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Where's The Oil?Model Suggests May Be Gone...

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posted on May, 15 2010 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to Just Wondering

reply to Doc Velocity

Perhaps you should look at

Scientists find giant oil plumes under Gulf


“There’s a shocking amount of oil in the deep water, relative to what you see in the surface water,” said Samantha Joye, a researcher at the University of Georgia who is involved in one of the first scientific missions to gather details about what is happening in the gulf. “There’s a tremendous amount of oil in multiple layers, three or four or five layers deep in the water column.”


And, the plumes are heading SOUTHWEST.


Interviewed on Saturday by satellite phone, one researcher aboard the Pelican, Vernon Asper of the University of Southern Mississippi, said the shallowest oil plume the group had detected was at about 2,300 feet, while the deepest was near the seafloor at about 4,200 feet.




[edit on 15/5/2010 by Iamonlyhuman]




posted on May, 15 2010 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by BS-Buster
 

Hello new member, I see you registered TODAY to post those pictures my my pretty experienced at posting pictures for being a "noob" most noobs have trouble even finding the upload center.


As for your pictures, they are at least from ten days ago. The sea state has been choppy and upwards of 4ft waves, that is why all the skimming boats were sent in to the dock. But you wouldn't know this unless you are in the gulf region as some of us are. What you have picture here is shoing dead calm seas which is what it was like during the first few days of the leak. (nice try)

And for those of you that think I am employed by BP...they couldn't afford me.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by Just Wondering
 

I predict you will be eating crow before this is over. I hope I'm wrong.

Take a look at the results of the Exxon Valdez spill...

Almost 20 years after the spill, a team of scientists at the University of North Carolina found that the effects are lasting far longer than expected. The team estimates some shoreline Arctic habitats may take up to 30 years to recover. Exxon Mobil denies any concerns over this, stating that they anticipated a remaining fraction that they assert will not cause any long-term ecological impacts, according to the conclusions of 350 peer-reviewed studies. However, a study from scientists from the NOAA concluded that this contamination can produce chronic low-level exposure, discourage subsistence where the contamination is heavy, and decrease the "wilderness character" of the area.
Exxon Valdez oil spill



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 11:00 PM
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The real problem may not be the oil.

But the oil shows up nicely in photos so that is what everyone sees.

The natural gas and what is mixed in it may be the real danger.

A large % of the natural gas will form Methane clathrates at 5000 feet of depth.
en.wikipedia.org...

This will sink to the bottom and pose little problems.

In oil field terms this is call sweet gas.

But there is what is called sour gas.
This has a larger % of hydrogen sulfate.
The hydrogen sulfate is highly toxic.
As toxic as hydrogen cyanide.
Hydrogen sulfate gas will dissolve in water and stay displacing oxygen,
This causes the ocean to become anoxic (oxygen-depleted) (dead zones)
en.wikipedia.org...
www.scientificamerican.com...



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 11:06 PM
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Here is where the oil is.

www.nytimes.com...

Scientists are finding enormous oil plumes in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, including one as large as 10 miles long, 3 miles wide and 300 feet thick in spots. The discovery is fresh evidence that the leak from the broken undersea well could be substantially worse than estimates that the government and BP have given.

I posted this in another thread.



posted on May, 15 2010 @ 11:32 PM
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Originally posted by Spazzy
if oil evaporates how come i see it in parking spots all over the place?


you actually see oil in parking spots?


Seriously... I just read this before going to bed and now I'm going to try to sleep while laughing!

Like they say in Top Gear... "And with this bombshell we end tonight's show... g'night everyone, see ya next week"



posted on May, 16 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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Originally posted by Iamonlyhuman
Perhaps you should look at
Scientists find giant oil plumes under Gulf

Yeah, I read that earlier, and it tells you, right there, WHY those oil plumes are down there, deep under the surface.

It's because this type (or "class") of oil is a heavy, dense kind of crude — the same density as seawater, as a matter of fact. Which means that it doesn't float to the surface, as does the lighter, more toxic crude oil.

Class C crude has low toxicity, emulsifies (blends) in seawater, and typically degrades into Class D crude, which is non-toxic and eventually dissipates.

The greatest danger the undersea "oil plumes" pose is that they deplete the oxygen in the water column, as it says in the story. However, these plumes will most likely sink to the deep ocean floor, where there is little oxygen (or marine life) anyway. It may take a while for this dense crude to dissipate, but it's NOT going to be washing up on beaches, coating everything with oil, as the hysterical sensationalists would have you believe.

Frankly, a natural algae bloom of Red Tide poses more oxygen-depleting danger to the marine life than does the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

— Doc Velocity




[edit on 5/16/2010 by Doc Velocity]



posted on May, 16 2010 @ 12:30 AM
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Originally posted by alchemist2012
You sir are truly a Dis-Info Specialist(so i can safely say BP is paying you by the post)

Your information is either faulty, out-of-date, or you're a liar.

According to Mainstreet.com's study of the "wealthiest states in the USA," Louisiana has
59,747 millionaire households (that's 3.54% of Louisiana's population), and the median household income in Louisiana is $43,635 — far from poverty level.

And guess what: In the Mainstreet study, Louisiana is listed as the LEAST DEPRESSED state in the union.

Stick THAT in your "fragile economy" and smoke it.

— Doc Velocity




[edit on 5/16/2010 by Doc Velocity]



posted on May, 16 2010 @ 05:11 AM
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cryptogon.com...

Scientists are finding enormous oil plumes in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico, including one as large as 10 miles long, 3 miles wide and 300 feet thick in spots. The discovery is fresh evidence that the leak from the broken undersea well could be substantially worse than estimates that the government and BP have given.

“There’s a shocking amount of oil in the deep water, relative to what you see in the surface water,” said Samantha Joye, a researcher at the University of Georgia who is involved in one of the first scientific missions to gather details about what is happening in the gulf. “There’s a tremendous amount of oil in multiple layers, three or four or five layers deep in the water column.”



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