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Nanotube transistor will help us bond with machines

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posted on May, 12 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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Nanotube transistor will help us bond with machines


www.newscientist.com

A novel transistor controlled by the chemical that provides the energy for our cells' metabolism could be a big step towards making prosthetic devices that can be wired directly into the nervous system.

Transistors are the fundamental building blocks of electronic gadgets, so finding ways to control them with biological signals could provide a route towards integrating electronics with the body.

Aleksandr Noy at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California and colleagues chose to control their transistor with adenosine triphosphate (ATP)
(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Nano Spider DNA Breakthrough
Nano-suit military technology - Awesome.
SCI/TECH: Monkeys Adapt Robot Arm as Their Own
Nano Free Electricity Generators, and Your Brain

[edit on Wed May 12 2010 by Rren]




posted on May, 12 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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Very cool. From the article:


Noy claims that this is the first example of a truly integrated bioelectronic system. "I hope that this type of technology could be used to construct seamless bioelectronic interfaces to allow better communication between living organisms and machines."

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Here's the paper: Carbon Nanotube Transistor Controlled by a Biological Ion Pump Gate

Adenosine triphosphate(ATP) is produced in the cell by the molecular machine known as the ATP synthase molecule... which deserves a thread all its own, but, I digress.


Merging nature's machines with our own? Good idea?

While reading and researching this I came across some interesting reading which you may enjoy as well:

NextGen Triple-Helix DNA -It Could be Scary!

Blue Brain Project

Nanotechnology Makes Way for Cyborg Soldiers



Regards.



www.newscientist.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 05:28 PM
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Wait, so they dont know forsure this will work on humans? It is just a theory right of now?



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by Maddogkull
 


Correct, it works 'in theory,' with hopes for some future application in humans. As the snippet I quoted in the OP stated: " ...could be a big step towards making prosthetic devices that can be wired directly into the nervous system."

We will see, but I figure it's just a matter of time. Next stop - RoboCop!



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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I am more amazed by this triple helix DNA strand you speak of. It seems amazing. Imagine humans with a Triple Helix. One thing I never understood. Every cell we have has double strand DNA. So would that mean we would have to replace every cell with the so called Triple strand DNA or it to be effective (not amazing at biology
) Is that even possible?



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 05:56 PM
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reply to post by Maddogkull
 




To be honest, I'm not sure how it would work (I presume the 'triples' would eventually overtake/replace the 'doubles' over time). There's an ATS thread titled, Triple Helix DNA, that may be of some use. The first page didn't cover anything like your question but I didn't read the rest. If not, maybe someone there can answer your question(s) on the subject.

Regards.



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 07:45 PM
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Found more related reading:

From '03: DNA Creates Self-Assembling Nano-Transistor




Scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have harnessed the power of DNA to create a self-assembling nanoscale transistor, the building block of electronics. The research, published in Science, is a crucial step in the development of nanoscale devices. Erez Braun, lead scientist on the project and associate professor in the Faculty Physics at the Technion, says science has been intrigued with the idea of using biology to build electronic transistors that assemble without human manipulation. However, until now, demonstrating it in the lab has remained elusive. "This paper shows you can start with DNA proteins and molecular biology and construct an electronic device," he said.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.





Related to my comment 'is this a good idea' from CNN ('08): Scientists: Humans and machines will merge in future



A group of experts from around the world will hold a first of its kind conference Thursday on global catastrophic risks.


Some experts say humans will merge with machines before the end of this century.

1 of 3 They will discuss what should be done to prevent these risks from becoming realities that could lead to the end of human life on Earth as we know it.

Speakers at the four-day event at Oxford University in Britain will talk about topics including nuclear terrorism and what to do if a large asteroid were to be on a collision course with our planet.

On the final day of the Global Catastrophic Risk Conference, experts will focus on what could be the unintended consequences of new technologies, such as superintelligent machines that, if ill-conceived, might cause the demise of Homo sapiens.

"Any entity which is radically smarter than human beings would also be very powerful," said Dr. Nick Bostrom, director of Oxford's Future of Humanity Institute, host of the symposium. "If we get something wrong, you could imagine the consequences would involve the extinction of the human species."


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.





Continuing the theme, from BBC News '08): Machines 'to match man by 2029'



Humanity is on the brink of advances that will see tiny robots implanted in people's brains to make them more intelligent, said Ray Kurzweil.

The engineer believes machines and humans will eventually merge through devices implanted in the body to boost intelligence and health.

"It's really part of our civilisation," Mr Kurzweil explained.
"But that's not going to be an alien invasion of intelligent machines to displace us."

Machines were already doing hundreds of things humans used to do, at human levels of intelligence or better, in many different areas, he said.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



And finally, for now: Human-machine merge could provide future paradise



[...]

By 2015, robots will perform a variety of household chores; by 2020, many human jobs will be filled by robots; and by 2030, robots will be competent in most human activities.

This trend will peak in the mid-2030s when machines laden with strong AI surpass human intelligence and begin making copies of themselves, with each generation smarter than the last. This will cause an information explosion unlike anything the world has ever experienced and will result in the development of machine-to-human brain interface systems.

Some people will scan their minds capturing all of the memories, emotions, and thought processes that describe them as a human being – and upload that data into a robot and become the machine. Others will download the vast stream of machine intelligence directly into their brains and become an intelligence-enhanced human.

Over the next few years, molecular nanotechnology and the number-crunching abilities of quantum computing will enable humans and human/machines to redesign their bodies and brains to increase efficiency until they both morph into a replica of each other. At that time, society may consider both machines and humans as “transhumans.”
[...]



Times they are a changin'



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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You will be assimilated!
Resistance is futile!




posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:04 PM
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AWESOME!!! Where do I sign up for an upgrade? I so want to be a cyborg! Does it really seem all that brilliant that within 2 decades machines will be building new and improved versions of themselves and will be "smarter" than we are? Perhaps a kernel of truth in the Terminator movie series? Is skynet here?



posted on May, 12 2010 @ 10:14 PM
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Their robotic nwo slavery 3rd strand IS not and never will be advancement.



posted on May, 13 2010 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by azrael36
AWESOME!!! Where do I sign up for an upgrade? I so want to be a cyborg!



I don't know about that; the idea kind of creeps me out a bit.




Does it really seem all that brilliant that within 2 decades machines will be building new and improved versions of themselves and will be "smarter" than we are?




Could be brilliant... could be catastrophic. I can think of several ways this could be bad/misused (as any bad sci-fi movie can attest to.) Unintended consequences and all that.





Perhaps a kernel of truth in the Terminator movie series? Is skynet here?



Combine the possible future transhumanism cyborg stuff with the possible future invention of a strong Artificial Intelligence and who knows, maybe DangerDeath is right....





Originally posted by DangerDeath
You will be assimilated!
Resistance is futile!





:O . . . The Horror!







Originally posted by Unity_99
Their robotic nwo slavery 3rd strand IS not and never will be advancement.



Um, well, uh... yeah. So there's that too. Which is nice.



posted on May, 13 2010 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by Rren
 


There are always some people that get "freaked" out about huge advancements in technology. Look at history. But merging of man and machine is the future and frankly i wish i could be around to see it, im in my 20's but it will be the beginning of the next century before it is used for anything outside of medicine...and future generations will look upon it like we do in regards to mobile phones,mp3 players etc It will just be the "norm" to get a technological upgrade to your body.


[edit on 13-5-2010 by Solomons]



posted on May, 14 2010 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by Solomons

There are always some people that get "freaked" out about huge advancements in technology. Look at history.


So is there no line to be drawn? Everything goes, that's just progress?



But merging of man and machine is the future and frankly i wish i could be around to see it, im in my 20's but it will be the beginning of the next century before it is used for anything outside of medicine...and future generations will look upon it like we do in regards to mobile phones,mp3 players etc It will just be the "norm" to get a technological upgrade to your body.



So cyborgs, cloning, 'memory uploads," (etc.) are the furture equivalent of today's mp3 player? Like I said - creepy. I like my humanity, you know... human. Your mileage may vary. However, I do agree with you that these things are likely inevitable at some point in the future. Only where I worry about it you look forward to it. We'll see. We can argue about it then... you know, when our new machine-overlords have us on lockdown/plugged in to the Matrix/whatever.



Anyway.....


Artificial skin graft promises to make you sweat




IT'S still a long way from the replicants in Blade Runner, but artificial skin containing sweat glands has been produced for the first time - and tested in mice.




So they'll have skin. Cool. But it's not like they'll be smarter than us or anything. Not like they'll have anything like a human brain or mind....



Brain-Like Computing on an Organic Molecular Layer



ScienceDaily (Apr. 26, 2010) — Information processing circuits in digital computers are static. In our brains, information processing circuits -- neurons -- evolve continuously to solve complex problems. Now, an international research team from Japan and Michigan Technological University has created a similar process of circuit evolution in an organic molecular layer that can solve complex problems. This is the first time a brain-like "evolutionary circuit" has been realized. This computer is massively parallel[...]



The monolayer has intelligence; it can solve many problems on the same grid. Their molecular processor heals itself if there is a defect. This remarkable self-healing property comes from the self-organizing ability of the molecular monolayer. No existing man-made computer has this property, but our brain does: if a neuron dies, another neuron takes over its function.




Here is the paper: Massively parallel computing on an organic molecular layer

Abstract:

Modern computers operate at enormous speeds—capable of executing in excess of 1013 instructions per second—but their sequential approach to processing, by which logical operations are performed one after another, has remained unchanged since the 1950s. In contrast, although individual neurons of the human brain fire at around just 103 times per second, the simultaneous collective action of millions of neurons enables them to complete certain tasks more efficiently than even the fastest supercomputer. Here we demonstrate an assembly of molecular switches that simultaneously interact to perform a variety of computational tasks including conventional digital logic, calculating Voronoi diagrams, and simulating natural phenomena such as heat diffusion and cancer growth. As well as representing a conceptual shift from serial-processing with static architectures, our parallel, dynamically reconfigurable approach could provide a means to solve otherwise intractable computational problems




Sweet dreams.

[edit on Fri May 14 2010 by Rren]



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 12:50 PM
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Distilling Free-Form Natural Laws from Experimental Data



Abstract:

Michael Schmidt1 and Hod Lipson2,3*

For centuries, scientists have attempted to identify and document analytical laws that underlie physical phenomena in nature. Despite the prevalence of computing power, the process of finding natural laws and their corresponding equations has resisted automation. A key challenge to finding analytic relations automatically is defining algorithmically what makes a correlation in observed data important and insightful. We propose a principle for the identification of nontriviality. We demonstrated this approach by automatically searching motion-tracking data captured from various physical systems, ranging from simple harmonic oscillators to chaotic double-pendula. Without any prior knowledge about physics, kinematics, or geometry, the algorithm discovered Hamiltonians, Lagrangians, and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation. The discovery rate accelerated as laws found for simpler systems were used to bootstrap explanations for more complex systems, gradually uncovering the "alphabet" used to describe those systems.

1 Computational Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
2 School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
3 Computing and Information Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.


Read the Full Text



(Emphasis mine)


IT'S ALIVE!





Cornell Computational Synthesis Laboratory

At the Cornell Computational Synthesis Lab we explore biologically-inspired computational and physical processes that allow complex high-level systems to arise from low-level building blocks—automatically. We seek new biological concepts for engineering and new engineering insights into biology (video).



Makes you wonder how close to real AI and/or cybernetic organisms we truly are. Surely we are farther along than They tell us... and just look at what They're already telling us! My little thread here is just a drop in the bucket wrt what's in the public domain already. The big news this week with that [extra long] synthetic genome, too....

'Tis a head scratcher.



posted on Oct, 19 2010 @ 11:07 PM
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Making Robotic Prosthetics We Can Control With Our Minds


[...snip]

Now here in the real world, we have trouble linking robotic limbs directly to nerves because our bodies reject metal attachments to our nerves. So Doc Ock really achieved something there, setting aside the later problems with the arms’ AI (surely an easily fixed bug).




Now a crew of scientists at Southern Methodist University is working on their own technique for creating two-way communications between an artificial limb and a user’s brain. It uses non-metallic polymers, and at its core, it uses the same principal as whispering galleries of the sort that can be found in St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, or at certain parts of Grand Central Station in New York. Indeed, they call it a “whispering gallery mode.”


[snip...]


... allowing for true two-way communication between the robotic limb and the brain.

Researchers at Southern Methodist University have already built a device that pretty much achieves all of these functions but it’s far too large, at several hundred microns. But they received a grant from DARPA or $5.6 million, and they’re hoping to build a robotic limb using this technology for a dog or a cat within the next two years. Just think: Doc Ock could have a little friend!



Al... most... there. duh duh DUHHHH!




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