It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

When will Mexico start being accountable and stop expecting America to do all the work?

page: 3
4
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 01:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by daskakik
reply to post by Oldnslo
 


Sorry but I just went over the Costa Rican immigration law and the only place I see a prison sentence in that law is for traffickers.

Costa Rican immigration law (in spanish)


ARTÍCULO 249.- Se impondrá pena de prisión de dos a seis años a quien conduzca o transporte a personas, para su ingreso al país o su egreso de él, por lugares no habilitados por las autoridades migratorias competentes, evadiendo los controles migratorios establecidos o utilizando datos o documentos falsos o alterados.

Translated

Article 249. - A prison sentence of two to six years will be imposed upon someone who leads or transports a person, so that they may enter or leave the country, at places not authorized by the immigration authorities, evading the established immigration controls or using false or altered facts and documents.


I couldn't find anything that imposed prison just for being in the country illegally. Your boss must have been doing a little something extra.

[edit on 31-7-2010 by daskakik]


No translation required on my part. Hablo Espanol muy bueno, mi amigo.

I just spoke with her and she is quite insistent that she is facing the possibility of 5 years in the local slam for her immigration violations. She has asked me to prepare for her long absence from the business.

Her son has just married a gal from Costa Rica and she also says Costa Rica does not take lightly any immigration infraction. 5 years is about right. They boot you out the first time, the second time they show very little mercy.

Sounds like Article 249 is pretty close to her situation. (She crossed the river from Nicaragua). I did not see any mention of drugs in what you posted above. Maybe I missed something in the translation. It does appear the altered or false documents may be the likely culprit.

Your response in the negative is really no surprise, because on ATS today, no matter what statement you make, there is someone more than willing to dispute what you have posted.

The bottom line of my previous post regarding her situation was to highlight the difference in the 2 countries immigration policies. You violate their immigration laws and you are harshly dealt with. Here they enter illegally and we kiss their butts, ignore our own laws, and provide them with many services which we pay for. If we protest, in come the SEIU Union buses to protest, and played up to the hilt by the MSM on the evening news. How dare you Americans stand for the rule of law - you useless feeders.

In this country, we can't have documents getting in the way of things, can we? They're just very minor details. "Besides, they had a tough time where they came from." No way can we let the facts confuse the issue.

But hey, since I do not practice law in Costa Rica, I can't factually dispute what you say, but maybe you would like to switch places with her and take your chances. At least you speak the language, that should be a plus.




posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 01:47 PM
link   
reply to post by Doubleagent
 


Your right as well as the corporations like it because the Mexicans will work for less money than the American Citizen.

There's big money in drugs and the fingers in the drug cartel jar stretch all the way up to the top of American Government as well.

That's why drugs will never be legalized.

Not to protect but for profit and to enslave.

[edit on 1-8-2010 by ofhumandescent]



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 01:51 PM
link   
reply to post by Jezus
 


I was just applying a little known thing called common sence.


They will use it like Toyota or whoever who sold units at a loss to build a customer base then raise prices when it siutes them.

But, this is just the way I see things, ya know, IN MY OPPINION.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 02:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by Oldnslo
Sounds like Article 249 is pretty close to her situation. (She crossed the river from Nicaragua). I did not see any mention of drugs in what you posted above. Maybe I missed something in the translation. It does appear the altered or false documents may be the likely culprit.

Your response in the negative is really no surprise, because on ATS today, no matter what statement you make, there is someone more than willing to dispute what you have posted.

But hey, since I do not practice law in Costa Rica, I can't factually dispute what you say, but maybe you would like to switch places with her and take your chances. At least you speak the language, that should be a plus.


Article 249 only states that there is a prison sentence for human trafficking. I didn't mean trafficking as in drugs but as in bringing in illegals like the mexican coyotes.

My statement is in the negative because I found info that says that even if she is facing 5 years it isn't just because of being illegal. If that is the only reason they have for imposing prison then it would seem to me that she may have a good chance of beating it. It bugs me when people say that the US kisses illegals butts. I know of more than a few people who have served time for using false papers before being deported from the states. Many get off but many don't

No I will not take her place. Why should I? I'm not the one breaking other countries immigration laws.

[edit on 1-8-2010 by daskakik]



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 03:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by Ghost of Chewie
reply to post by Jezus
 


I was just applying a little known thing called common sence.


They will use it like Toyota or whoever who sold units at a loss to build a customer base then raise prices when it siutes them.

But, this is just the way I see things, ya know, IN MY OPPINION.


Common sense?

The problem here is that you blind speculation is contrary to the observable reality in California as well as history.

Legalizing drugs is the first step to fighting organized crime.

They have already made so much money from the "War on Drugs" they are extremely powerful and wealthy.

Ending prohibition is obviously not an instant fix but it is the first step to stopping the violence.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 09:20 PM
link   
reply to post by Jezus
 


Only time will tell, my friend, time will tell. We will have to watch this one closely, if CA passes it. I personally hope they dont.

Have a good day sir.




new topics

 
4
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join