Graphene Bubbles have Bizarre magnetic properties

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posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 03:26 PM
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Does this aid you in your machine with carbon nano tubes?

I really like where this science is going.




posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 03:37 PM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
Does this aid you in your machine with carbon nano tubes?

I really like where this science is going.
'

Yes mentioned it in the op.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 


That is true. Superconductors are obviously less resistive than normal conductors. It is unknown whether graphene can superconduct and if so at what temperature it would.

Along with being the least resistive normal conductor graphene also has the highest ampacity of any normal resistive conductor.

If graphene could superconduct though, based on it's non-superconducting performance, it might have more ampacity while superconducting than any other type of superconductor. Amperage plays a pivotal role in magnetic field strength.

Current superconductors tend to top out at around 20 tesla because higher field strengths tend to push the superconductor back into a normal resistive conductor state.

Who knows where a possible graphene superconductor would top out in magnetic field strength.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by DaMod
 


heh, I can't believe no one is getting this joke. hilarious.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by Gentill Abdulla
www.sciencedaily.com...


ScienceDaily (July 29, 2010) — Graphene, a sheet of pure carbon heralded as a possible replacement for silicon-based semiconductors, has been found to have a unique and amazing property that could make it even more suitable for future electronic devices.

Specifically, the electrons within each nanobubble segregate into quantized energy levels instead of occupying energy bands, as in unstrained graphene. The energy levels are identical to those that an electron would occupy if it were moving in circles in a very strong magnetic field, as high as 300 tesla, which is bigger than any laboratory can produce except in brief explosions, said Michael Crommie, professor of physics at UC Berkeley and a faculty researcher at LBNL

"By controlling where the electrons bunch up and at what energy, you could cause them to move more easily or less easily through graphene, in effect, controlling their conductivity, optical or microwave properties. Control of electron movement is the most essential part of any electronic device.""

When you crank up a magnetic field you start seeing very interesting behavior because the electrons spin in tiny circles," he said. "This effect gives us a new way to induce this behavior, even in the absence of an actual magnetic field."

Among the unusual behaviors observed of electrons in strong magnetic fields are the quantum Hall effect and the fractional quantum Hall effect, where at low temperatures electrons also fall into quantized energy levels.


This is a very significant advancement in future of electronics.And it is also more observational evidence to support on my time travel thesis.

If you check the article it says 300 TESLA. 300 tesla is equal to 3 million gauss.And 30,000 gauss is equal to the amount of magnetic flux density of an MRI machine.So that is the thing that really blows my mind.

They could design this in a way to allow increased magnetic propulsion without the use of actual magnetic fields. And it would be magnitudes higher than what we are even capable of doing today.


Sounds like a thing that could be used if someone were attempting to build a particle accelerator.


[edit on 29-7-2010 by Gentill Abdulla]


Very nice find, this has alot of possibilities. Also it does seem that this is being put out because we have literally reached the end of our silicon age for microprocessors. Also as on person put it, it's psuedo gravity, and that is correct. But for us to get to the big things like faster space travel, gravity manipulation and other things, it will require us to find ways to cheat. Have any of you ever held a spinning disk drive in your hand, and if so have you ever tried to move the drive around. I did and it was the weirdest feeling of it having mass and not having mass at the same time. It had to do with me moving against the angular momentum of the spinning disks inside the case. Just like a gyroscope, precession happens. That is why if you spin a wheel and hold it in the air on a piece of wire and/or string and move it on edge, you will know that the spinning wheel doesn't fall toward the direction of gravity. When it isn't spinning it falls that way but while spinning it won't. In that instance using a gyroscope and the wheel acting as one, it was able to defy gravity.

You have to remember when things come out like this, it's probably have been used and tested for a few years already.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 08:40 PM
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Originally posted by LightFantastic
reply to post by Gentill Abdulla
 


Nice find Gentill

Notice that the article describeds a pseudomagnetic field rather than an actual magnetic field in that the electons behave in certain ways as if they were contained by said powerful field.

The article isnt saying that they can use graphene bubbles to create powerful magnetic fields.


I may not be understanding this correctly, but if these electrons behave in this manner, at what point (temperature) does this material become superconductive? (asking everyone, not just the person i quoted).

How could this be applied to the Podkletnov experiments?



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan

Originally posted by LightFantastic
reply to post by Gentill Abdulla
 


Nice find Gentill

Notice that the article describeds a pseudomagnetic field rather than an actual magnetic field in that the electons behave in certain ways as if they were contained by said powerful field.

The article isnt saying that they can use graphene bubbles to create powerful magnetic fields.


I may not be understanding this correctly, but if these electrons behave in this manner, at what point (temperature) does this material become superconductive? (asking everyone, not just the person i quoted).

How could this be applied to the Podkletnov experiments?


Here is a quote from the link....


Crommie noted that the "pseudomagnetic fields" inside the nanobubbles are so high that the energy levels are separated by hundreds of millivolts, much higher than room temperature. Thus, thermal noise would not interfere with this effect in graphene even at room temperature. The nanobubble experiments performed in Crommie's laboratory, however, were performed at very low temperature.


It means they think it wouldn't have to be done at the cold temperatures but they did it at those temperatures.

And in my time machine process this effect would be seen where it matters the most.

Next to the magnets. Allowing these densities to increase to unimaginable ratios.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 09:02 PM
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As far as I know, graphene is not superconductive at any temperatue. It can be made so when combined with calcium, but only at very, very low temperatures.

This Nature article says 11.5 Kelvin (or 6.5 Kelvin if you use ytterbium).

www.nature.com...



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by nataylor
As far as I know, graphene is not superconductive at any temperatue. It can be made so when combined with calcium, but only at very, very low temperatures.

This Nature article says 11.5 Kelvin (or 6.5 Kelvin if you use ytterbium).

www.nature.com...


That article was 5 years ago.

It is known that rolled up graphite, carbon nanotubes, have very valuable electrical properties.

Science Daily is the way to go.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 


Something very, very few people really consider: in space, there are lots of things that become superconductive. The mundane become extraordinary.

But GA is right....what i am asking is if this highly charged environment would provide room temperature, stable superconductivity. On Earth, we need to make it operate optimally in a narrow range of temperatures to be fully deployable. Until then, it is simply a laboratory trick.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by Gentill Abdulla
 


OK, apply this to the Li/Podkletnov experiments now.

You have a superconductor that spins at a high rate of speed. Upon reaching a certain speed, there is noticed a slight loss in downward force, or weight. This indicates a loss of gravitational effect, as it is not centrifugal force, or inertia (in the mundane sense, anyway) that is causing it.

The best guess thus far is that the loss in weight (somewhat small, like 2 or 3%...i cannot recall but have a thread on it from a while back if you want to look it up in my profile) was caused by "lattice ions" or ions that exerted a force, a la angular momentum, that created a levitational capability.

The ramifications of even a small loss in weight/gravitational effect would be lucrative in savings. The cost to launch payload into orbit is a little bit more than the gas you would use to take the kids to Disney. LOL.

Here is where my lack of education comes into play....


....would the "harmonious" actions of the graphene molecules lend itself to an increased effect of this Podkletnov/Li effect?

Something else....the ability to withstand thermal degradation. Would this make graphene a good media for data management? Phonon type disruption is konwn to make circuits unstable. would this material help reduce thermal "noise"?

Having a room temperature superconductor would sure go a long way towards making travel cheaper.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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Remember...anything they release they are already 20-40 years ahead of.

They leak this stuff out slowly so it just blends in with the surroundings of other technologies.

Remember the PC was amazing at first but now it is common as watches you wear on your wrist.



posted on Jul, 30 2010 @ 10:18 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Gentill Abdulla
 


OK, apply this to the Li/Podkletnov experiments now.

You have a superconductor that spins at a high rate of speed. Upon reaching a certain speed, there is noticed a slight loss in downward force, or weight. This indicates a loss of gravitational effect, as it is not centrifugal force, or inertia (in the mundane sense, anyway) that is causing it.


And you will find that the loss of downward force is proportional to speed.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 04:28 AM
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reply to post by badw0lf
 


In a way, all of us are time travelers, all of the time.

Except we can only physically access and interact with the present and the future, the past can be visited, but only on a mental basis through memories.

We all do this every day of our lives.

OP, (and everyone else of course) what, if anything has been envisioned for this material in terms of energy generation..i've seen one post touch on fusion, but would there be any other advanced energy generation applications that you good folks can think of?

Cheers for the thread, really interesting stuff.



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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Oops..looks like i killed a thread again!

I only asked...no need to run away..come back!

This is an interesting thread!



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by StargateSG7

Originally posted by Maxmars
That kind of magnetic density opens up some real possibilities. Nice find!


This could be used as a PERMANENT kind of memory storage
which would probably be a heck of a lot faster than hard disks
or flash memory.

And with teh size of the graphene structure me thinks
you might see 10 Petabyte storage cards for but a few bucks!

OR an iPhone with a 1000 Gigabytes of Memory


This is correct as well as far back as the year 2000.

They had prototype nano structure memory at a company called
Nantero.

Nantero

Nantero - NVRAM - DRAM replacement



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 11:13 PM
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Originally posted by spikey
reply to post by badw0lf
 


In a way, all of us are time travelers, all of the time.

Except we can only physically access and interact with the present and the future, the past can be visited, but only on a mental basis through memories.

We all do this every day of our lives.

OP, (and everyone else of course) what, if anything has been envisioned for this material in terms of energy generation..i've seen one post touch on fusion, but would there be any other advanced energy generation applications that you good folks can think of?

Cheers for the thread, really interesting stuff.




Time exists as a universal construct so that things maintain plausible order and the mechanism of cause-and-effect is preserved. It's the movement of objects through space that defines a given time-frame, whether it be an electron or a Boeing. Otherwise, all objects would seem to occupy space simultaneously. (Which is also why we perceive distance between those objects.)

So, time and space exist to keep our feeble human minds from being torn apart by attempting to process every reaction in the universe at once. lol



posted on Jul, 31 2010 @ 11:17 PM
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Originally posted by Ex_MislTech

Originally posted by StargateSG7

Originally posted by Maxmars
That kind of magnetic density opens up some real possibilities. Nice find!


This could be used as a PERMANENT kind of memory storage
which would probably be a heck of a lot faster than hard disks
or flash memory.

And with teh size of the graphene structure me thinks
you might see 10 Petabyte storage cards for but a few bucks!

OR an iPhone with a 1000 Gigabytes of Memory


This is correct as well as far back as the year 2000.

They had prototype nano structure memory at a company called
Nantero.

Nantero

Nantero - NVRAM - DRAM replacement


According to the current trend of processors doubling in capacity and shrinking in size and price by half every two years, in another two decades we'll have computers the size of a postage stamp and with twice the power of a human brain, for a dollar.



posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 02:32 AM
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Originally posted by DCPatriot

Originally posted by Bobbox1980
One of my pet ideas is that alien UFOs use graphene in the skin of their hull to generate the immense magnetic fields needed( if Heim theory turns out to be true) to propel their craft.

Graphene layered on Nitenol (the memory metal supposedly found at Roswell). They have similar tensile strengths and graphene is the most conductive material known to humankind.

[edit on 30-7-2010 by Bobbox1980]


That exactly was my point in my since deleted post above.

I am not an engineer, but I understand that a high-speed train propels itself by synchronized magnets.

Why not be able to do the same thing in a graphite-type skinned craft?

Suddenly this changes my entire outlook on the Phoenix Lights and Stephenville, Texas sightings.


As for me, this changes my outlook on the whole Apollo 20/retiredafb controversy. In the book by Luca Scantamburlo titled "Apollo20: The Disclosure", retiredafb mentioned to Scantamburlo that the derelict ships on the Moon used up to 300 Teslas and used MagnetoHydro Dynamics. He also mentioned that the Roswell UFOs used the same amount of Teslas. Furthermore, he mentioned that the derelict ships retained their overall shape even after being bombarded by meteorites for millions of years because they seemed to be made from material that had "memory of shape".
I might get flamed for bringing up that subject, but I find it quite intriguing.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 11:53 AM
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Question for anyone, what might be the results combining Graphene and Bismuth ?





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