I am suing Citimortgage.....follow along as I hang these bastards.

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posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by Scalded Frog
 


That is good information Scalded Frog. I see banks working with people underwater, while going after people with equity in their home. The bank has been paid at least three times by the time it gets to foreclosure. If anyone has MIP and files a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, your loan is paid in full by the insurance company....but they still continue to charge you (if you retain the property).




posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by lostviking
 


go get em tiger ,

ive had my fare share of fraudulent bank cases ,
all you really have to do is keep everything they ve sent you and maintain your position ,

in one of my latest escapades the court even said they had no legal right to revoke my loan i had ,
so the bank then took my loan and put the goverment as the backup fellow and supended the loan ,

a long story short , they ended up loosing more money throu the legal system then what the original loan was ,
i payed my loan back with full intrest but they lost around 20k in legal fees ,

just bad entropy



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 10:00 PM
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reply to post by thegoodearth
 


Your damn right they want the homes.
Some of the questions on the census and worse, the community survey can only be social engineering in the making.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 05:05 AM
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wow
what a load of a bull#
not you.. the bank!
how can they be getting away with this
and by the sounds of it, it seems pretty common?
is this just in america?
good on you man, and good luck !
x



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 05:05 AM
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wow
what a load of a bull#
not you.. the bank!
how can they be getting away with this
and by the sounds of it, it seems pretty common?
is this just in america?
good on you man, and good luck !
x



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 05:22 AM
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Go get them I had an ordeal with citibank after a divorce I agreed to make payments to pay off one of there credit cards I gave them my routing number and after making timely payments on my last payment they went into my account and took 10k without my authorization. They basically renigged on their own agreement.I should never have given them my info.

Good Luck screw them hard!



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 05:42 AM
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the best of fortune to you lostviking
being someone who lost their home in the 90's and rendered homeless i can understand the frustration this is causing you. your post will be followed with interest from the other side of the pond (uk).

f



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 05:55 AM
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Produce the note you b@stards! Do they even have the note or is your original note sitting in some vault in Saudi Arabia or completely destroyed?

MAKE THEM prove that they are the legal holders of the mortgage. they might just be the 'servicing' bank (specially if mers is involved)



During the lending boom, most mortgages were flipped and sold to another lender or servicer or sliced up and sold to investors as securitized packages on Wall Street. In the rush to turn these over as fast as possible to make the most money, many of the new lenders did not get the proper paperwork to show they own the note and mortgage. This is the key to the produce the note strategy. Now, many lenders are moving to foreclose on homeowners, resulting in part from problems they created, and don’t have the proper paperwork to prove they have a right to foreclose.


Learn How To Produce The Note



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 06:09 AM
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Originally posted by incontenant
Go get them I had an ordeal with citibank after a divorce I agreed to make payments to pay off one of there credit cards I gave them my routing number and after making timely payments on my last payment they went into my account and took 10k without my authorization. They basically renigged on their own agreement.I should never have given them my info.

Good Luck screw them hard!


Was your bank account also with citibank? If so, usually in the fine print is something called the right of offset. It basically means they can take from your account(s) with them to pay loans or credit cards you haven't paid. What did they say the 10k was for?



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 07:05 AM
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good luck and keep us informed



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 08:50 AM
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reply to post by lostviking
 



The your intentions are great and I would do the same but I have one question to make or maybe two.

First.

You said you had the money to pay the morgage.

Did you stop paying intentionally so you could try to refianance and get a better deal?

Remeber your a nobody only poloticians can do that stuff and get away with it.


If you intentianally stopped paying to defraud them into thinking you could not afford you morgage even though you could.

They probably reseached you and saw that you still were able to pay and stopped. And that is why they are sticking it to you.


Sorry Had to ask.

Good luck with the suit. Unfurtunately you will loose becasue the are all in on it together.

I was told when I got laid off to stop paying my morgage. But I didnt.

I paid 260,000 for my house and it is assesed at 460,000 which is what I could get fopr it if I put it on the market today..

Now a bank would look at my property and say holy crap. If we get this house look it all our bonus money. Yes the get some...

I took money out of savings which took me over 15 years to save to prevent any interuption in payments. Now that I'm back to work I have been trying to recover my savings.

Good Luck....



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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good luck.
this is just me, but I think when a bank srews up horribly, that should be considered a breach in contract, and they forfeit the house to the owner. there needs to be risk to the banks, and they should make sure they get it right with everyone.

i hope you win



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by thecinic
 


i just find this situation utterly diabolical and disgusting! they foreclose you on purpose, so that the next poor sod that comes along to buy the home will end up recieveing the same treatment, they make thousands but still retain the property.

and im sure its not just you and not just that company thats doing it.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by Myendica
good luck.
this is just me, but I think when a bank srews up horribly, that should be considered a breach in contract, and they forfeit the house to the owner. there needs to be risk to the banks, and they should make sure they get it right with everyone.

i hope you win


There IS a risk to the banks. That you will default on the mortgage and they will have to foreclose, which in some states is a very long and expensive process which can be halted at the last minute by the homeowner filing bankruptcy. Most people are making the large banks out to be criminals, and I agree to a certain extent. What about the local community bank that lends responsibly, employs locals and keeps their loans in their own portfolio? Should they be penalized and lose money because someone lost their job and can't pay or doesn't want to dip into savings and then files bankruptcy to delay the foreclosure. The fruad and abuse works both ways and is happening on both the lender and the homeowner ends. A few posts earlier was a perfect example of how to handle the situation....they dipped into their savings in order to keep paying the mortgage. It sucks and no one wants to do it. I was forced to do the same thing earlier this year when I lost my job. I got through it and eventually sold my house and made money in the end. Was it easy, no. Was it worth it, yes. If anything my kids learned a valuable lesson.
edit on 30-11-2010 by peter_kandra because: typos



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 09:15 AM
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It is amazing how many people this is happening to. It happened to my aunt a few years ago, she took them to court but to no avail. She still lost her house and land all due the crooked nature of the banks

Not only that but a person with an income of 200 dollars a week can walk into a bank and get a loan for 30,000 with NO equity. But someone like me who has a 2000 square foot house and five acres of land, all paid for, plus a very stable income cannot get a 5000 dollar home improvement loan to redo the wiring in the house.

Six months after applying and being denied for the loan our house burned down in the middle of the night. Me, my husband and the then nine month old twins had to jump out the bedroom window in order to make it out. The cause of the fire? Bad wiring.

When we got the insurance money we bought and paid cash for a new house, took the remainder out of the bank and basically stuck it in the mattress. I hate banks for what they do to people. The cheat the hard working people while steadiy giving the people that miss payment after payment extensions.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 09:28 AM
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reply to post by lostviking
 


Everyone - Here is some background info:

This is the absolute MUST read: DOLLAR DECEPTION:
HOW BANKS SECRETLY CREATE MONEY
It includes the landmark "First National Bank of Montgomery vs. Daly (1969) was a courtroom drama worthy of a movie script.3 Defendant Jerome Daly opposed the bank's foreclosure on his $14,000 home mortgage loan on the ground that there was no consideration for the loan...."[/i}
www.webofdebt.com...

The truth behind the "Bank bailouts" www.democracynow.org...

You will love this one
LET THE LAWSUITS BEGIN: BANKS BRACE FOR A STORM OF LITIGATION
the real reason for the subprime bailout schemes being proposed by the U.S. Treasury Department was not to keep strapped borrowers in their homes so much as to stave off a spate of lawsuits against the banks.
www.webofdebt.com...



...Senior investors, who are typically financial institutions, own the AAA tranches that are insured against default by AIG, and they WANT to foreclose on the Middle Class so that insurance payments kick in. Conversely, the junior tranche investors want workouts with homeowners because their investment is not insured.
 
“To ensure that the mortgage servicer pushes default instead of workout, the servicer is paid double (50 basis points versus 25 basis points) by the MBS to service a loan in default. Why do you think your servicer tells you that you must be in default before it will consider a mortgage modification, a practice known as invited default?
 
“Simply put,” says Parker, “the government bailout of AIG has actually encouraged foreclosures because the taxpayers continue to fill AIG’s coffers with enough cash to pay out insurance on defaulted home loans.”

...CDS premium revenue is not restricted to those who might have actual losses or real assets to protect. You can bet as much as you want and create as many CDS as you want....
www.realtytrac.com...

In other words there maybe more than one CDS on a mortgage and therefore it is much more profitable to collect the multiple payoffs [from us taxpayers] than to refinance the mortgage.



....One of the regulators’ most controversial decisions was awarding the banks that were A.I.G.’s trading partners 100 cents on the dollar to unwind debt insurance they had bought from the firm. Critics have questioned why the government did not try to wring more concessions from the banks, which would have saved taxpayers billions of dollars.

Mr. Geithner, who is now the Treasury secretary, has repeatedly said that as steward of the New York Fed, he had no choice but to pay A.I.G.’s trading partners in full....
thepatriotswar.com...



The Big Takeover: How Wall Street Insiders are Using the Bailout to Stage a Revolution: The global economic crisis isn't about money - it's about power.
by Matt Taibbi
www.commondreams.org...

The debt from a credit card company has been bought and sold so many times that in many cases the collection agency has no legal proof that they own the debt or that you owe the debt. Without that proof they are NOT entitled to collect it from you.
hubpages.com...



Banks typically have 3% of their assets in cash in order to meet customer needs. Since 1960, banks have been allowed to use this “vault cash” to satisfy their reserve requirements. Today, bank reserve requirements have fallen to the point where they are now exceeded by vault cash, which means lowering reserve requirements to zero would have virtually no impact on the banking system. US banks are already operating free of any reserve constraints.
www.marketskeptics.com...


The Banksters have been stealing this country blind for a century and giving NOTHING in return.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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I have a similar situation with CITIfinancial.

Basically, a $5000 loan that I paid over $200 a month for roughly 3 years.

I'm not very good with math so I really have no idea how much I payed them back.

I lost my job and quit paying them.

I told them to come get the car and they failed to do so even though they knew right where it was and threatened to come get it many times.

When I moved I left the car there and told them once again where it was and to come get it.

Once again they failed to do so.

The city ended up towing it.

They started calling again recently after not hearing from them for years and now tell me I owe them $8000.

I don't f'ing think so!

Anymore, I only answer the phone when I know the number because the few times I have talked to them ended with me telling them to kiss my a** and hanging up.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by lostviking
reply to post by thegoodearth
 

What BOA is doing is illegal. They are now demonstrating bad faith in misapplying payments. Document everything, and go see an attorney immediately that provides free consultations. Usually a few letters from an attorney is all it takes to stop BOA from doing this type of thing.


Did you also contact the Office of the Comptroller of Coin and Currency? When my father passed away, my mother was in a bind and the bank tried to call in a loan and she had always made the payments faithfully.



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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Best of luck to you
I hope you win and stick it to them!



posted on Nov, 30 2010 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by lostviking
 


You'll get your money back, for sure. When people takes corporations to court they often use cheap lawyers who don't know the law as good as those 5 power attorneys. If you have a good lawyer and the funds to pay him than you should get your money reimbursed, plus attorney fees, plus interest if they were supposed to return your money due to breach of contract.

That is to say that you did have a written contract in place, if not, than it would be a he said she said moment where it will be hard to prove they were negligent or trying to screw you.

Best of luck!





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