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The man who refused a million dollars

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posted on Jul, 21 2010 @ 08:19 PM
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The man who refused a million dollars By Svetlana Smetanina | July 19, 2010




Grigory Perelman
What everyone has been talking about for so long and couldn't quite believe has now finally happened. The Russian mathematician Grigory Perelman has officially refused the Millennium Prize of $1 million awarded him by the Clay Mathematics Institute in Cambridge, Mass., for proving the Poincaré conjecture. Perelman's explanation for this refusal was as surprising as his actual refusal. He disagrees with the decision of the mathematics community: "I do not like their decision, I consider it unfair," he said. "I consider that the American mathematician [Richard] Hamilton's contribution to the solution of the problem is no less than mine." What Hamilton thinks about this is not yet known.

Since March, when the prize winner was announced, people had been guessing whether Perelman would take the money or not (he had earlier refused a prize of $10,000), and if he did take it, then what he would spend it on. Any number of people wanted to help him in this less-than-simple matter. The most forthright turned out to be the communists of St. Petersburg, Perelman's native city. They wrote him a letter containing a detailed plan of action. First, said the communists, you need to quickly take the money, preferably with interest. Second, invest it in the construction of a scientific center to educate children from low-income families. Third (our personal request), contribute $100,000 to the Lenin's Tomb Fund.

The Russian government also had something to say about "Perelman's problem." Vladimir Putin, in a speech to Russia's academicians who are always asking him for money for science, suggested that they follow Grigory Perelman's example. "We try to help him at least in some way, but he won't take even our money," the prime minister said with pride.

This hitherto unknown mathematician has suddenly become incredibly popular. The public has asked that he be made an honorary resident of Petersburg. Viktor Vekselberg, head of the high-tech Skolkovo Project, has asked Perelman to be on the innovation city's advisory board. Some people are even trying to befriend the reclusive mathematician. For example, fellow Petersburger Sergei Mironov, Speaker of the Federation Council. Like the communists, he wrote Perelman a letter full of compliments and flattery and asked to meet with him to discuss problems of science. Who knows, Perelman and Mironov may indeed have something to talk about. Mironov, too, has refused money. Judging by his income declarations, he is the "poorest" of all of Russia's governors. He literally lives from paycheck to paycheck. Even so, Perelman did not write him back.

Full Article




posted on Jul, 21 2010 @ 08:20 PM
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a million dollars?

must not be as smart as we thought. jk

nice post



posted on Jul, 21 2010 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by StealthKix
 


A man of character, something we all need to understand and realize that if we don't start standing up for whats RIGHT we wont grow as a race, I for one do as I say, I wouldn't fire a young guy that worked for me because of a decision I made that he got caught up in (was really a funny story though), but in the end I was fired because I wouldn't fire him and as I understand it he was too after I left.

Sometimes we just need to stand up for whats right regardless the cost.



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by StealthKix
 

my guess: it was a consideration or weighting.
as a shy genius guy, he had to choose, take the million and go to a big celebration with audience onto a greater famousness, or going on with a decent and peaceful life.



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 07:58 AM
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"This hitherto unknown mathematician has suddenly become incredibly popular. The public has asked that he be made an honorary resident of Petersburg. Viktor Vekselberg, head of the high-tech Skolkovo Project, has asked Perelman to be on the innovation city's advisory board." I think maybe he just wants a place in history, I'd say he's going about it in good way and will be remembered. Or he just really really doesnt like money for some reason.

"I consider that the American mathematician [Richard] Hamilton's contribution to the solution of the problem is no less than mine."
Well why didnt you just split the prize money with him? Does no one get the money now because he refused it? If thats the case, that Hamilton guy is probably pissed


[edit on 22-7-2010 by CREAM]



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by StealthKix
 


I applaud Perelman for sticking to his beliefs... I would have done something else:

1) Collect the $1 million
2) Skip happily to the bank
3) Deposit $1 million
4) Speak out why you disagree with mathematics community
5) Go to Tahiti
6) Pick up two beautiful, young ladies who are in their experimental stages
7) Order bottles of rum and tequila
8) Have fun



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 12:19 PM
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Personally, I don't think I'd be able to pass up 10,000 let alone 1million.
I give the man a lot of respect. and understand completely where he might be coming from.
When you have money there will always be those willing to try and take it from you. IE, his government already had their sights on it.
Aside from that kind of thing, it would present a tremendous distraction for someone who no doubt is very focused on their work.
The argument goes both ways.
Anyways, Salute'.



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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He was probably offended, paper strips instead of gold.



posted on Mar, 29 2011 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by CREAM


"I consider that the American mathematician [Richard] Hamilton's contribution to the solution of the problem is no less than mine."

Well why didnt you just split the prize money with him? Does no one get the money now because he refused it? If thats the case, that Hamilton guy is probably pissed




Because of two things. First he rejects the pagentry of it all, saying "the proof is there, that is all that maters." And second, because the Fields Medal committee was going to force him to split the prize with two other mathematicians who probably did nothing more than steal his work. Grisha wont say this out loud but has talked around it.




Here is some paparazzi footage on him.





Here is Masha Gessen talking about the book she wrote about him. "Perfect Rigor."







Here is a fun little video explaining what he did.


David Grouchy



posted on Mar, 30 2011 @ 11:17 PM
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Anyone concerned that
the, arguably, smartest person on earth
has rejected the mathmatics community for lack of rigor.

Anyone. Anyone.


David Grouchy



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