/s (which is a mid-range value for an asteroid), and I set the material density to "dense rock".

These are the resulting effects that it calculated:

The projectile begins to breakup at an altitude of 56600 meters = 186000 ft
The projectile bursts into a cloud of fragments at an altitude of 24300 meters = 79800 ft.
The residual velocity of the projectile fragments after the burst is 13.6 km/s = 8.45 miles/s.
The energy of the airburst is 6.91 x 10^14 Joules = 0.16 x 10^0 MegaTons.
No crater is formed, although large fragments may strike the surface.


There is some good info on the subject in the AMS fireball FAQ

12. How fast are meteorites traveling when they reach the ground?

Meteoroids enter the earth’s atmosphere at very high speeds, ranging from 11 km/sec to 72 km/sec (25,000 mph to 160,000 mph). However, similar to firing a bullet into water, the meteoroid will rapidly decelerate as it penetrates into increasingly denser portions of the atmosphere. This is especially true in the lower layers, since 90 % of the earth’s atmospheric mass lies below 12 km (7 miles / 39,000 ft) of height.

At the same time, the meteoroid will also rapidly lose mass due to ablation. In this process, the outer layer of the meteoroid is continuously vaporized and stripped away due to high speed collision with air molecules. Particles from dust size to a few kilograms mass are usually completely consumed in the atmosphere.

Due to atmospheric drag, most meteorites, ranging from a few kilograms up to about 8 tons (7,000 kg), will lose all of their cosmic velocity while still several miles up. At that point, called the retardation point, the meteorite begins to accelerate again, under the influence of the Earth’s gravity, at the familiar 9.8 meters per second squared. The meteorite then quickly reaches its terminal velocity of 200 to 400 miles per hour (90 to 180 meters per second). The terminal velocity occurs at the point where the acceleration due to gravity is exactly offset by the deceleration due to atmospheric drag.

Meteoroids of more than about 10 tons (9,000 kg) will retain a portion of their original speed, or cosmic velocity, all the way to the surface. A 10-ton meteroid entering the Earth’s atmosphere perpendicular to the surface will retain about 6% of its cosmic velocity on arrival at the surface. For example, if the meteoroid started at 25 miles per second (40 km/s) it would (if it survived its atmospheric passage intact) arrive at the surface still moving at 1.5 miles per second (2.4 km/s), packing (after considerable mass loss due to ablation) some 13 gigajoules of kinetic energy.

On the very large end of the scale, a meteoroid of 1000 tons (9 x 10^5 kg) would retain about 70% of its cosmic velocity, and bodies of over 100,000 tons or so will cut through the atmosphere as if it were not even there. Luckily, such events are extraordinarily rare.



We get hit by meter sized rocks thousands of times a day probably, but every time you double that diameter, the mass of the object increases exponentially, and so does the frequency at which we encounter them. So by the time we get into the range at which these things can cause serious localized damage (100 meters+), they are rare enough that Earth only encounters objects of that size every few hundred years.

Earth makes a small target too, so when you hear about a close approach being "only" 1 LD away, that's actually not that close. If Earth is the size of a pin head, then the distance to the moon would be something like 500 meters. On that scale a large asteroid would be microscopic, and the chances of two tiny particles interacting on this scale are also microscopic.

So to sum up, although in theory we could get hit by something fairly big (big enough to cause harm to people), the odds are stacked in favour of us not being hit any time in the near future.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by C.H.U.D.
 


Thank you for make this last post. I watch a lot of specials on, and read a lot about astroids/meteors, but am terrible at citing information. OR having the drive to search all of this information. You did a great job in explaining and showing some good facts.

Like I said before... this is simply another 8m meteor/astroid... ball of rock and/or ice. IF it hits Earth, it will just smash in harmlessly (speaking on a global scale) or blow up (melt and gas expansion) in the atmosphere, or just above the ground at about 0.5 - 1.5 miles.



posted on Jan, 19 2011 @ 10:47 PM
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What I would like to know - will we be able to see it? When, where and how - does anyone know? I live among a lot of trees and its been super cloudy for weeks now. Probably no chance for me to see it but if I knew the direction and time I would be looking.



posted on Jan, 20 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by crazydaisy
What I would like to know - will we be able to see it? When, where and how - does anyone know? I live among a lot of trees and its been super cloudy for weeks now. Probably no chance for me to see it but if I knew the direction and time I would be looking.


If you have a dark enough sky you might be able to make it out with the naked eye - it'll probably look like a dim fuzzy star if the brightness predictions are correct.




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