It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Does movement through space create time?

page: 2
7
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:09 AM
link   
I'm pretty sure it has been shown that travelling around the world in a really fast jet will cause time dilation. Meaning the clock on the jet will slightly differ from real world time...I think...maybe someone can be more specific...




posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:14 AM
link   
reply to post by watchitburn
 


I dont think time is a perception. Stuff like atoms, molecules etc... would still change and decay as "time" passes by. Time is a perception of how we interpret change in our environment, world Universe so in that definition perception works but it "time" happens with or without human perception of it. Unless you want to go into some really out there thinking which could be reality but has virtually no supportive or observible evidence beyond our thoughts.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:16 AM
link   
reply to post by WhizPhiz
 


They put an atomic clock on concord once to prove this. I am trying to fin a link,

Hafele and Keating Experiment
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...

"During October, 1971, four cesium atomic beam clocks were flown on regularly scheduled commercial jet flights around the world twice, once eastward and once westward, to test Einstein's theory of relativity with macroscopic clocks. From the actual flight paths of each trip, the theory predicted that the flying clocks, compared with reference clocks at the U.S. Naval Observatory, should have lost 40+/-23 nanoseconds during the eastward trip and should have gained 275+/-21 nanoseconds during the westward trip ... Relative to the atomic time scale of the U.S. Naval Observatory, the flying clocks lost 59+/-10 nanoseconds during the eastward trip and gained 273+/-7 nanosecond during the westward trip, where the errors are the corresponding standard deviations. These results provide an unambiguous empirical resolution of the famous clock "paradox" with macroscopic clocks."

J.C. Hafele and R. E. Keating, Science 177, 166 (1972)

edit on 17-11-2010 by tarifa37 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:18 AM
link   
reply to post by tarifa37
 




They put an atomic clock on concord once to prove this.

Yes, that's the experiment I'm talking about. I thought it was a concord and atomic clock they used, but I wasn't sure, so I tried not to be too specific. Haven't taken physics classes in a while.
Anyway, hope you find the link, I can't be bothered looking.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:20 AM
link   

Originally posted by WhizPhiz
I'm pretty sure it has been shown that travelling around the world in a really fast jet will cause time dilation. Meaning the clock on the jet will slightly differ from real world time...I think...maybe someone can be more specific...


There have been many experiments. In fact they have tgo constantly update the GPS satelites time because of time dilation. Here is a link to some info.

A number of experiments exist which appear to support SR time dilation. They are:



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by Xeven
I am curious if movement through space actually causes time to exist? The faster you move through space the slower time acts on the objects moving. It would seem to me if you slow down time would speed up.

But what if you stoped in relation to space? If you lanched a probe and sent it directly away from the path of our Galaxy to the point where it was at rest in space in relation to the speed our galaxy moves or in relation to the speed of light, would time even exist?

If that probe had a telescope what would it see in a place where time does not exist? Seems like this would be an easy experiment to test. if you turned on a laser on this probe would it even emit light or would that light be traped due to time not existing like in a black hole?

If an object is not moving in relation to space does time exist?



Movement through space does not "create time" but the movement through space can effect time. All things move through space, and space and time are connected. The faster you move through space the slower time seems to pass (for you). The slower you move through space the faster time seems to go (for you). You could say that the distance between two objects is time. And you could say that the substance between two object is space. So then at some point, time and space do not move or change, but the motion through either will effect both at the same time.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:31 AM
link   
The question you are asking cannot be answered, Not yet anyways. Here is a link with info you may find enlightening.

discovermagazine.com...

Seems we are close to a new theory of time and space but Only time will tell



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:35 AM
link   
Xeven... that wasn't me who posted a link, was it? If it was I have a very bad short term memory.

the idea that it all started with a nudge and not a huge explosion is interesting indeed... but could you imagine how long it would take for just one nudge to create all that energy? God must be really damn old.

About the clocks, that is very interesting. how in the hell would that even be possible? I'm not even going to theorize. I guess I will read the ideas that they have already come up with if it's in short format.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:41 AM
link   
reply to post by ThePeopleParty
 


Concepts of time have always fascinated me perhaps because it was so hard for me to wrap my head around it. This is off topic, but your number dyslexia does exist and it's called dyscalculia. It was hard for me to understand time or read analog clocks until I got older, too, lol, and I still only buy digital clocks if I have the choice. I was also bad in maths (my first failed class in my life was honors physics, my brain wouldn't process it for the life of me, yet I love reading about theoretical physics) and the only thing I could do relatively well was geometry, which is true of most people with dyscalculia. I was good at everything else in school though. It's a bizarre learning disability that often goes undiagnosed, but I do think it's related to dyslexia, as one of my parents has dyslexia but is exceptional at math. Sorry for the off-topic post, I'm just lurking here because I like reading people's thoughts on space and time.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:47 AM
link   
The thing with the clocks are errors. Don't ask me to show you the errors but they are errors. I'm certain of it... there is no other way to explain it, perhaps not in the math but in somewhere.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 09:56 AM
link   
You've got to love that relativity!

If a star is travelling away from the big bang at some crazy speed, will the light pointing towards the big bang be slower than the light travelling out from the other side of the star or would it be the same?



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:01 AM
link   
Since it seems Tarifa didn't come through with those links, here we are:

secure.wikimedia.org...
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...

EDIT: Oh, my bad, I missed the edit!
edit on 17-11-2010 by WhizPhiz because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:08 AM
link   

Originally posted by Tykonos
You've got to love that relativity!

If a star is travelling away from the big bang at some crazy speed, will the light pointing towards the big bang be slower than the light travelling out from the other side of the star or would it be the same?


depends on what's obstructing it?... and don't ask me what that would be.

I just went back to look at the theory of relativity. I'm not getting this time dilation stuff. How can time itself speed up or slow down? I thought time dilation was a simpler concept regarding the relevance of time on different planetary bodies. I didn't know it could "act"

I'm going to have to think about that some more... or perhaps never again might be a better option.
edit on 17-11-2010 by ChaosMagician because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:11 AM
link   
reply to post by Xeven
 


Time is a concept invented my mankind, so that travel by sea could be accomplished. Also used to make a work period. Ancient mankind/womankind had no concept of time, and ET being have no concept of time, only man has it. So, in essence, travel through space would create time, but only to the human aboard the craft. That is my take on this.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:13 AM
link   
reply to post by Xeven
 


They say there is something similar to "Moores law" that would limit the speed of our computer processors to 10^44 hertz because of a Planck time limit(within a given frame of reference).

So according to the children's tale we can hop into our paradox twins space capsule and take a ride to Vega or beyond to kill some time. Traveling close enough to the speed of light, time on the capsule appears to stop from the perspective of those back on earth that are running your computer job.

You return to earth after your long trip and find that everybody is dead, but your computer job is done and they left you a bottle of peach Nehi.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:16 AM
link   
reply to post by ChaosMagician
 

Yeah it's a bit of a mind melt.

Like alot of physics.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by tarifa37
reply to post by Seventytwo
 


I think of time as being two things , the first being our perception of it, i.e feeling the passage of time counting out a minute in seconds sitting through a boring film etc. The second is the effect time has on us and objects matter etc. In other words decay. We and almost everything around us is suffering from decay caused by not time itself but elements such as oxygen rust mould whatever causes an object to decay. Therefore if you placed a gold bar that doesn't decay or tarnish in a vacuum time would stand still for that gold bar. I think It would be impossible to tell how long it had been in the vacuum without it being monitored from the start.



If you think about perception:
it is when there is not enough time or too much time.

Why does one hour trapped in an elevator last longer than a one hour lunch break
?



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by Tykonos
reply to post by ChaosMagician
 

Yeah it's a bit of a mind melt.

Like alot of physics.



I think it's flat out wrong.

Like a lot of physics... but yeah, I am no physicist.



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:55 AM
link   
Space Time Continuum

In physics, spacetime (or space–time; or space/time) is any mathematical model that combines space and time into a single continuum. Spacetime is usually interpreted with space being three-dimensional and time playing the role of a fourth dimension that is of a different sort from the spatial dimensions. According to certain Euclidean space perceptions, the universe has three dimensions of space and one dimension of time. By combining space and time into a single manifold, physicists have significantly simplified a large number of physical theories, as well as described in a more uniform way the workings of the universe at both the supergalactic and subatomic levels


en.wikipedia.org...


Space and time combines into a single continuum, time being the fourth dimension, this is mathematical theory is interesting, you may want to check out Dr. Lanza's work, he said that nothing exist unless it's observed, I would assume that includes time.


Rewriteing the Past

The past is set in stone, right? Everything we have learned tells us that you can not change the past, 88-MPH DeLoreans notwithstanding.

However, it would probably surprise you to learn that many highly respected scientists, as well as a few out on the fringe, are questioning that assumption, based on real evidence.

For example, leading stem cell scientist, Dr. Robert Lanza, posits that the past does not really exist until properly observed. His theory of Biocentrism says that the past is just as malleable as the future.



www.theuniversesolved.com...



posted on Nov, 17 2010 @ 10:56 AM
link   
I came across this study a while ago that showed how just our observation of atoms or molecules effected how they reacted to certain stimulis. I dont have time to look for it now, but I will look later and post.



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join